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Archaeologists uncover 69 tombs in Peru

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  • Paul Bader
    Archaeologists uncover 69 tombs in Peru May 17 2005 at 10:48AM By Rick Vecchio Lima, Peru - Archaeologists have uncovered a multilevel grave site at the
    Message 1 of 2 , May 17 10:58 AM
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      Archaeologists uncover 69 tombs in Peru

          May 17 2005 at 10:48AM

      By Rick Vecchio

      Lima, Peru - Archaeologists have uncovered a multilevel grave site at the ancient ruins of Pachacamac, including mummy bundles containing whole families and pilgrims who presumably sought cures from an oracle deity for diseases like syphilis, tuberculosis and cancer, the project's leader said on Monday.

      "What is interesting in this cemetery is that it is totally intact, and we have mummies of different epochs, different periods, and they have their burial goods with them," archaeologist Peter Eeckhout, of the Free University of Brussels, said.

      "This will be very useful for us to (determine) the chronology of the site and the succession of the cultures here," he said.

      Eeckhout started to excavate the site in 1999
      Pachacamac, 32km south of the capital, Lima, was a sprawling ceremonial centre of 18 mud-brick pyramids with ramps and plazas ruled by the Ychsma lords from 900 AD to 1470. Today, the ruins are a major tourist attraction.

      Eeckhout started to excavate the site in 1999, heading an international team of archaeologists in the Project Ychsma (Pronounced EESH-MA).

      The Inca Empire conquered the religious center less than a century before Spanish Conquistador Francisco Pizarro's brother, Hernando, plundered the site in 1533 and destroyed the idol that served as an oracle.

      Eeckhout said that archaeologists began exploring Pachacamac in the 1890s but found much of the nearly 600-hectare ruins already looted, and quickly ran out of intact tombs to explore.

      But this year, he said, his team decided to dig near a pyramid ramp that had been overlooked. So far, they have excavated 69 tombs and funerary bundles in the area.

      'Brought to Pachacamac from other sites in order to be cured by the great god'
      "Part of the cemetery had been protected from looting in the colonial and modern periods thanks to the crumbling and destruction of some walls" which formed a protective cover, he said.

      Digging down more than a dozen feet (four meters), they found three levels of burial remains.

      "In the upper layer of burials, we have an abnormal proportion of individuals who were suffering from very grave and lethal diseases, such as syphilis, tuberculosis and cancer," he said. "This leads us to think that these people were brought to Pachacamac from other sites in order to be cured by the great god that had his sanctuary here."

      Lower down were funerary bundles dating back to before the Inca Empire turned Pachacamac into a pilgrimage center around 1470.

      "The second layer is much more local, related to the region of Pachacamac and we have what we traditionally interpret as family burials," Eeckhout said. "In the same mummy bundle, we have one male, one female and the children. We are currently excavating these mummies."

      He said his team had found several sealed tombs that they had not yet breached, and a third level with mummified remains from an even earlier period. This year's excavation season ends this month, he added, and the excavation site will be filled in to protect it until digging resumes next year. - Sapa-AP

      http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?set_id=1&click_id=588&art_id=qw111630744330B216

       



      Warmest Regards,
      Paul Bader
      Atlantean Records

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    • james m. clark jr.
      Oh shit these aren t shovelbums these are Vespucci (emphisis on pucci) MIRage inspectors that are digging for treasure in mole hills with a wasp passport to
      Message 2 of 2 , May 18 5:47 AM
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        Oh shit these aren't shovelbums these are Vespucci (emphisis on pucci)
        MIRage inspectors that are digging for treasure in mole hills with a
        wasp passport to nowhere. Skulls for sale on ebay again?

        You know, I read an article by a modern explorer who discovered a
        important village in Peru awhile back with an interesting assumption
        claiming Peru had somewhat the same meaning as the biblical land of
        fire. At any rate, it is hard to imagine that the western us would be
        excluded if that had to really be taken seriously. But it is
        interesing that tin mines are near by. Now that would be worth
        reading about.

        be well,
        jamey




        --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, Paul Bader
        <poseidian@y...> wrote:
        > Archaeologists uncover 69 tombs in Peru
        > May 17 2005 at 10:48AM
        > By Rick Vecchio
        >
        > Lima, Peru - Archaeologists have uncovered a multilevel grave site
        at the ancient ruins of Pachacamac, including mummy bundles
        containing whole families and pilgrims who presumably sought cures
        from an oracle deity for diseases like syphilis, tuberculosis and
        cancer, the project's leader said on Monday.
        >
        > "What is interesting in this cemetery is that it is totally intact,
        and we have mummies of different epochs, different periods, and they
        have their burial goods with them," archaeologist Peter Eeckhout, of
        the Free University of Brussels, said.
        >
        > "This will be very useful for us to (determine) the chronology of
        the site and the succession of the cultures here," he said.
        >
        > Eeckhout started to excavate the site in 1999Pachacamac, 32km south
        of the capital, Lima, was a sprawling ceremonial centre of 18 mud-
        brick pyramids with ramps and plazas ruled by the Ychsma lords from
        900 AD to 1470. Today, the ruins are a major tourist attraction.
        >
        > Eeckhout started to excavate the site in 1999, heading an
        international team of archaeologists in the Project Ychsma
        (Pronounced EESH-MA).
        >
        > The Inca Empire conquered the religious center less than a century
        before Spanish Conquistador Francisco Pizarro's brother, Hernando,
        plundered the site in 1533 and destroyed the idol that served as an
        oracle.
        >
        > Eeckhout said that archaeologists began exploring Pachacamac in the
        1890s but found much of the nearly 600-hectare ruins already looted,
        and quickly ran out of intact tombs to explore.
        >
        > But this year, he said, his team decided to dig near a pyramid ramp
        that had been overlooked. So far, they have excavated 69 tombs and
        funerary bundles in the area.
        >
        > 'Brought to Pachacamac from other sites in order to be cured by the
        great god'"Part of the cemetery had been protected from looting in
        the colonial and modern periods thanks to the crumbling and
        destruction of some walls" which formed a protective cover, he said.
        >
        > Digging down more than a dozen feet (four meters), they found three
        levels of burial remains.
        >
        > "In the upper layer of burials, we have an abnormal proportion of
        individuals who were suffering from very grave and lethal diseases,
        such as syphilis, tuberculosis and cancer," he said. "This leads us
        to think that these people were brought to Pachacamac from other
        sites in order to be cured by the great god that had his sanctuary
        here."
        >
        > Lower down were funerary bundles dating back to before the Inca
        Empire turned Pachacamac into a pilgrimage center around 1470.
        >
        > "The second layer is much more local, related to the region of
        Pachacamac and we have what we traditionally interpret as family
        burials," Eeckhout said. "In the same mummy bundle, we have one male,
        one female and the children. We are currently excavating these
        mummies."
        >
        > He said his team had found several sealed tombs that they had not
        yet breached, and a third level with mummified remains from an even
        earlier period. This year's excavation season ends this month, he
        added, and the excavation site will be filled in to protect it until
        digging resumes next year. - Sapa-AP
        > http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?
        set_id=1&click_id=588&art_id=qw111630744330B216
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Warmest Regards,
        > Paul Bader
        > Atlantean Records
        >
        >
        > __________________________________________________
        > Do You Yahoo!?
        > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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