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Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] Re: beringian walk

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  • mike white
    ... From: Jonathon Blake To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2004 1:40 AM Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] Re:
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 18, 2004
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      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, December 19, 2004 1:40 AM
      Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] Re: beringian walk


      Mike wrote:

      [quote]  What men choose to do for machismo, is not always what they
      would have their wives and daughters endure. [/quote]

      The rituals that the Masai, and similar groups do, are rites of
      passage.  Nothing to do with machismo.
       
         this rite proves bravery to be accepted into manhood

      >or migrate to Asia.

      The problem with the "migrate to Asia" theory, is how did they get to
      the Americas in the first place?  A walk across the Bering strait to
      get to the America's, and then back, when conditions became too
      unpleasant?
      Or are you suggesting the original inhabitants came by boat from
      Europe and Africa?
       
       
         europe is perhaps the youngest continent, as far as the deposits of humanity have so far shown.  how did they get to africa?  or must we assume that man only appeared there, and it was related to the monkeys and apes being there?  there have been found fossils of very early hominids in several remote locations, far removed from africa, and on islands.   i think its possible that man appeared in the americas as early as africa, particularly if we specify  a higher level of development above proto-human.  what evidence is there for humans in siberia and china before the americas? 

      >boats are one of the simplest and earliest of man's inventions

      The problem with tribal migration is one of getting the clan to move
      at the same speed.  How are their "possessions" moved.  Food, water,
      blankets, domesticated animals, etc.
       
         rafts can be towed or sailed, they can have 'possessions' and provisions on them, and a fewer number would be needed if they were reused to ferry others from island to island.  people can live off their walking livestock, for both milk, meat, and blood. 

      >A line of islands once connected japan to the Americas. 

      Not much island hopping is needed. From the West coast of Alaska, one
      can see the East coast of Asia, during the summer.  The big question
      would be how the "migrators" knew to go north, and west, to get to a
      "safer" place to live. 
       
         north has not always been in the direction it is now.  this passage may have been known when the climate in that area was mild and temperate.  perhaps the larger number got there traveling what now is south or west.  i contend the migration was as much related to climate change as safety from predators, but both could have been causes, or it could as easily have been the scarcity of game after the cataclysm that ended the megafauna in the americas became no longer able to support the population density in the americas.  this would restore man's bravery and his willingness to raise a family among the predators.  this migration need not have been only after the 10,000 bce event, since there were other ice-ages before that impacting man in the americas.  there is reason to think that the mongolians may have went to asia earlier.    
       


      A boat will work for however many people can fit into it.  Given what
      is known about technology 10 000 years ago, two possibilities exist:
      a) A wooden raft, tied together with vines.
      b) Hollowed out tree trunks, used as canoes.

      The former would allow more people, but the latter would be more
      stable, warmer, and "preserve" their goods.  [Either everything is
      lost, or nothing is lost.]

      >cross to Asia by swimming all the way

      85 kilometers, in freezing water, obstructed with ice bergs?

      OTOH, the  Diomede Islands might make useful stopping points.
       
      xan

      jonathon
       
      i was joking about swimming.  i think keen eyesight would be needed to see asia from america, even if only 85km. 
      regards
      mike
       
       
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