Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

inca

Expand Messages
  • mike white
    ftp://sailor.gutenberg.org/pub/gutenberg/etext98/hcpru10a.txt Pachacamac, a town situated on the coast, at least a hundred leagues
    Message 1 of 13 , Aug 11, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
       
       
      <!--StartFragment--> " Pachacamac, a town situated on the coast, at least a hundred
      leagues distant from Caxamalca. It was consecrated as the seat of
      the great temple of the deity of that name, whom the Peruvians
      worshipped as the Creator of the world.  It is said that they
      found there altars raised to this god, on their first occupation
      of the country; and, such was the veneration in which he was held
      by the natives, that the Incas, instead of attempting to abolish
      his worship, deemed it more prudent to sanction it conjointly
      with that of their own deity, the Sun. "
       
         it may be remembered  that the frisians worshipped a deity they called 'world'.  it seems that pachacamac was similar or the same deity, and preceded the worship of the sun in peru.  while this supports the idea that the frisians had came to peru at an early date, it seems to indicate that the inca were not originally frisian.  this thought can be removed by realizing that much time may have elapsed since the original landing, and during the interim the frisians had settled in quito.  religion, language, and culture can undergo tremendous changes during centuries of separation.  the recording of history sufferred after writing was made illegal by an early peruvian emperor.  from this we may find writing persisted in ecuador until the inca conquest just a few decades before the arrival of the spanish.  there were at least four dialects of quechua, denoting long separation of factions of the inca. 
         much suggests that an immense quantity of gold is still secreted around cuzco.    Atahuallpa, was a usurper of the empire from quito, and was not aware of the locations where the greatest treasures were hidden.  this was stated by his half brother, the legitimate emperor of peru.  another tale told a few decades after the conquest tells of an underground chamber within a hundred paces of a dwelling in cuzco, that contained numerous huge statues of gold of each inca emperor.  the spanish wife of an inca noble saw them, but was blindfolded, so unable to say where it was located.  many large emeralds were ruined from the mistaken notion that true gemstones can withstand blows from a hammer.  this stupidity persisted even thru the 19th c in america, with many rubies and emeralds destroyed this way in north carolina. 
         the hundreds of miles of canals and aquaducts of the incas were a grand accomplishment.  any visitor should see them, and visit Caxamalca to have a hot spring bath and see the room that was filled with gold for a ransom, with the red line still visible nine feet above the floor on the wall.  i would be tempted to take a metal detector into peru, but realize that i would have to stay within the law. 
         it is noteworthy that both the inca and aztec worshipped the sun, moon, and venus.  they knew the moon's light was borrowed.  in itself this may not seem remarkable, since many nations did the same, but they did not bother with the other planets, a singular instance.  cayce said that the aztecs were led astray into human sacrifices from their contact with the lost tribes.  given the number of nations and diverse people that the aztecs met along their migrations, its no wonder that their culture was changed so much that it is hardly recognizable when compared to the inca of quito and peru. 
         in early times quito was much larger than just the present city, just as florida, louisiana, and virginia embraced territories that included many states.  after cuzco and tiwanaku, quito is the area richest for archaelogical excavation.  it offers the best chance for finding written archives.  we must not undervalue the quipus, after all if we can say so much with an alphabet of 26 letters, why should we deny that they could be as concise with as many different color strands, plus maybe as many variety of knots.  our vanity and ignorance has kept us from looking deeper. 
       
       
      regards
      mike
       
       
       
       
       
    • mike white
      Map of Tenochtitlán,1538. Joaquin Garcia Icazbalceta, Colección de documentos Benson Latin American Collection, The University of Texas at Austin
      Message 2 of 13 , Aug 11, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
         
        Map of Tenochtitlán,1538.
        Joaquin Garcia Icazbalceta, Colección de documentos
        Benson Latin American Collection, The University of Texas at Austin
         
         
         
        mike
         
         
      • mike white
        i have looked over the four primary sources on the inca contained in markham s translations. molina was first, he wrote two books, one on history - which was
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 7 12:57 PM
        • 0 Attachment
           
             i have looked over the four primary sources on the inca contained in markham's translations.  molina was first, he wrote two books, one on history - which was lost, and this one on religious rites.  i found it boring and quit.  the second touches on history, by a half-breed inca, but it seems to have much error and nonsense - like the inca used cradle boards on indian babies, so that their flat head would make them dumber and easier to control. 
             dr legner, you being so good with spanish, and able to access wonderful libraries, could maybe find and review montesinos on the inca kings and chronology.  the book is long out of print, at least in english.  i think it may cause one to reconsider how long the inca have been in south america. 
             the traditions have two inca appearing near lake titicaca, brother and sister. they brought a high culture and civilized what became the inca empire.  a dna and genetics expert could determine when these separated from the culture they walked away from - which i believe to be quito.  they can get a fairly accurate date from the number of mutations or whatever, if they can single out a trace of inca genes in the current natives.  there may have never been over 50,000 true inca in peru, and possibly 10 million indians.  
             tracing the inca is made easier because they were said to be white.  i wish i could tell which primary source to find it, but forget.  this truth was suppressed by the conquistadors.  in northwest peru while they were excavating a massive ruin of a former city, maybe kulap, they visited a tribe in the nearby mountains, and found many were white.  the chachapuya [sic] ruins that gene savoy explored were said to be built by white natives, given by garcilaso.  so these areas may be the point of origin for the two inca founders of the inca empire.  it must be noted that these lands ownership is disputed between ecuador and peru.  probably part of greater quito originally, but later conquered by the peruvian incas.  i think its possible that a high culture may be found in these northern parts dating back as much as 10,000 years.  great discoveries may be made there.  offshore near guayaquil has sunken cities says harold wilkins.  its just a matter of time until the andes becomes the favorite digs of the archaeologists.  their slowness to realize this will embarass them later.      
           
           
          Kind regards,
          Mike White
          http://all-ez.com/yahoo-groups.htm
           
           
        • luis_browne
          Very interesting, Mike. You know that Columbus also recorded finding white Indians in Venezuela. ... in markham s translations. molina was first, he wrote
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 7 1:45 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Very interesting, Mike. You know that Columbus also recorded finding
            "white Indians" in Venezuela.

            --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "mike white"
            <infoplz@c...> wrote:
            >
            > i have looked over the four primary sources on the inca contained
            in markham's translations. molina was first, he wrote two books, one
            on history - which was lost, and this one on religious rites. i found
            it boring and quit. the second touches on history, by a half-breed
            inca, but it seems to have much error and nonsense - like the inca
            used cradle boards on indian babies, so that their flat head would
            make them dumber and easier to control.
            > dr legner, you being so good with spanish, and able to access
            wonderful libraries, could maybe find and review montesinos on the
            inca kings and chronology. the book is long out of print, at least in
            english. i think it may cause one to reconsider how long the inca
            have been in south america.
            > the traditions have two inca appearing near lake titicaca,
            brother and sister. they brought a high culture and civilized what
            became the inca empire. a dna and genetics expert could determine
            when these separated from the culture they walked away from - which i
            believe to be quito. they can get a fairly accurate date from the
            number of mutations or whatever, if they can single out a trace of
            inca genes in the current natives. there may have never been over
            50,000 true inca in peru, and possibly 10 million indians.
            > tracing the inca is made easier because they were said to be
            white. i wish i could tell which primary source to find it, but
            forget. this truth was suppressed by the conquistadors. in northwest
            peru while they were excavating a massive ruin of a former city, maybe
            kulap, they visited a tribe in the nearby mountains, and found many
            were white. the chachapuya [sic] ruins that gene savoy explored were
            said to be built by white natives, given by garcilaso. so these areas
            may be the point of origin for the two inca founders of the inca
            empire. it must be noted that these lands ownership is disputed
            between ecuador and peru. probably part of greater quito originally,
            but later conquered by the peruvian incas. i think its possible that
            a high culture may be found in these northern parts dating back as
            much as 10,000 years. great discoveries may be made there. offshore
            near guayaquil has sunken cities says harold wilkins. its just a
            matter of time until the andes becomes the favorite digs of the
            archaeologists. their slowness to realize this will embarass them
            later.
            >
            >
            > Kind regards,
            > Mike White
            > http://all-ez.com/yahoo-groups.htm
          • mike white
            previous link article again : the Aymaraes were sacerdotally ordained successors to the first Inka, as the Inka aristocracy. The correlations are many.
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 5, 2005
            • 0 Attachment
               
              previous link article again :
               
              " the Aymaraes were sacerdotally ordained successors to the first Inka, as the Inka aristocracy. The correlations are many. "
               
                 author states three races predominated in peru, the chinchas, aymara, and the huanacan.  the last had the greater elongated heads, but its reported that the aymara had elongation to a lesser extent.  i doubt that this is true.  the current population of bolivia is mostly aymara, and it has maintained purity and less race mixing than any of the other - yet the racial type has a round head, short, stocky, with barrel chests.   the inca were not identified with the remains of the three races studied, and are another racial group of northern white.  the elongated skull huanaca people sound worthy of more study.  had the royal inka been aymara, would they select quechua as a national tongue?   the colonial chroniclers did not mention the inca had an elongated skull, only that they were white.  im satisfied the inca were frisian, with some magyar lines. 
                 the advent of dolichocephalic sages may have been in stages over a longer period, such as the time of poleshift in 26,000 bce, but most seem to have brought culture to the nations near the disaster of 10,000 bce.  by 5,000 bce this race was dying out in most areas, and candidates for priesthood may have had cradle boards applied to maintain the faith and control over the masses.   only in north africa did the racial type persist to modern times - all in my opinion. 
               
               
              Kind regards,
              Mike White
              http://all-ez.com/yahoo-groups.htm
               
               
            • mike white
              some good pics of machu picchu. unless im mistaken, it looks like some buildings had a gable roof, others may have never been roofed. note how one side of
              Message 6 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
              • 0 Attachment
                 
                   some good pics of machu picchu.  unless im mistaken, it looks like some buildings had a gable roof, others may have never been roofed.  note how one side of the tops of the walls had steps built-in.  note the odd-shaped walls like a maze stairs near the bottom of the photo.  these look like they never were roofed, in fact the tops may be hieroglyphic symbols or letters.  i cant think of another reason why they were so oddly shaped.  we would have to refer to poma's drawings of the inca tunic's writing to see if we can find matches. 
                   i will soon be busy moving south, so may not be as active for awhile. 
                 
                 
                 
                Kind regards,
                Mike White
                http://all-ez.com/yahoo-groups.htm
                 
                a man might disbelieve something, and prove himself correct. 
                another man, believing, caused it to be given to him.
              • mobydoc
                G day mike white ; Could the gabled roofs been covered with thatch or metal...if it was metal ...was it gold ...I believe there was a thatch beetle that came
                Message 7 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
                • 0 Attachment
                         G'day  mike white ;
                       
                  Could the gabled roofs been covered with thatch or metal...if it was metal ...was it gold ...I believe there was a thatch beetle that came down at night and did the same ...as those other beetles did to that city in the gobe desert (entered the  human bodys ) just wondering !
                   
                                                  Pat/Moby
                  -------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   
                     some good pics of machu picchu.  unless im mistaken, it looks like some buildings had a gable roof, others may have never been roofed.  note how one side of the tops of the walls had steps built-in.  note the odd-shaped walls like a maze stairs near the bottom of the photo.  these look like they never were roofed, in fact the tops may be hieroglyphic symbols or letters.  i cant think of another reason why they were so oddly shaped.  we would have to refer to poma's drawings of the inca tunic's writing to see if we can find matches. 
                     i will soon be busy moving south, so may not be as active for awhile. 
                   
                   
                   
                  Kind regards,
                  Mike White
                  http://all-ez.com/yahoo-groups.htm
                   
                  a man might disbelieve something, and prove himself correct. 
                  another man, believing, caused it to be given to him.
                • Joan Butcher
                  If the scribe has nightmares about spiders tonight,the sound you will hear will be a phantom squadron of Confederate cavalry coming to rase your town!! Cheers,
                  Message 8 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
                  • 0 Attachment
                    If the scribe has nightmares about spiders tonight,the
                    sound you will hear will be a phantom squadron of
                    Confederate cavalry coming to rase your town!!
                    Cheers,
                    Bob
                    --- mobydoc <patcobb@...> wrote:

                    > G'day mike white ;
                    >
                    > Could the gabled roofs been covered with thatch or
                    > metal...if it was metal ...was it gold ...I believe
                    > there was a thatch beetle that came down at night
                    > and did the same ...as those other beetles did to
                    > that city in the gobe desert (entered the human
                    > bodys ) just wondering !
                    >
                    > Pat/Moby
                    >
                    >
                    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    >
                    > some good pics of machu picchu. unless im
                    > mistaken, it looks like some buildings had a gable
                    > roof, others may have never been roofed. note how
                    > one side of the tops of the walls had steps
                    > built-in. note the odd-shaped walls like a maze
                    > stairs near the bottom of the photo. these look
                    > like they never were roofed, in fact the tops may be
                    > hieroglyphic symbols or letters. i cant think of
                    > another reason why they were so oddly shaped. we
                    > would have to refer to poma's drawings of the inca
                    > tunic's writing to see if we can find matches.
                    > i will soon be busy moving south, so may not be
                    > as active for awhile.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    http://www.sharpestpictures.com/pictures/Ancient/IncaTribe/IncaTribe2.html
                    >
                    >
                    > Kind regards,
                    > Mike White
                    > http://all-ez.com/yahoo-groups.htm
                    >
                    > a man might disbelieve something, and prove
                    > himself correct.
                    > another man, believing, caused it to be given to
                    > him.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Hosted by http://all-ez.com/epigraphy.htm
                    > Group Site : http://www.epigraphyusa.com
                    > To unsubscribe from this group, although we hope
                    > you stay and help us improve. First consider
                    > changing to daily digest, or no mail - web only,
                    > visit main and edit membership :
                    >
                    >
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Precolumbian_Inscriptions
                    > if you must leave send an email to:
                    >
                    >
                    Precolumbian_Inscriptions-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > SPONSORED LINKS Online social science degree
                    > Social science course Social science degree
                    > Social science education Bachelor of social
                    > science Social science major
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
                    >
                    > a.. Visit your group
                    > "Precolumbian_Inscriptions" on the web.
                    >
                    > b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an
                    > email to:
                    >
                    >
                    Precolumbian_Inscriptions-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the
                    > Yahoo! Terms of Service.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    >
                    >




                    ____________________________________________________
                    Do you Yahoo!?
                    Messenger 7.0: Free worldwide PC to PC calls
                    http://au.messenger.yahoo.com
                  • mike white
                    early chroniclers reported the inca buildings were thatched. the assassin bug is still a danger under these types of roofs. mike ... From: mobydoc To:
                    Message 9 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
                    • 0 Attachment
                       
                         early chroniclers reported the inca buildings were thatched.  the assassin bug is still a danger under these types of roofs.   
                       
                      mike
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: mobydoc
                      Sent: Tuesday, November 22, 2005 10:58 PM
                      Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] inca

                             G'day  mike white ;
                           
                      Could the gabled roofs been covered with thatch or metal...if it was metal ...was it gold ...I believe there was a thatch beetle that came down at night and did the same ...as those other beetles did to that city in the gobe desert (entered the  human bodys ) just wondering !
                       
                                                      Pat/Moby
                    • jdaintira@aol.com
                      In a message dated 11/22/2005 8:26:33 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time, infoplz@comcast.net writes: unless im mistaken, it looks like some buildings had a gable
                      Message 10 of 13 , Nov 22, 2005
                      • 0 Attachment
                        In a message dated 11/22/2005 8:26:33 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time, infoplz@... writes:
                        unless im mistaken, it looks like some buildings had a gable roof, others may have never been roofed.  note how one side of the tops of the walls had steps built-in.  note the odd-shaped walls like a maze stairs near the bottom of the photo.  these look like they never were roofed
                        Dear Mike,
                         
                        Thank you, I had fallen asleep in my big chair this evening, dreaming that I was back at Machu Picchu.  So wonderful to see this beautiful image when I logged on.
                         
                        Yes, some of the roofs are what we might refer to as gabled.  The current belief is that there were storage lofts above.  The thatch was tied on and the ropes connected to the wooden poles which jut out.
                         
                        (Not a fantasy of archaeologists.  The town of Ollantaytambo is much as it was in Inca days and this is how it is still done there and in many of the villages.)
                         
                        There are open air temples on the left side of the photo as well as structures that were roofed with thatch throughout (some recreated examples are in the photo.) 
                         
                        Many of the buildings are connected in such a way that it is necessary to go a long way around to get into the complex.
                         
                        The small stairs going up the sides of the buildings were used as a short cut by the official runners, the Chasqui, when they were bringing dispatches to the Emperor.
                         
                        While the complex may be ( I am certain was) much older that the more modern line of Incas, they certainly added to and used it.  This was one of  the summer homes of the greatest of the Incan Emperors, Pachacutti.
                         
                        The long stairway near the bottom of the photo connects several levels of the complex, which is built on a saddle part way down the mountain.
                         
                        There is extensive agricultural terracing behind the photographer as well as below the complex to the right.  Because the photo shows the main plaza on the saddle, the numerous levels are not so apparent.
                         
                        That stairway is very narrow, and I cannot think of any reason to roof it and doubt that it ever was.
                         
                        There are some fascinating carved structures that could be symbols under the Torreon ( with the curved wall) as well as a carved condor in the now named Condor Temple which is off  to the right and not shown in this photo.
                         
                        Oh, my, I just have to find the money and heal my legs go back.
                         
                        ~ Judith Marie
                      • mike white
                        i noticed the ledge that the loft rested upon in the photo. after i posted about the odd shaped walls on the stairs, i began thinking that water may have
                        Message 11 of 13 , Nov 23, 2005
                        • 0 Attachment
                           
                             i noticed the ledge that the loft rested upon in the photo. 
                             after i posted about the odd shaped walls on the stairs, i began thinking that water may have coursed down there at times, and the odd walls may have been slowing or controlling it. 
                             this narrow stairs : was there a reason for these walls to be at odd angles?   
                             pachacuti : isnt he the one whose name means time of disaster or change? 
                             judith, i join you in wishing to be touring the ruins and relics, amid the stunning andean scenery.  spend a few nights gazing at the heavens near titicaca.  the thin air, and
                          elevation, is said to be wonderful for seeing the stars. 
                             ive heard the living cost in the andes for tourists is about the same as in usa?  this is disappointing, for my budget may not allow me to stay as long as i need, to see the things i want.  there is a good chance i will spend extra time at ica and paracas, and the northern coastal valley ruins may need a week at least. 
                             judith, did you take a tour package for several sites?  i expect to hire guides close to each site for better rates.   
                          any advice to us prospective travelers is appreciated. 
                           
                          mike
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Wednesday, November 23, 2005 1:16 AM
                          Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] inca

                          In a message dated 11/22/2005 8:26:33 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time, infoplz@... writes:
                          unless im mistaken, it looks like some buildings had a gable roof, others may have never been roofed.  note how one side of the tops of the walls had steps built-in.  note the odd-shaped walls like a maze stairs near the bottom of the photo.  these look like they never were roofed
                          Dear Mike,
                           
                          Thank you, I had fallen asleep in my big chair this evening, dreaming that I was back at Machu Picchu.  So wonderful to see this beautiful image when I logged on.
                           
                          Yes, some of the roofs are what we might refer to as gabled.  The current belief is that there were storage lofts above.  The thatch was tied on and the ropes connected to the wooden poles which jut out.
                           
                          (Not a fantasy of archaeologists.  The town of Ollantaytambo is much as it was in Inca days and this is how it is still done there and in many of the villages.)
                           
                          There are open air temples on the left side of the photo as well as structures that were roofed with thatch throughout (some recreated examples are in the photo.) 
                           
                          Many of the buildings are connected in such a way that it is necessary to go a long way around to get into the complex.
                           
                          The small stairs going up the sides of the buildings were used as a short cut by the official runners, the Chasqui, when they were bringing dispatches to the Emperor.
                           
                          While the complex may be ( I am certain was) much older that the more modern line of Incas, they certainly added to and used it.  This was one of  the summer homes of the greatest of the Incan Emperors, Pachacutti.
                           
                          The long stairway near the bottom of the photo connects several levels of the complex, which is built on a saddle part way down the mountain.
                           
                          There is extensive agricultural terracing behind the photographer as well as below the complex to the right.  Because the photo shows the main plaza on the saddle, the numerous levels are not so apparent.
                           
                          That stairway is very narrow, and I cannot think of any reason to roof it and doubt that it ever was.
                           
                          There are some fascinating carved structures that could be symbols under the Torreon ( with the curved wall) as well as a carved condor in the now named Condor Temple which is off  to the right and not shown in this photo.
                           
                          Oh, my, I just have to find the money and heal my legs go back.
                           
                          ~ Judith Marie
                           
                        • jdaintira@aol.com
                          In a message dated 11/23/2005 1:35:46 A.M. US Mountain Standard Time, infoplz@comcast.net writes: the odd shaped walls on the stairs, i began thinking that
                          Message 12 of 13 , Nov 23, 2005
                          • 0 Attachment
                            In a message dated 11/23/2005 1:35:46 A.M. US Mountain Standard Time, infoplz@... writes:
                            the odd shaped walls on the stairs, i began thinking that water may have coursed down there at times, and the odd walls may have been slowing or controlling it. 
                             
                            Not really.  There were and are extensive connected water channels which were used to irrigate the terraces.  A group from the University of Denver has been studying these for over a dozen years. 
                             
                            One of the main water courses does run down the center of a wider set of stairs near the Torreon and there is a pool there with a small walkway over it.
                             
                               this narrow stairs : was there a reason for these walls to be at odd angles? 
                             
                            They really aren't. They were built to fit the terrain, but I never found them to be odd. You will see when you are on the ground there yourself. 
                             
                            ~JM
                             
                          • aumsparky@earthlink.net
                            my conception of the origin of the inca has changed over the years. it was influenced by cayce, the over the linda frisian chronicle, and the work of
                            Message 13 of 13 , Apr 5, 2012
                            • 0 Attachment
                               
                                 my conception of the origin of the inca has changed over the years.  it was influenced by cayce, the 'over the linda' frisian chronicle, and the work of phylos. 
                                 the word inca and the sun worship culture was founded by the atlanteans.  they had made peru a colony by 11,400 bce, and perhaps as early as 40,000 bce.  its probable that the traditions and culture mainly were begun by them. 
                                 circa 9750 bce, a fleet of frisians and magyar split near tunis, half led by the sea king inka headed for the americas, while the rest under nef tunis voyaged to asia minor to found tyre, in honor of thor.  over time the worship of heracles took over from thor. 
                                 not much was written of the history of these frisians and magyar after that date, but its known that tyre prospered, and the knowledge of the seas and maps were adopted by those who became the phoenicians.  an early chronicle of the conquistadors confirms that there were frisians in chile before the conquest, the araucanians.  it appears that the frisians were in decline and fewer in number, than the magyar by that date. 
                                 atlantean institutions and ways were continued by the frisians after the atlantean race died out.  it was during the rule of the frisian incas that pachamama worship began, their earth-mother.  its unknown how long the frisians ruled in peru, but it may have been a briefer period, than the later rule by the magyar. 
                                 im no language expert, but a hungarian who lived in the andes a long time reported that most of the names of the rulers, mountains, and rivers, like europe, bore magyar names.  
                                 manco capac seems to be a magyar name, and may have been used by several inca.  the tale of the founding of cuzco by him seems distorted, since cayce reported that the fortress of sacsayhuaman was built by atlanteans by 40,000 bce, and we might expect that they ruled from cuzco from that date. 
                                 there is another andean legend of the ayar brothers, that may have founded another royal line of inca rulers.  this line also had magyar roots.  inca rocca, by his name, appears to have been of magyar descent.  its likely that rocca regained the rule after a thousand years of occupation and rule by foreigners from the east, probably phoenicians from tyre, who were kindred people.  rocca was likely far enough back in time to have been a giant.  after his dynasty, those rulers who followed were either all magyar, or bore magyar names.  this is why i say the rule by the frisians may have been relatively brief, of the 12,000 years rule by the inca.  the influence of the atlanteans and magyar was much greater than that of the frisians. 
                                 the hieroglyphic writing may have began by the atlanteans.  the frisians letters were derived from a divided wheel or pie-shape, and so far no inscriptions from either have been found in the andes.  the magyar were using runes by the time they arrived in peru.  after writing was forbidden by a later inca, all traces of earlier inscriptions were destroyed.  the pictographic hieroglyphs of the atlanteans were used by these rulers in peru and mexico.  eventually, these writings may still be found in tombs.  the quipu was a form of writing that was adopted by the inca from the moche.  it could record numbers, history, and literature.  the change may in part have been because of white ants that ravaged paper documents, as well as to keep knowledge only for the ruling classes.  its possible that the later incas ordered that earlier relics be thrown into the sea. 
                                 much cultivated land was lost in peru due to elevator plate activity circa 3000 bce.  then a migration from peru went to yucatan to found the culture that became the mayan. 
                                 we should look in ecuador and chile for inscriptions and writing, for these nations kept the inca out until just before the conquest.  relics with inscriptions have been brought up from the seafloor by divers, in a city lost to the sea off guayaquil ecuador.  wilkins met a man in 1945 who had a collection of these relics, that included statuettes, inscriptions, and optical lenses.  i spoke with a man from there in recent years, who reported that this is true.  ecuador was likely the ophir of solomon.  part of the wonderful crespi collection can still be seen at cuenca. 
                                 i believe that this report is closer to the truth than that taught by our academics, so offer it for your consideration. 
                                
                              mike white
                               
                               
                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.