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Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] conquest of peru

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  • Mobydoc
    Hy Mike; ( its incredible that they could construct such great buildings of stone, so finely joined and using tons of gold and silver, only to thatch every
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 1, 2004
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         Hy Mike;
       
        (   its incredible that they could construct such great buildings of stone, so finely joined and using tons of gold and silver, only to thatch every roof with straw  )
       
          Isn't so funny that that most people can't see that one simple fact (straw)...
         and yet they believe that huge dish's were made to focus  the Suns rays ...
          Its that horse and water parable all over again ^!^
       
                          Pat/Moby
    • mike
      grand chimu was the greatest city in south america. gold worth a million dollars was removed from one tomb shortly after the conquest. Of the ancient
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 1, 2004
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          grand chimu was the greatest city in south america.  gold worth a million dollars was removed from one tomb shortly after the conquest. 

        "  Of the ancient aboriginal city, or group of towns, whose ruins ~and burial-places cover the plain on every side of Trujillo, comparatively little is definitely known. The extent of these ruins, which cover an area 12 to 15 m. long by 5 to 6 m. wide, demonstrate that it was much the largest Indian city on the southern continent. The principal ruins are 4 m. north of Trujillo, but others lie more to the eastward and still others southward of the banks of the Moche. The great aqueduct, which brought water to the several large reservoirs of the city, was 14 m. long and in some places in crossing the Chimu Va]ley it had an elevation of 60 ft.

        The name of Grand Chimu is usually given to the ruined city, this being the title applied to the chief of the people, who were called the Chimu, or Yuncas. They were a race wholly distinct from the Incas, by whom they were finally conquered. They spoke a different language and had developed an altogether different civilization, and it is not unreasonable to presume that they were related to some earlier race of southern Mexico. Specimens of skilfully wrought ornaments of gold and silver, artistically made pottery, and finely woven fabrics of cotton and wool (alpaca), have been found in their huacas, or burial-places. Bronze was known to them, and from it tools and weapons were made. Their extensive irrigation works show that they were painstaking agriculturists, and that they were successful ones may be assumed from the size of the population maintained in so arid a region. "

        Regards,
        Mike White
        http://all-ez.com
        http://all-ez.com/yahoo-groups.htm

         

         

      • mike
        the inca observed some of the same customs of the old world which were unique in the americas, such as burnt offering sacrifices, fasting, and the augury from
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 2, 2004
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             the inca observed some of the same customs of the old world which were unique in the americas, such as burnt offering sacrifices, fasting, and the augury from entrails. 
             its incredible that they could construct such great buildings of stone, so finely joined and using tons of gold and silver, only to thatch every roof with straw. 
           
          A fire was then kindled by means of a concave mirror of polished
          metal, which, collecting the rays of the sun into a focus upon a
          quantity of dried cotton, speedily set it on fire.  It was the
          expedient used on the like occasions in ancient Rome, at least
          under the reign of the pious Numa.  When the sky was overcast,
          and the face of the good deity was hidden from his worshippers,
          which was esteemed a bad omen, fire was obtained by means of
          friction.  The sacred flame was intrusted to the care of the
          Virgins of the Sun, " 
           
             these vestal virgins tending the sacred fire in common with roman practice may tend to confirm that both inherited this practice from the frisians.  the use of the concave mirror is surprisingly high-tech. 
             the chimu having bronze is also a first in the americas, and suggests diffusion from the old world. 
             its puzzling that the incas have their first sun temple, and legends of their beginning connected with an island in lake titicaca.  it makes me wonder if they resided in that area before it was submerged and uplifted.  we can neither prove nor deny that the events of atlantis submerging, the submergence of much of peru, and the uplift of the plateau, happened at the same time, or over years or centuries.   the lack of evidence of sun worship among the valley city-states seems to point to the inca being there before the uplift. 
             the basis for believing the inca arrived during the 12th c ce is shaky and so far ive not found any substance, other than legends that are confused and contradictory.  its not sure if their entrace to peru was then, or the march of conquest.  the meagre royal dynastic line doesnt even account for over 250 years. 
              if we only had clues to the language used by the inca only among themselves.  i bet its related to the script reported to be on their tunics and sashes, and also found on stone monuments and statues thought to be over 5,000 years old.  why else would they wear it on the royal personages? 
           
           
           
           
        • mike
          long after the Conquest, the spots continued to be pointed out where the seminaries had existed for their instruction. These were placed under the care of
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 2, 2004
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            "  long after the Conquest, the spots
            continued to be pointed out where the seminaries had existed for
            their instruction.  These were placed under the care of the
            amautas, or "wise men," who engrossed the scanty stock of science
            - if science it could be called - possessed by the Peruvians, and
            who were the sole teachers of youth.  It was natural that the
            monarch should take a lively interest in the instruction of the
            young nobility, his own kindred. Several of the Peruvian princes
            are said to have built their palaces in the neighbourhood of the
            schools, in order that they might the more easily visit them and
            listen to the lectures of the amautas, which they occasionally
            reinforced by a homily of their own. *2 In these schools, the
            royal pupils were instructed in all the different kinds of
            knowledge in which their teachers were versed, with especial
            reference to the stations they were to occupy in after-life.
            They studied the laws, and the principles of administering the
            government, in which many of them were to take part.  They were
            initiated in the peculiar rites of their religion, most necessary
            to those who were to assume the sacerdotal functions.  They
            learned also to emulate the achievements of their royal ancestors
            by listening to the chronicles compiled by the amautas.  They
            were taught to speak their own dialect with purity and elegance;
            and they became acquainted with the mysterious science of the
            quipus, which supplied the Peruvians with the means of
            communicating their ideas to one another, and of transmitting
            them to future generations. *3

            [Footnote 2: Ibid., Parte 1, lib 7, cap. 10.  The descendant of
            the Incas notices the remains, visible in his day, or two of the
            palaces of his royal ancestors, which had been built in the
            vicinity of the schools, for more easy access to them.]

            [Footnote 3: Ibid., Parte 1, lib. 4, cap. 19]

            The quipu was a cord about two feet long, composed of different
            colored threads tightly twisted together, from which a quantity
            of smaller threads were suspended in the manner of a fringe.  The
            threads were of different colors and were tied into knots.  The
            word quipu, indeed, signifies a knot. The colors denoted sensible
            objects; as, for instance, white represented silver, and yellow,
            gold.  They sometimes also stood for abstract ideas. Thus, white
            signified peace, and red, war.  But the quipus were chiefly used
            for arithmetical purposes.  The knots served instead of ciphers,
            and could be combined in such a manner as to represent numbers to
            any amount they required. By means of these they went through
            their calculations with great rapidity, and the Spaniards who
            first visited the country bear testimony to their accuracy. *4

            [Footnote 4: Conq. i Pob. del Piru, Ms. - Sarmiento, Relacion,
            Ms., cap. 9. - Acosta, lib. 6, cap. 8. - Garcilasso Parte 1, lib.
            6, cap. 8.]

            Officers were established in each of the districts, who, under
            the title of quipucamayus, or "keepers of the quipus," were
            required to furnish the government with information on various
            important matters.  One had charge of the revenues, reported the
            quantity of raw material distributed among the laborers, the
            quality and quantity of the fabrics made from it, and the amount
            of stores, of various kinds, paid into the royal magazines.
            Another exhibited the register of births and deaths, the
            marriages, the number of those qualified to bear arms, and the
            like details in reference to the population of the kingdom.
            These returns were annually forwarded to the capital, where they
            were submitted to the inspection of officers acquainted with the
            art of deciphering these mystic records.  The government was thus
            provided with a valuable mass of statistical information, and the
            skeins of many-colored threads, collected and carefully
            preserved, constituted what might be called the national
            archives. *5  " 
             
              some great art and images, including humboldt
             
             
             


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