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Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] Re: velasco

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  • enrico mattievich
    A fragment of stele found in Chavín de Huántar, Peru, by Julio C. Tello, showing part of an engraved Assyrian style god (under his feet it is possible to
    Message 1 of 18 , Jun 17, 2012
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      A fragment of stele found in Chavín de Huántar, Peru, by Julio C. Tello, showing part of an engraved Assyrian style god (under his feet it is possible to distinguish several Greek letters of an inscription) it is similar to some sculptures in the Father Crespi collection, in Ecuador.


      http://phoenicia.org/byblosmart.html   "Could Chavin's Labyrinth be the Remains of the Resounding Palace of Hades and Persephone? [Part 2]"

      Enrico

      2012/6/17 mike white <michael.white511@...>
       

       
      hi stan, all
       
         glad to hear from you again stan.  its disappointing that no library was found.  even without that, the relics that were shown online in the crespi collection, show many fascinating glimpses of former high cultures in ecuador.  its a shame that the collection was broken up and scattered.  many pieces will be lost to us.  
         there are likely lost gold and emerald mines in ecuador.  rivers flowing to the east from it are aurific, but the motherlode is now unknown.  not sure how much mining is now done.  even platinum occurs there. 
         i wonder what products the ancient phoenicians could have traded for gold and emeralds?  they must have been perishable.  lacking products of high enough value to trade may have caused invasions and looting. 
         early accurate maps show wonderful detail of the contour of ice-free antarctica, and upper canada - so the ancient navigators may have known of the route around cape horn and thru the drake passage.  the book by hapgood is worth reading, 'the maps of the ancient sea kings', the title suggests that author may have had a hint they were by the frisians. 
         there were too many mentions of ancient tunnels to be ignored.  maybe lava tubes were meant.  there could be many of these underground in ecuador.  some of these may have been modified and used for storage and caching relics. 
       
      mike
       
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Stan
      Sent: Saturday, June 16, 2012 10:25 AM
      Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] Re: velasco

       

      Sorry Lads,

      When it comes to metallic libraries in Ecuador, so far, Petronio Jaramillo made it all up well before Juan Moricz appeared on the scene in the 1960's. Then came along the greatest liar of them all, Erich Von Daniken, to spread the falsehoods in his book, Gold of the Gods. I listened to Juan Moricz rant and rave about his hatred of Erich for many hours in the early 1980's.

      I've interviewed all of the players in this story for the last 25 years. Did you know there was a professional Japanese Tayos expedition in the 90's? They penetrated 15 kilometers into the cave!

      I've been in the main Tayos Cave, and also in Stanley Hall's Tayos Cave on the Pastaza River (Tayos Gold). I have it all on video. I know all of the Shuar Natives who live near both caves. I have questioned them extensively.

      As much as I would love the "metallic library" story to be true, it simply is not. That said, I do agree with Mike about the ancient and largely unknown history of Ecuador. There is still much to be discovered here.

      Two months ago, we conducted an expedition into an area just north of Cajas National Park on private property. It took 8 hours to arrive on horseback. We were escorted to this archaeological site by the property owner. It turned out to be a very large and remote "lost city" (one of the first phases of the Canari culture). The site is approximately 5 times larger than Ingapirca. There were five caves on this property. Each cave contained abundant quantities of ceramic archaeological material.

      These lost and remote sites are out there and I will continue to investigate each and every one that comes to my attention. Like most of you, I seek to understand the great ancient mysteries of South America.

      Stan Grist
      www.Adventure-Trader.com

      --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "james m clark jr" <mirageinspectorjay@...> wrote:
      >
      > metal libraries? I assume that would require some tin from the Bolivian tin mines I've never found to much history of in the english language. Although I must admit time has always been an illusive factor for me dispite the fact that the Welsh symbol for 100 is basically the same as the Yuchi and other societies I dont care to mention except for the early Merovingian tradition who used metal rings to light fires. The eariler method of the nodfyr "fire of necessity" seems to be a method assumed to have come from them although I think it may predate the Roman calendar in former times when a week was reconized before the later idea at the end of antiquity.
      >
      > To a degree the customary 100 braids platted for the maternal line among the Inca is more interesting in the light that Wales wasn't obtained by war but rather birthright. That seems to basically be the bottom line for the "Prince" Madoc incentive from the mindspring of An Essay on the Druids, the Ancient Churches and the Round Towers of Ireland pub.1871 by the Welsh publication society which may provide some overlooked data. pdf also available, public domain "out of copyright" edition & also povided by google books.
      >
      > As far as simular claims that may be inaccurate or accurate regarding the Inca as far as I know are the british israelites so it may be worth wide to consider Mormon traditions & archaeology as well as take note of Brit Am and atavistic languages related Aramaic and Arabic projects espically now that some are complete or near completion.
      >
      > be well,
      > jay
      >
      > --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "mike white" <michael.white511@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > again, i invite and implore a member able to read spanish, to give the group an informal review of the work of velasco on ecuador. its my opinion that ecuador may have a history going back up to 26,000 bce. almost nothing is known of it, yet, it being last conquered by the inca, there is a possibility that more of its ancient high culture and history may still be preserved, if interest is revived. there is no copyright to worry about, so interesting sections could be quoted verbatim.
      > > the location of ancient palaces, cities, and archives are of special interest, as well as references to ophir. pottery and relics of the highest quality have been found in ecuador. the collection of the late padre crespi was incredible that he had warehoused at cuenca. one stone had archaic square hebrew script, that was precolumbian.
      > > the tales of lost tunnels and metal libraries have the ring of truth.
      > >
      > > mike
      > >
      >


    • mike white
      the sistrum is an interesting instrument. it pictures hathor, and was used to avoid floods. the egyptians were wise, having added atlantean wisdom to their
      Message 2 of 18 , Jun 18, 2012
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           the sistrum is an interesting instrument.  it pictures hathor, and was used to avoid floods.  the egyptians were wise, having added atlantean wisdom to their own. 
           i noted years ago, that the iron wand used in the 'opening the mouth' ritual was shaped to depict the stars of ursa major, the big dipper.  we have lost the significance of these objects. 
           magic, alchemy, and astrology were advanced arts in egypt.  our culture remains in its infancy.  if these items were made exactly of the proper materials, and if we knew the right words or tones, we might behold wonders. 
         
         
        File:Egyptian - Sistrum - Walters 541207.jpg
         
        mike
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, June 18, 2012 8:47 PM
        Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] Re: velasco & misc.

         

        Hi Mike, all


        I'm very interested in the new book of Seppo Tiusanen!

        A metallic object found on the North coast of Peru is
        similar to five sistrum of the Bronze Age found at Bourget
        lake dwelling, France. Similar metallic tubes was used in
        Scandinavia.

        Sistrum is a metal rattle used as musical instrument in
        the worship of Isis in ancient Egypt.

        Regards,
        Enrico 

        2012/6/18 mike white <michael.white511@...>
         

         
           i think the metallic relics of the crespi collection were crated and sent to the vatican.  at least thats what i read somewhere. 
           i will do a casual review of the book you cited on google, and post comments on my groups. 
           so the lava tubes are part of this mystery.  im not opposed to finding some gold in a streambed, but my primary focus is on learning an accurate history of the region.  i used to love backpacking and hiking mountain trails, but with age my legs are not up to it now.  im limited to short walks. 
           if i expect to get to cuenca stan, i will try to meet you for coffee, etc.  im sure we will have lots to talk about.  its great to have someone with firsthand knowledge in the group. 
           i would be interested in your book on gold hunting.  you can attach it to my group email, or web@...   i will review it for the group, and save you trouble. 
           there is a valley near quito that was covered by lava, i understand.  there may be a city buried there like pompei.  this was true in mexico. 
           the natives may have buried sites to hide them from the inca, and later the spaniards.  the quito area likely had high culture far longer than the inca period, for many thousands of years. 
         
        mike
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Stan
        Sent: Monday, June 18, 2012 9:49 AM
        Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] Re: velasco & misc.

         

        Hi Mike, all,

        The Crespi metallic relics are still an enigma. Nobody knows where they are now. They appear to be lost to the public. I will continue to try to track them down well into the future.

        The ceramic part of the collection is still in tact in the basement of the Banco Central museum in Cuenca. It is possible to arrange a private viewing of the Crespi ceramic collection. I would be pleased to organize this visit for Mike or any others in the group who come to Cuenca as I am now living here.

        I have been studying the ancient and lost gold and emerald mines in Ecuador for about 25 years. I have located many of the sites. I have discovered the exact locations of the so-called lost cities of El Dorado which all date to pre-Inca times. Since the 1500's they are known as Sevilla de Oro, Logrono, Nambija, Bilbao, Old Zamora, Santiago de las Montanas, Borja and Jaen de Bracamoras. These locations are mentioned in "The Rivers Ran East" by Leonard Clark (can be found in Google books).

        Gold mining is very active in most of these areas today. I can pan at least one gram of gold per hour in any one of these locations; in some places, much more. Even with all of the mining that has taken place over thousands of years, the surface has still not yet been scratched. The gold is more abundant than even I can believe.

        I am also in possession of 2 emeralds (authenticated by the GIA) that came from a river in the northern jungles of Ecuador. These emeralds were obtained from some Cofanes Natives in the 1960's. The old emerald mine is located in their territory. I am still hoping to organize an expedition into this area with the blessing and assistance of today's Cofane chief.

        In my next post, I will share a story of an ancient tunnel that was discovered near Banos in the 1920s. The entrance to the tunnel is through a lava tube cave. The evidence I have is overwhelming that the story is true. I have been in the cave but could not reach the tunnel do to a blockage. With some effort, the cave could be cleared. The owners are good friends and want to sell the property.

        Meanwhile, I have written a small book entitled "How and Where to Find Gold in Ecuador". I would be pleased to send a complimentary copy to anyone in this group. Just send me an email and I will attach it to the return.

        Warm Regards, Stan

        --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "mike white" <michael.white511@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > hi stan, all
        >
        > glad to hear from you again stan. its disappointing that no library was found. even without that, the relics that were shown online in the crespi collection, show many fascinating glimpses of former high cultures in ecuador. its a shame that the collection was broken up and scattered. many pieces will be lost to us.
        > there are likely lost gold and emerald mines in ecuador. rivers flowing to the east from it are aurific, but the motherlode is now unknown. not sure how much mining is now done. even platinum occurs there.
        > i wonder what products the ancient phoenicians could have traded for gold and emeralds? they must have been perishable. lacking products of high enough value to trade may have caused invasions and looting.
        > early accurate maps show wonderful detail of the contour of ice-free antarctica, and upper canada - so the ancient navigators may have known of the route around cape horn and thru the drake passage. the book by hapgood is worth reading, 'the maps of the ancient sea kings', the title suggests that author may have had a hint they were by the frisians.
        > there were too many mentions of ancient tunnels to be ignored. maybe lava tubes were meant. there could be many of these underground in ecuador. some of these may have been modified and used for storage and caching relics.
        >
        > mike
        >
        >
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Stan
        > To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Saturday, June 16, 2012 10:25 AM
        > Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] Re: velasco
        >
        >
        >
        > Sorry Lads,
        >
        > When it comes to metallic libraries in Ecuador, so far, Petronio Jaramillo made it all up well before Juan Moricz appeared on the scene in the 1960's. Then came along the greatest liar of them all, Erich Von Daniken, to spread the falsehoods in his book, Gold of the Gods. I listened to Juan Moricz rant and rave about his hatred of Erich for many hours in the early 1980's.
        >
        > I've interviewed all of the players in this story for the last 25 years. Did you know there was a professional Japanese Tayos expedition in the 90's? They penetrated 15 kilometers into the cave!
        >
        > I've been in the main Tayos Cave, and also in Stanley Hall's Tayos Cave on the Pastaza River (Tayos Gold). I have it all on video. I know all of the Shuar Natives who live near both caves. I have questioned them extensively.
        >
        > As much as I would love the "metallic library" story to be true, it simply is not. That said, I do agree with Mike about the ancient and largely unknown history of Ecuador. There is still much to be discovered here.
        >
        > Two months ago, we conducted an expedition into an area just north of Cajas National Park on private property. It took 8 hours to arrive on horseback. We were escorted to this archaeological site by the property owner. It turned out to be a very large and remote "lost city" (one of the first phases of the Canari culture). The site is approximately 5 times larger than Ingapirca. There were five caves on this property. Each cave contained abundant quantities of ceramic archaeological material.
        >
        > These lost and remote sites are out there and I will continue to investigate each and every one that comes to my attention. Like most of you, I seek to understand the great ancient mysteries of South America.
        >
        > Stan Grist
        > www.Adventure-Trader.com
        >
        > --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "james m clark jr" <mirageinspectorjay@> wrote:
        > >
        > > metal libraries? I assume that would require some tin from the Bolivian tin mines I've never found to much history of in the english language. Although I must admit time has always been an illusive factor for me dispite the fact that the Welsh symbol for 100 is basically the same as the Yuchi and other societies I dont care to mention except for the early Merovingian tradition who used metal rings to light fires. The eariler method of the nodfyr "fire of necessity" seems to be a method assumed to have come from them although I think it may predate the Roman calendar in former times when a week was reconized before the later idea at the end of antiquity.
        > >
        > > To a degree the customary 100 braids platted for the maternal line among the Inca is more interesting in the light that Wales wasn't obtained by war but rather birthright. That seems to basically be the bottom line for the "Prince" Madoc incentive from the mindspring of An Essay on the Druids, the Ancient Churches and the Round Towers of Ireland pub.1871 by the Welsh publication society which may provide some overlooked data. pdf also available, public domain "out of copyright" edition & also povided by google books.
        > >
        > > As far as simular claims that may be inaccurate or accurate regarding the Inca as far as I know are the british israelites so it may be worth wide to consider Mormon traditions & archaeology as well as take note of Brit Am and atavistic languages related Aramaic and Arabic projects espically now that some are complete or near completion.
        > >
        > > be well,
        > > jay
        > >
        > > --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "mike white" <michael.white511@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > again, i invite and implore a member able to read spanish, to give the group an informal review of the work of velasco on ecuador. its my opinion that ecuador may have a history going back up to 26,000 bce. almost nothing is known of it, yet, it being last conquered by the inca, there is a possibility that more of its ancient high culture and history may still be preserved, if interest is revived. there is no copyright to worry about, so interesting sections could be quoted verbatim.
        > > > the location of ancient palaces, cities, and archives are of special interest, as well as references to ophir. pottery and relics of the highest quality have been found in ecuador. the collection of the late padre crespi was incredible that he had warehoused at cuenca. one stone had archaic square hebrew script, that was precolumbian.
        > > > the tales of lost tunnels and metal libraries have the ring of truth.
        > > >
        > > > mike
        > > >
        > >
        >


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