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newport tower

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  • aumsparky@earthlink.net
    newport tower for centuries men have wondered who built the newport tower, and for what purpose. even say it was benedict arnold s windmill. i think it was
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 26, 2011
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      newport tower

         for centuries men have wondered who built the newport tower, and for what purpose.  even say it was benedict arnold's windmill. 

         i think it was mentioned as pre-existing in the norse sagas, circa 1000 ce, as a grain shed, reported by thorwald.  it could have been first built long before. 

         pondering the location, it was chosen well for security, being an island, and commanded the river-estuary.  the number one priority would have been erecting a lookout tower, to prepare for attack by hostile tribes, or from the river or sea.  any other use may have been secondary.  this idea can be confirmed by viewing the horizon from the tower.  if the defending force was small, the stone tower could be resorted to as a keep or fortress.  it would be fairly safe from fire, or easily rebuilt when they returned. 

      mike

       

    • william smith
      Mike   I have spent much time at the Newport Tower and investigated all the artifacts dug from the tower in 1947 by the Godfrey dig. I have read the more than
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 26, 2011
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        Mike
          I have spent much time at the Newport Tower and investigated all the artifacts dug from the tower in 1947 by the Godfrey dig. I have read the more than 200 research opinions on the tower. In summary the tower was built as follows.
        The Newport Tower was built in 1472 by Joao Cortreal (Portuguese fisherman and leader of Knights of Christ), It was built to process cod fish for the European market. The builders mark is a  small triangle stone located 17 degrees west of true north on the outside top of the tower. The triangle was a symbol used by the Knights representing The Father, The Son and the Holy Ghost. The stone was located 17 degrees west of true north because that was the magnetic declination of the tower in 1472. At one time the tower had an atrium made of wood that was around the tower. This Atrium was 4 El's out from the tower columns (12 ft.) It provided living quarters for the crew and a work platform (roof) to tend the smoker for processing fish. If you are interested in an in depth engineering finding of facts go to the web site called (Migration and Diffusion) on this site go to authors and look at William Smith papers.


        From: "aumsparky@..." <aumsparky@...>
        To: Ancient-Mysteries@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 10:25 AM
        Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

         
        newport tower
           for centuries men have wondered who built the newport tower, and for what purpose.  even say it was benedict arnold's windmill. 
           i think it was mentioned as pre-existing in the norse sagas, circa 1000 ce, as a grain shed, reported by thorwald.  it could have been first built long before. 
           pondering the location, it was chosen well for security, being an island, and commanded the river-estuary.  the number one priority would have been erecting a lookout tower, to prepare for attack by hostile tribes, or from the river or sea.  any other use may have been secondary.  this idea can be confirmed by viewing the horizon from the tower.  if the defending force was small, the stone tower could be resorted to as a keep or fortress.  it would be fairly safe from fire, or easily rebuilt when they returned. 
        mike
         


      • Frank
        Has anyone pondered the possible role that such structures may have had in navigation? It seems to me that approaching a coastline that one had only been to
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 26, 2011
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          Has anyone pondered the possible role that such structures may have had in navigation? It seems to me that approaching a coastline that one had only been to once or twice before, that it would be difficult, if not impossible, to be sure one was at the intended inlet. Since some inlets have hidden hazards, knowing exactly where one is can be crucial to safety. A unique tower would provide such assurance.

          The likelihood of the tower being a navigational aid seems to be reinforced by the placement of a stone reflecting magnetic declination.

          --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, william smith <wmsmithrock1@...> wrote:
          >
          > Mike
          >   I have spent much time at the Newport Tower and investigated all the artifacts dug from the tower in 1947 by the Godfrey dig. I have read the more than 200 research opinions on the tower. In summary the tower was built as follows.
          > The Newport Tower was built in 1472 by Joao Cortreal (Portuguese fisherman and leader of Knights of Christ), It was built to process cod fish for the European market. The builders mark is a  small triangle stone located 17 degrees west of true north on the outside top of the tower. The triangle was a symbol used by the Knights representing The Father, The Son and the Holy Ghost. The stone was located 17 degrees west of true north because that was the magnetic declination of the tower in 1472. At one time the tower had an atrium made of wood that was around the tower. This Atrium was 4 El's out from the tower columns (12 ft.) It provided living quarters for the crew and a work platform (roof) to tend the smoker for processing fish. If you are interested in an in depth engineering finding of facts go to the web site called (Migration and Diffusion) on this site go to authors and look at William Smith papers.
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: "aumsparky@..." <aumsparky@...>
          > To: Ancient-Mysteries@yahoogroups.com
          > Cc: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 10:25 AM
          > Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower
          >
          >
          >  
          > newport tower
          >    for centuries men have wondered who built the
          > newport tower, and for what purpose.  even say it was benedict arnold's
          > windmill. 
          >    i think it was mentioned as pre-existing in the
          > norse sagas, circa 1000 ce, as a grain shed, reported by thorwald.  it
          > could have been first built long before. 
          >    pondering the location, it was chosen well for
          > security, being an island, and commanded the river-estuary.  the number one
          > priority would have been erecting a lookout tower, to prepare for attack by
          > hostile tribes, or from the river or sea.  any other use may have been
          > secondary.  this idea can be confirmed by viewing the horizon from the
          > tower.  if the defending force was small, the stone tower could be resorted
          > to as a keep or fortress.  it would be fairly safe from fire, or easily
          > rebuilt when they returned. 
          > mike
          >  
          >
        • aumsparky@earthlink.net
          if that is true, what did thorwald see that he took for a stone grain shed over 400 years before? this is the first report ive seen of a portuguese being
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 26, 2011
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               if that is true, what did thorwald see that he took for a stone grain shed over 400 years before?  this is the first report ive seen of a portuguese being ashore twenty years before columbus.  i dont know that its routine for the cod fishery to use a stone tower.  staying alive had to be number one priority. 
               in either case, having a raised lookout tower would have been a necessity, if no hills were convenient.  many other cultures may have used a triangle.  it may be reaching to conclude it was cortreal. 
               since you were there, does it have a commanding view from the tower?  could they see up the river or the mainland? 
               i have no adopted theory, just seeking the most likely answer. 
             
            mike
             
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 10:53 AM
            Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

             

            Mike
              I have spent much time at the Newport Tower and investigated all the artifacts dug from the tower in 1947 by the Godfrey dig. I have read the more than 200 research opinions on the tower. In summary the tower was built as follows.
            The Newport Tower was built in 1472 by Joao Cortreal (Portuguese fisherman and leader of Knights of Christ), It was built to process cod fish for the European market. The builders mark is a  small triangle stone located 17 degrees west of true north on the outside top of the tower. The triangle was a symbol used by the Knights representing The Father, The Son and the Holy Ghost. The stone was located 17 degrees west of true north because that was the magnetic declination of the tower in 1472. At one time the tower had an atrium made of wood that was around the tower. This Atrium was 4 El's out from the tower columns (12 ft.) It provided living quarters for the crew and a work platform (roof) to tend the smoker for processing fish. If you are interested in an in depth engineering finding of facts go to the web site called (Migration and Diffusion) on this site go to authors and look at William Smith papers.


            From: "aumsparky@..." <aumsparky@...>
            To: Ancient-Mysteries@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 10:25 AM
            Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

             
            newport tower
               for centuries men have wondered who built the newport tower, and for what purpose.  even say it was benedict arnold's windmill. 
               i think it was mentioned as pre-existing in the norse sagas, circa 1000 ce, as a grain shed, reported by thorwald.  it could have been first built long before. 
               pondering the location, it was chosen well for security, being an island, and commanded the river-estuary.  the number one priority would have been erecting a lookout tower, to prepare for attack by hostile tribes, or from the river or sea.  any other use may have been secondary.  this idea can be confirmed by viewing the horizon from the tower.  if the defending force was small, the stone tower could be resorted to as a keep or fortress.  it would be fairly safe from fire, or easily rebuilt when they returned. 
            mike
             



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            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            Version: 10.0.1392 / Virus Database: 1520/3859 - Release Date: 08/26/11

          • william smith
            Mike and Frank   I have spent many hours at The Newport Tower and taken many measurements. I have been able to identify every window, nitch and opening in the
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 26, 2011
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              Mike and Frank
                I have spent many hours at The Newport Tower and taken many measurements. I have been able to identify every window, nitch and opening in the tower as it was used to process cod fish for shipment. Yes it also had a lot to do with navigation, however it is unlikely it was used as a light house. The only window is a small 10 x 10 opening toward the south east and was used to place a lamp for returning fisherman from the cod fish stone traps that are still in the Atlantic. It did function as a lunar clock in order for the fisherman to determine when low tide was available for running their traps. The tower is located on the 41.25 latitude and the sun light was about 20 minutes longer during the day. The builders also knew of this and made the east west diameter of the tower 13 in. longer than the north south diameter. This compensates for the length of day when the sun light came through the south window and cast it's light on the second story north wall. At mid-day this light would be directly north and south of the east side of the north column and it would shine to the ground level to indicate the time of the year. On the longest day of the year the light would shine on the ground in the center of the tower, on the shortest day of the year it would shine 9 ft. north of the tower on the ground. This explaines why the columns are rotated 3 degrees counter clockwise to allow the light to pass on the side of the north column and tell time of the year. If you go to migration and Diffusion all this will be explained. Even the grooves in the walls on the second and third floor that held one end of the rods holding the fish feletts.The following link will give you a 3D viewing of the Newport Tower. Just put the link in your search and allow time for program to download, then you can use your mouse to rotate the tower or the zoom tools to focus on items of interest. When the program opens you are looking south, if you study the three main windows you will see that the west window has an opening above it for a lift aid. You will also see the stone construction above this window that allows the structure to handle the barrels of cod fish after they were processed. When the barrels were placed on the ground they would add water from the natural spring to the west about 3 blocks from the site. Soil testing completed by Michigan State of the unload area supports this function. The tower also had central heating confirmed by the fire pit to the north east. The tower was built by the Dutch and Portuguese in 1472 and financed by the King of Portugal and Denmark at that time. As an engineer I have researched this structure and will answer any questions any one who is interested in this pre-Columbus structure. At it's time of construction the walls were totally coated with mortar to allow even air flow inside and protection outside as well as sanitary reasons. This practice is still in place in France and Portugal.
              LINK  ( http://www.photospherix.com/flash_client.asp?id=np_0000_out      )
              William


              From: "aumsparky@..." <aumsparky@...>
              To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 2:01 PM
              Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

               
              
               
                 if that is true, what did thorwald see that he took for a stone grain shed over 400 years before?  this is the first report ive seen of a portuguese being ashore twenty years before columbus.  i dont know that its routine for the cod fishery to use a stone tower.  staying alive had to be number one priority. 
                 in either case, having a raised lookout tower would have been a necessity, if no hills were convenient.  many other cultures may have used a triangle.  it may be reaching to conclude it was cortreal. 
                 since you were there, does it have a commanding view from the tower?  could they see up the river or the mainland? 
                 i have no adopted theory, just seeking the most likely answer. 
               
              mike
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 10:53 AM
              Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

               
              Mike
                I have spent much time at the Newport Tower and investigated all the artifacts dug from the tower in 1947 by the Godfrey dig. I have read the more than 200 research opinions on the tower. In summary the tower was built as follows.
              The Newport Tower was built in 1472 by Joao Cortreal (Portuguese fisherman and leader of Knights of Christ), It was built to process cod fish for the European market. The builders mark is a  small triangle stone located 17 degrees west of true north on the outside top of the tower. The triangle was a symbol used by the Knights representing The Father, The Son and the Holy Ghost. The stone was located 17 degrees west of true north because that was the magnetic declination of the tower in 1472. At one time the tower had an atrium made of wood that was around the tower. This Atrium was 4 El's out from the tower columns (12 ft.) It provided living quarters for the crew and a work platform (roof) to tend the smoker for processing fish. If you are interested in an in depth engineering finding of facts go to the web site called (Migration and Diffusion) on this site go to authors and look at William Smith papers.


              From: "aumsparky@..." <aumsparky@...>
              To: Ancient-Mysteries@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 10:25 AM
              Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

               
              newport tower
                 for centuries men have wondered who built the newport tower, and for what purpose.  even say it was benedict arnold's windmill. 
                 i think it was mentioned as pre-existing in the norse sagas, circa 1000 ce, as a grain shed, reported by thorwald.  it could have been first built long before. 
                 pondering the location, it was chosen well for security, being an island, and commanded the river-estuary.  the number one priority would have been erecting a lookout tower, to prepare for attack by hostile tribes, or from the river or sea.  any other use may have been secondary.  this idea can be confirmed by viewing the horizon from the tower.  if the defending force was small, the stone tower could be resorted to as a keep or fortress.  it would be fairly safe from fire, or easily rebuilt when they returned. 
              mike
               



              No virus found in this message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 10.0.1392 / Virus Database: 1520/3859 - Release Date: 08/26/11


            • Frank
              I think you may not have understood what I was suggesting. In many cases natural landmarks might have been ambiguous. A sailor did not get many chances for
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 26, 2011
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                I think you may not have understood what I was suggesting. In many cases natural landmarks might have been ambiguous. A sailor did not get many chances for repeat voyages, and other sailors and navigators needed to be able to identify locations with little prior experience at the site. A unique tower may have aided navigation by eliminating uncertainty as to where the sailor was. A structure that served a main purpose, such as for drying fish. might have been built with unique attributes to help sailors identify which inlet they had entered. This might have been even more true in Europe, where entering the wrong inlet could have put you nose to nose with some enemy.

                I was not suggesting that the tower had no industrial function as a fish drying facility, and may have marked safe paths or timed tides for fishermen making repeat local trips. On the other hand, at the beginning of a season, if the tower had not been attended over the winter,it would have been reassuring to incoming fishermen to see an identifiable landmark.

                --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, william smith <wmsmithrock1@...> wrote:
                >
                > Mike and Frank
                >
                >   I have spent many hours at The Newport Tower and taken many measurements. I have been able to identify every window, nitch and opening in the tower as it was used to process cod fish for shipment. Yes it also had a lot to do with navigation, however it is unlikely it was used as a light house. The only window is a small 10 x 10 opening toward the south east and was used to place a lamp for returning fisherman from the cod fish stone traps that are still in the Atlantic. It did function as a lunar clock in order for the fisherman to determine when low tide was available for running their traps. The tower is located on the 41.25 latitude and the sun light was about 20 minutes longer during the day. The builders also knew of this and made the east west diameter of the tower 13 in. longer than the north south diameter. This compensates for the length of day when the sun light came through the south window and cast it's light on the second story north
                > wall. At mid-day this light would be directly north and south of the east side of the north column and it would shine to the ground level to indicate the time of the year. On the longest day of the year the light would shine on the ground in the center of the tower, on the shortest day of the year it would shine 9 ft. north of the tower on the ground. This explaines why the columns are rotated 3 degrees counter clockwise to allow the light to pass on the side of the north column and tell time of the year. If you go to migration and Diffusion all this will be explained. Even the grooves in the walls on the second and third floor that held one end of the rods holding the fish feletts.The following link will give you a 3D viewing of the Newport Tower. Just put the link in your search and allow time for program to download, then you can use your mouse to rotate the tower or the zoom tools to focus on items of interest. When the program opens you are looking
                > south, if you study the three main windows you will see that the west window has an opening above it for a lift aid. You will also see the stone construction above this window that allows the structure to handle the barrels of cod fish after they were processed. When the barrels were placed on the ground they would add water from the natural spring to the west about 3 blocks from the site. Soil testing completed by Michigan State of the unload area supports this function. The tower also had central heating confirmed by the fire pit to the north east. The tower was built by the Dutch and Portuguese in 1472 and financed by the King of Portugal and Denmark at that time. As an engineer I have researched this structure and will answer any questions any one who is interested in this pre-Columbus structure. At it's time of construction the walls were totally coated with mortar to allow even air flow inside and protection outside as well as sanitary reasons.
                > This practice is still in place in France and Portugal.
                > LINK  ( http://www.photospherix.com/flash_client.asp?id=np_0000_out      )
                > William
                >
              • Vincent Barrows
                What was found by the university of Michigan in the soil? Was there a fish bone?
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 26, 2011
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                  What was found by the university of Michigan in the soil?

                  Was there a fish bone?


                  From: william smith <wmsmithrock1@...>;
                  To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com <Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com>;
                  Cc: thor-thehuntersohiorock@yahoogroups.com <thor-thehuntersohiorock@yahoogroups.com>;
                  Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower
                  Sent: Fri, Aug 26, 2011 11:56:04 PM

                   

                  Mike and Frank
                    I have spent many hours at The Newport Tower and taken many measurements. I have been able to identify every window, nitch and opening in the tower as it was used to process cod fish for shipment. Yes it also had a lot to do with navigation, however it is unlikely it was used as a light house. The only window is a small 10 x 10 opening toward the south east and was used to place a lamp for returning fisherman from the cod fish stone traps that are still in the Atlantic. It did function as a lunar clock in order for the fisherman to determine when low tide was available for running their traps. The tower is located on the 41.25 latitude and the sun light was about 20 minutes longer during the day. The builders also knew of this and made the east west diameter of the tower 13 in. longer than the north south diameter. This compensates for the length of day when the sun light came through the south window and cast it's light on the second story north wall. At mid-day this light would be directly north and south of the east side of the north column and it would shine to the ground level to indicate the time of the year. On the longest day of the year the light would shine on the ground in the center of the tower, on the shortest day of the year it would shine 9 ft. north of the tower on the ground. This explaines why the columns are rotated 3 degrees counter clockwise to allow the light to pass on the side of the north column and tell time of the year. If you go to migration and Diffusion all this will be explained. Even the grooves in the walls on the second and third floor that held one end of the rods holding the fish feletts.The following link will give you a 3D viewing of the Newport Tower. Just put the link in your search and allow time for program to download, then you can use your mouse to rotate the tower or the zoom tools to focus on items of interest. When the program opens you are looking south, if you study the three main windows you will see that the west window has an opening above it for a lift aid. You will also see the stone construction above this window that allows the structure to handle the barrels of cod fish after they were processed. When the barrels were placed on the ground they would add water from the natural spring to the west about 3 blocks from the site. Soil testing completed by Michigan State of the unload area supports this function. The tower also had central heating confirmed by the fire pit to the north east. The tower was built by the Dutch and Portuguese in 1472 and financed by the King of Portugal and Denmark at that time. As an engineer I have researched this structure and will answer any questions any one who is interested in this pre-Columbus structure. At it's time of construction the walls were totally coated with mortar to allow even air flow inside and protection outside as well as sanitary reasons. This practice is still in place in France and Portugal.
                  LINK  ( http://www.photospherix.com/flash_client.asp?id=np_0000_out      )
                  William


                  From: "aumsparky@..." <aumsparky@...>
                  To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 2:01 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

                   
                  
                   
                     if that is true, what did thorwald see that he took for a stone grain shed over 400 years before?  this is the first report ive seen of a portuguese being ashore twenty years before columbus.  i dont know that its routine for the cod fishery to use a stone tower.  staying alive had to be number one priority. 
                     in either case, having a raised lookout tower would have been a necessity, if no hills were convenient.  many other cultures may have used a triangle.  it may be reaching to conclude it was cortreal. 
                     since you were there, does it have a commanding view from the tower?  could they see up the river or the mainland? 
                     i have no adopted theory, just seeking the most likely answer. 
                   
                  mike
                   
                   
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 10:53 AM
                  Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

                   
                  Mike
                    I have spent much time at the Newport Tower and investigated all the artifacts dug from the tower in 1947 by the Godfrey dig. I have read the more than 200 research opinions on the tower. In summary the tower was built as follows.
                  The Newport Tower was built in 1472 by Joao Cortreal (Portuguese fisherman and leader of Knights of Christ), It was built to process cod fish for the European market. The builders mark is a  small triangle stone located 17 degrees west of true north on the outside top of the tower. The triangle was a symbol used by the Knights representing The Father, The Son and the Holy Ghost. The stone was located 17 degrees west of true north because that was the magnetic declination of the tower in 1472. At one time the tower had an atrium made of wood that was around the tower. This Atrium was 4 El's out from the tower columns (12 ft.) It provided living quarters for the crew and a work platform (roof) to tend the smoker for processing fish. If you are interested in an in depth engineering finding of facts go to the web site called (Migration and Diffusion) on this site go to authors and look at William Smith papers.


                  From: "aumsparky@..." <aumsparky@...>
                  To: Ancient-Mysteries@yahoogroups.com
                  Cc: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 10:25 AM
                  Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

                   
                  newport tower
                     for centuries men have wondered who built the newport tower, and for what purpose.  even say it was benedict arnold's windmill. 
                     i think it was mentioned as pre-existing in the norse sagas, circa 1000 ce, as a grain shed, reported by thorwald.  it could have been first built long before. 
                     pondering the location, it was chosen well for security, being an island, and commanded the river-estuary.  the number one priority would have been erecting a lookout tower, to prepare for attack by hostile tribes, or from the river or sea.  any other use may have been secondary.  this idea can be confirmed by viewing the horizon from the tower.  if the defending force was small, the stone tower could be resorted to as a keep or fortress.  it would be fairly safe from fire, or easily rebuilt when they returned. 
                  mike
                   



                  No virus found in this message.
                  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  Version: 10.0.1392 / Virus Database: 1520/3859 - Release Date: 08/26/11


                • william smith
                  It was Michigan State soil test lab. Of the four samples checked the one from the unload station barrel filling area had zero salt where the other samples of
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 26, 2011
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                    It was Michigan State soil test lab. Of the four samples checked the one from the unload station barrel filling area had zero salt where the other samples of virgen soil in the area had equal amounts of salt. The reason for zero salt is because when the non solid cod liver oil was washed from the fish it would go to the top of the barrel and be first to run over the sides and into the ground. The oil would collect all the salt in the ground and when it rained it would bring the salt to the top to be washed away. Works the same as fish oil called salt be gone that you spray along the curb to remove salt from your yard.
                    William


                    From: Vincent Barrows <v_barrows@...>
                    To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 8:42 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

                     
                    What was found by the university of Michigan in the soil?

                    Was there a fish bone?


                    From: william smith <wmsmithrock1@...>;
                    To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com <Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com>;
                    Cc: thor-thehuntersohiorock@yahoogroups.com <thor-thehuntersohiorock@yahoogroups.com>;
                    Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower
                    Sent: Fri, Aug 26, 2011 11:56:04 PM

                     
                    Mike and Frank
                      I have spent many hours at The Newport Tower and taken many measurements. I have been able to identify every window, nitch and opening in the tower as it was used to process cod fish for shipment. Yes it also had a lot to do with navigation, however it is unlikely it was used as a light house. The only window is a small 10 x 10 opening toward the south east and was used to place a lamp for returning fisherman from the cod fish stone traps that are still in the Atlantic. It did function as a lunar clock in order for the fisherman to determine when low tide was available for running their traps. The tower is located on the 41.25 latitude and the sun light was about 20 minutes longer during the day. The builders also knew of this and made the east west diameter of the tower 13 in. longer than the north south diameter. This compensates for the length of day when the sun light came through the south window and cast it's light on the second story north wall. At mid-day this light would be directly north and south of the east side of the north column and it would shine to the ground level to indicate the time of the year. On the longest day of the year the light would shine on the ground in the center of the tower, on the shortest day of the year it would shine 9 ft. north of the tower on the ground. This explaines why the columns are rotated 3 degrees counter clockwise to allow the light to pass on the side of the north column and tell time of the year. If you go to migration and Diffusion all this will be explained. Even the grooves in the walls on the second and third floor that held one end of the rods holding the fish feletts.The following link will give you a 3D viewing of the Newport Tower. Just put the link in your search and allow time for program to download, then you can use your mouse to rotate the tower or the zoom tools to focus on items of interest. When the program opens you are looking south, if you study the three main windows you will see that the west window has an opening above it for a lift aid. You will also see the stone construction above this window that allows the structure to handle the barrels of cod fish after they were processed. When the barrels were placed on the ground they would add water from the natural spring to the west about 3 blocks from the site. Soil testing completed by Michigan State of the unload area supports this function. The tower also had central heating confirmed by the fire pit to the north east. The tower was built by the Dutch and Portuguese in 1472 and financed by the King of Portugal and Denmark at that time. As an engineer I have researched this structure and will answer any questions any one who is interested in this pre-Columbus structure. At it's time of construction the walls were totally coated with mortar to allow even air flow inside and protection outside as well as sanitary reasons. This practice is still in place in France and Portugal.
                    LINK  ( http://www.photospherix.com/flash_client.asp?id=np_0000_out      )
                    William


                    From: "aumsparky@..." <aumsparky@...>
                    To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 2:01 PM
                    Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

                     
                    
                     
                       if that is true, what did thorwald see that he took for a stone grain shed over 400 years before?  this is the first report ive seen of a portuguese being ashore twenty years before columbus.  i dont know that its routine for the cod fishery to use a stone tower.  staying alive had to be number one priority. 
                       in either case, having a raised lookout tower would have been a necessity, if no hills were convenient.  many other cultures may have used a triangle.  it may be reaching to conclude it was cortreal. 
                       since you were there, does it have a commanding view from the tower?  could they see up the river or the mainland? 
                       i have no adopted theory, just seeking the most likely answer. 
                     
                    mike
                     
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 10:53 AM
                    Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

                     
                    Mike
                      I have spent much time at the Newport Tower and investigated all the artifacts dug from the tower in 1947 by the Godfrey dig. I have read the more than 200 research opinions on the tower. In summary the tower was built as follows.
                    The Newport Tower was built in 1472 by Joao Cortreal (Portuguese fisherman and leader of Knights of Christ), It was built to process cod fish for the European market. The builders mark is a  small triangle stone located 17 degrees west of true north on the outside top of the tower. The triangle was a symbol used by the Knights representing The Father, The Son and the Holy Ghost. The stone was located 17 degrees west of true north because that was the magnetic declination of the tower in 1472. At one time the tower had an atrium made of wood that was around the tower. This Atrium was 4 El's out from the tower columns (12 ft.) It provided living quarters for the crew and a work platform (roof) to tend the smoker for processing fish. If you are interested in an in depth engineering finding of facts go to the web site called (Migration and Diffusion) on this site go to authors and look at William Smith papers.


                    From: "aumsparky@..." <aumsparky@...>
                    To: Ancient-Mysteries@yahoogroups.com
                    Cc: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 10:25 AM
                    Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] newport tower

                     
                    newport tower
                       for centuries men have wondered who built the newport tower, and for what purpose.  even say it was benedict arnold's windmill. 
                       i think it was mentioned as pre-existing in the norse sagas, circa 1000 ce, as a grain shed, reported by thorwald.  it could have been first built long before. 
                       pondering the location, it was chosen well for security, being an island, and commanded the river-estuary.  the number one priority would have been erecting a lookout tower, to prepare for attack by hostile tribes, or from the river or sea.  any other use may have been secondary.  this idea can be confirmed by viewing the horizon from the tower.  if the defending force was small, the stone tower could be resorted to as a keep or fortress.  it would be fairly safe from fire, or easily rebuilt when they returned. 
                    mike
                     



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                  • william smith
                    Frank   Your point was well understood. Yes the tower would have been a marking point for sailors. The safe harbor would have been west of the tower in
                    Message 9 of 9 , Aug 26, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Frank
                        Your point was well understood. Yes the tower would have been a marking point for sailors. The safe harbor would have been west of the tower in Narragessit bay. This is the likely place for docking due to shelter from the Atlantic. Both the Bay and the Atlantic are visable from the tower. A lighthouse showing the entrance to the Bay would have been about 5 miles to the south. Their is an old light house near this location that is built of native stone and it is on private land. Not sure of the age of this light house.


                      From: Frank <frankroskind@...>
                      To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Friday, August 26, 2011 8:06 PM
                      Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] Re: newport tower

                       
                      I think you may not have understood what I was suggesting. In many cases natural landmarks might have been ambiguous. A sailor did not get many chances for repeat voyages, and other sailors and navigators needed to be able to identify locations with little prior experience at the site. A unique tower may have aided navigation by eliminating uncertainty as to where the sailor was. A structure that served a main purpose, such as for drying fish. might have been built with unique attributes to help sailors identify which inlet they had entered. This might have been even more true in Europe, where entering the wrong inlet could have put you nose to nose with some enemy.

                      I was not suggesting that the tower had no industrial function as a fish drying facility, and may have marked safe paths or timed tides for fishermen making repeat local trips. On the other hand, at the beginning of a season, if the tower had not been attended over the winter,it would have been reassuring to incoming fishermen to see an identifiable landmark.

                      --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, william smith <wmsmithrock1@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Mike and Frank
                      >
                      >   I have spent many hours at The Newport Tower and taken many measurements. I have been able to identify every window, nitch and opening in the tower as it was used to process cod fish for shipment. Yes it also had a lot to do with navigation, however it is unlikely it was used as a light house. The only window is a small 10 x 10 opening toward the south east and was used to place a lamp for returning fisherman from the cod fish stone traps that are still in the Atlantic. It did function as a lunar clock in order for the fisherman to determine when low tide was available for running their traps. The tower is located on the 41.25 latitude and the sun light was about 20 minutes longer during the day. The builders also knew of this and made the east west diameter of the tower 13 in. longer than the north south diameter. This compensates for the length of day when the sun light came through the south window and cast it's light on the second story north
                      > wall. At mid-day this light would be directly north and south of the east side of the north column and it would shine to the ground level to indicate the time of the year. On the longest day of the year the light would shine on the ground in the center of the tower, on the shortest day of the year it would shine 9 ft. north of the tower on the ground. This explaines why the columns are rotated 3 degrees counter clockwise to allow the light to pass on the side of the north column and tell time of the year. If you go to migration and Diffusion all this will be explained. Even the grooves in the walls on the second and third floor that held one end of the rods holding the fish feletts.The following link will give you a 3D viewing of the Newport Tower. Just put the link in your search and allow time for program to download, then you can use your mouse to rotate the tower or the zoom tools to focus on items of interest. When the program opens you are looking
                      > south, if you study the three main windows you will see that the west window has an opening above it for a lift aid. You will also see the stone construction above this window that allows the structure to handle the barrels of cod fish after they were processed. When the barrels were placed on the ground they would add water from the natural spring to the west about 3 blocks from the site. Soil testing completed by Michigan State of the unload area supports this function. The tower also had central heating confirmed by the fire pit to the north east. The tower was built by the Dutch and Portuguese in 1472 and financed by the King of Portugal and Denmark at that time. As an engineer I have researched this structure and will answer any questions any one who is interested in this pre-Columbus structure. At it's time of construction the walls were totally coated with mortar to allow even air flow inside and protection outside as well as sanitary reasons.
                      > This practice is still in place in France and Portugal.
                      > LINK  ( http://www.photospherix.com/flash_client.asp?id=np_0000_out      )
                      > William
                      >



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