Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] heavener runestone

Expand Messages
  • José Vergara
    Any book or publication (web) from Barry Fell about this? Un saludo José Vergara ... Any book or publication (web) from Barry Fell about this? Un saludo José
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 11, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      Any book or publication (web) from Barry Fell about this?

      Un saludo

      José Vergara


      El 11/04/2010, a las 19:12, mike white escribió:

       

       
          you might read what dr barry fell said about iberian scripts.  the magyar had reached all across europe in prehistoric times, beginning near 10,000 bce.  almost all of the land features of europe, lakes, rivers, and mountains, bear magyar names to this day. 
       
      mike
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2010 6:32 AM
      Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_ Inscriptions] heavener runestone

       

      Mike, what do you hink about iberic or iberan symbols?. Loos like runic, but are from the same period than magyar ones?


      Un saludo

      José Vergara


      El 10/04/2010, a las 02:13, mike white escribió:

       

       
         my studies tell me that the earliest runic writing was right to left.  this was true for the original magyar runes, and the oldest elder futhark.  in later times the vikings used left to right. 
         the heavener runestone does have characters mainly from the gothic [magyar], with some from the elder futhark
         copying right to left, ive transliterated to our l to r format.  some characters are uncertain. 
      JAUVMODB
       
         little is known by the experts.  they know nothing of the magyar before 800 ce.  they call the early gothic runes 'germanic', unaware that germanic has roots in the frisian language, which never used runes.  some magyar reached east of the black forest, where early runes were found. 
         based on the archaic runes used and the patina, im inclined to think the inscription is authentic, and probably long before the viking period, and more likely by magyar people.  based on other finds, the area around heavener and wilburton ok may have been settled for some time by these ancient people, and should be excavated for ruins and relics.  the high ground should be explored before that under 800 ft.  the french and vikings merely passed thru the region. 
       
      imho
      mike
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, April 09, 2010 1:50 PM
      Subject: [Precolumbian_ Inscriptions] heavener runestone

       

      

       
         i came upon this site while looking for something else, and it grabbed my attention.  using google earth i surveyed the area.  my ideas differ from those of the author.
       
       
         dr woodward tries to build a case for la salle's party having erected the monument during their trek north in 1687.  leaving unanswered, why they would use gothic runes instead of french, and why they would choose a location high up on a bluff to proclaim ownership of a valley that they were merely passing thru enroute to joining other french to the north.  it doesnt sound very plausible to me.  i have not read his entire article, so could change my mind later.  la salle's group were an official expedition from the govt of france.  any ownership claims would have been royal.  chances are, they never saw the monument. 
         the etchings have patina, and seem much older than 1687.  they could have been drawn by the 'vikings' of circa 1050 ce.  cayce reported that they did explore the rivers south and west from minn.  the presence of gothic runes in 1050 appear to be an anomaly.  by that date, the vikings had already modified the original magyar runes. 
         looking the region over by google earth, its apparent that not so long the sea had made islands of the high ground.  poteau mt had been an island, and the bluff where the monument stood, may have been on the shoreline.  the claim of 55 mya for that inland sea is probably a major fallacy, that keeps people from coming to the proper conclusions.  the finds of stone axes only on the high ground indicates that men had settled them when they were islands, and it wasnt 55 mya.  one can still trace by elevation the former shoreline, at about 800 ft.  iron and gold relics found in coal at wilburton, just west of heavener, prove that an advanced culture had settled there in ancient times, and some of them had been destroyed by flooding of the sea.  these people may have been magyar, who had been looking for new lands after the poleshift circa 10,000 bce.  that seems more likely than the french of 1687 going to so much trouble in writing 'jimmy's valley' in gothic runes!  the monument should be translated by a magyar scholar, or hungarian. 
       
      imho
      mike
       
       






    • mike white
      i havent found dr fell s books online as etext, other than commentary and citations. America B. C. - Ancient Settlers in the New World by Barry Fell Saga
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 11, 2010
      • 0 Attachment
         
           i havent found dr fell's books online as etext, other than commentary and citations. 
         
         
         
         
        mike
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2010 2:55 PM
        Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] heavener runestone

         

        Any book or publication (web) from Barry Fell about this?


        Un saludo

        José Vergara


        El 11/04/2010, a las 19:12, mike white escribió:

         

         
            you might read what dr barry fell said about iberian scripts.  the magyar had reached all across europe in prehistoric times, beginning near 10,000 bce.  almost all of the land features of europe, lakes, rivers, and mountains, bear magyar names to this day. 
         
        mike
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, April 11, 2010 6:32 AM
        Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_ Inscriptions] heavener runestone

         

        Mike, what do you hink about iberic or iberan symbols?. Loos like runic, but are from the same period than magyar ones?


        Un saludo

        José Vergara


        El 10/04/2010, a las 02:13, mike white escribió:

         

         
           my studies tell me that the earliest runic writing was right to left.  this was true for the original magyar runes, and the oldest elder futhark.  in later times the vikings used left to right. 
           the heavener runestone does have characters mainly from the gothic [magyar], with some from the elder futhark
           copying right to left, ive transliterated to our l to r format.  some characters are uncertain. 
        JAUVMODB
         
           little is known by the experts.  they know nothing of the magyar before 800 ce.  they call the early gothic runes 'germanic', unaware that germanic has roots in the frisian language, which never used runes.  some magyar reached east of the black forest, where early runes were found. 
           based on the archaic runes used and the patina, im inclined to think the inscription is authentic, and probably long before the viking period, and more likely by magyar people.  based on other finds, the area around heavener and wilburton ok may have been settled for some time by these ancient people, and should be excavated for ruins and relics.  the high ground should be explored before that under 800 ft.  the french and vikings merely passed thru the region. 
         
        imho
        mike
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, April 09, 2010 1:50 PM
        Subject: [Precolumbian_ Inscriptions] heavener runestone

         

        

         
           i came upon this site while looking for something else, and it grabbed my attention.  using google earth i surveyed the area.  my ideas differ from those of the author.
         
         
           dr woodward tries to build a case for la salle's party having erected the monument during their trek north in 1687.  leaving unanswered, why they would use gothic runes instead of french, and why they would choose a location high up on a bluff to proclaim ownership of a valley that they were merely passing thru enroute to joining other french to the north.  it doesnt sound very plausible to me.  i have not read his entire article, so could change my mind later.  la salle's group were an official expedition from the govt of france.  any ownership claims would have been royal.  chances are, they never saw the monument. 
           the etchings have patina, and seem much older than 1687.  they could have been drawn by the 'vikings' of circa 1050 ce.  cayce reported that they did explore the rivers south and west from minn.  the presence of gothic runes in 1050 appear to be an anomaly.  by that date, the vikings had already modified the original magyar runes. 
           looking the region over by google earth, its apparent that not so long the sea had made islands of the high ground.  poteau mt had been an island, and the bluff where the monument stood, may have been on the shoreline.  the claim of 55 mya for that inland sea is probably a major fallacy, that keeps people from coming to the proper conclusions.  the finds of stone axes only on the high ground indicates that men had settled them when they were islands, and it wasnt 55 mya.  one can still trace by elevation the former shoreline, at about 800 ft.  iron and gold relics found in coal at wilburton, just west of heavener, prove that an advanced culture had settled there in ancient times, and some of them had been destroyed by flooding of the sea.  these people may have been magyar, who had been looking for new lands after the poleshift circa 10,000 bce.  that seems more likely than the french of 1687 going to so much trouble in writing 'jimmy's valley' in gothic runes!  the monument should be translated by a magyar scholar, or hungarian. 
         
        imho
        mike
         
         






      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.