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nc mounds

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  • mike white
    i have learned of two mounds in the smokies. one at franklin, nc, called the nikwasi mound held a council house in the 18th c by the cherokee. thought to
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 7, 2009
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         i have learned of two mounds in the smokies.  one at franklin, nc, called the nikwasi mound held a council house in the 18th c by the cherokee.  thought to have been originally built by the southeastern hopewell, and later used by the cherokee.  later mr siler built a gazebo upon it.  it has been preserved, and never excavated.  recently, it was scanned by a gpr to a depth of 8 ft.  the shallow profile found what may have been the gazebo foundation. 
         another mound called the garden creek complex is in haywood county.  both were built in stages, possibly over a semi-subterranean structure.  the local mound appears to be about 12 ft high, and grass covered, irregular shaped.  hard to believe that nobody has dug it for relics, since the town has been settled a long time. 
         it would have been a fine project for one of the nc universities to excavate it.  at least core samples or a trench may have added to our knowledge of the early natives.  little can be determined from the weak gpr that was used.  they need to sense down to 20 ft depth. 
         the hopewell moundbuilders are known to have extended this far to the southeast.  their mica was sourced here.  a little further south was the area of another strange and unique tribe of moundbuilders.  i forget the name, but have spoke of them before.  the etowah, thats it, look up the strange pottery figures excavated at cartersville ga. 
       
       
         i disagree with academic notions that tell of two major groups of moundbuilders, the adena and hopewell.  i think there were many more groups that extended back to 40,000 bce or before.  it confuses and muddles everything to try to classify them into the 2-4 groups commonly alloted. 
         the giants of ny and pa built mounds, and the lemurians are said to have raised mounds across the south before them. 
         i think the effigy mounds of the midwest are by a unique unidentified group of moundbuilders.  active moundbuilders were said by cayce to have been joined by people who came south from canada, after a poleshift turned their land cold and frozen. 
       
      mike
       
       
    • Phil Whitley
      Mike said, i forget the name, but have spoke of them before. the etowah, thats it, look up the strange pottery figures excavated at cartersville ga. The
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 7, 2009
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        Mike said, "i forget the name, but have spoke of them before.  the etowah, thats it, look up the strange pottery figures excavated at cartersville ga. "

        The word "etowah" comes from the Muskogee/Creek language - from their word "italwa", which means "Town". The mounds were built by the Mississippian culture (900-1550 AD) and were most likely the early ancestors of the Creek/Muskogee people. I did note that the stone effigies bear a strong resemblance to Mayan artwork.

        We recently visited the site and took many photos - a few of which I have posted on my Multiply album at ETOWAH MOUNDS

        Clich on each image to enlarge, then use the "Zoom" feature to gat an even larger image. Hope you enjoy them!

        Brew



      • mike white
        another article showed a marked similarity with the art of western mexico. they dug a pair of figurines there with the same facial expressions, where the
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 7, 2009
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              another article showed a marked similarity with the art of western mexico.  they dug a pair of figurines there with the same facial expressions, where the female rested on her knees, and the man with legs folded, just as at etowah. 
             my opinion is they are thousands of years earlier than the date given.  its known that the maya first landed in western mexico, then later moved to yucatan.  mayan writing in yucatan has been pushed back to 1200 bce.  im led to think the etowah and early naygarit [unsure of sp], date to 3000 bce or earlier, to their pre-writing period. 
             we must consider that the truncated temple pyramids across the south, were began by the lemurians.  cayce said they were the first to build pyramids, and they spread across the south about 40,000 years ago.  mexico had been a portion of lemuria.  if we correlate to mainstream views, we may think the earliest mississippian culture dates to that era.  it was far degraded by the conquest.  they had lost the use of copper, outside of mexico, and had reverted to the use of flints.  i dont think any significant mounds were raised after 3000 bce, other than crude burial heaps. 
             if you read the experts, you find nothing more convincing to support their dating.  its a house of cards, with one citing another, and no substance.   
           
          mike
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 4:52 PM
          Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] nc mounds

          Mike said, "i forget the name, but have spoke of them before.  the etowah, thats it, look up the strange pottery figures excavated at cartersville ga. "

          The word "etowah" comes from the Muskogee/Creek language - from their word "italwa", which means "Town". The mounds were built by the Mississippian culture (900-1550 AD) and were most likely the early ancestors of the Creek/Muskogee people. I did note that the stone effigies bear a strong resemblance to Mayan artwork.

          We recently visited the site and took many photos - a few of which I have posted on my Multiply album at ETOWAH MOUNDS

          Clich on each image to enlarge, then use the "Zoom" feature to gat an even larger image. Hope you enjoy them!

          Brew



        • Phil Whitley
          Were you able to see the images on my Multiply site, Mike? It is the Etowah River which forms Lake Allatoona. The fish weir is original and is on the Etowah,
          Message 4 of 6 , Jun 7, 2009
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            Were you able to see the images on my Multiply site, Mike? It is the Etowah River which forms Lake Allatoona. The fish weir is original and is on the Etowah, no more than a hundred yards from the mounds. I would love to team up with you, but I also have problems with my legs and knees. I'm pretty handy with a canoe though!

            From the mounds you can see a large coal-fired power plant - maybe that's what you saw on Google Earth?

            Have you heard of the pentagonal mounds in the southeast? I have a Creek Indian friend who says they still exist, but aren't discussed very much. Wonder why?

            Brew

            ================

            mike white wrote:

             
                another article showed a marked similarity with the art of western mexico.  they dug a pair of figurines there with the same facial expressions, where the female rested on her knees, and the man with legs folded, just as at etowah. 
               my opinion is they are thousands of years earlier than the date given.  its known that the maya first landed in western mexico, then later moved to yucatan.  mayan writing in yucatan has been pushed back to 1200 bce.  im led to think the etowah and early naygarit [unsure of sp], date to 3000 bce or earlier, to their pre-writing period. 
               we must consider that the truncated temple pyramids across the south, were began by the lemurians.  cayce said they were the first to build pyramids, and they spread across the south about 40,000 years ago.  mexico had been a portion of lemuria.  if we correlate to mainstream views, we may think the earliest mississippian culture dates to that era.  it was far degraded by the conquest.  they had lost the use of copper, outside of mexico, and had reverted to the use of flints.  i dont think any significant mounds were raised after 3000 bce, other than crude burial heaps. 
               if you read the experts, you find nothing more convincing to support their dating.  its a house of cards, with one citing another, and no substance.   
             
            mike
             


          • mike white
            sounds like a plan brew, this area is fascinating, with great finds awaiting! at the bottom of the reservoir that seems to cover the city, can be seen, what
            Message 5 of 6 , Jun 7, 2009
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                 sounds like a plan brew, this area is fascinating, with great finds awaiting!  at the bottom of the reservoir that seems to cover the city, can be seen, what appears to be an old earthen dam, that has burst, or was flooded on purpose.  if not historical, we have a wonderful discovering here! 
                 yes i saw the 6 images, but overlooked the river name. 
                 there must have been a large population here in ancient times.  my guess is a farming community.  in a short study, i have found enough for a field trip to explore.  incredible that in over 200 years of american occupation, so little was noticed. 
                 if the 3 ovals were a power plant, its strange that no roads or rails connect them.  i saw 2 small trails, faintly. 
                 i never heard of the pentagon mounds.  would like more info. 
                 there is the cartersville quality inn on rt 41, the joe frank harris parkway, that is less than a mile [.7m] hike to the earthen dam and reservoir that covers the 'city'.  that looks like an easy way to explore these features.  the f and u are only 1.25 miles from the hotel. 
                 im retired, and expect to be in conyers later this week.  can you be ready on short notice brew?  soon as i know the dates im there, i will email you.  its about 53 miles as the crow flies from my new home to the motel at cartersville.  about 100 miles from my nc home.  it can be next saturday, if you wish? 
                
              mike
               
               
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 7:11 PM
              Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] nc mounds

              Were you able to see the images on my Multiply site, Mike? It is the Etowah River which forms Lake Allatoona. The fish weir is original and is on the Etowah, no more than a hundred yards from the mounds. I would love to team up with you, but I also have problems with my legs and knees. I'm pretty handy with a canoe though!

              From the mounds you can see a large coal-fired power plant - maybe that's what you saw on Google Earth?

              Have you heard of the pentagonal mounds in the southeast? I have a Creek Indian friend who says they still exist, but aren't discussed very much. Wonder why?

              Brew

              ============ ====

              mike white wrote:

               
                  another article showed a marked similarity with the art of western mexico.  they dug a pair of figurines there with the same facial expressions, where the female rested on her knees, and the man with legs folded, just as at etowah. 
                 my opinion is they are thousands of years earlier than the date given.  its known that the maya first landed in western mexico, then later moved to yucatan.  mayan writing in yucatan has been pushed back to 1200 bce.  im led to think the etowah and early naygarit [unsure of sp], date to 3000 bce or earlier, to their pre-writing period. 
                 we must consider that the truncated temple pyramids across the south, were began by the lemurians.  cayce said they were the first to build pyramids, and they spread across the south about 40,000 years ago.  mexico had been a portion of lemuria.  if we correlate to mainstream views, we may think the earliest mississippian culture dates to that era.  it was far degraded by the conquest.  they had lost the use of copper, outside of mexico, and had reverted to the use of flints.  i dont think any significant mounds were raised after 3000 bce, other than crude burial heaps. 
                 if you read the experts, you find nothing more convincing to support their dating.  its a house of cards, with one citing another, and no substance.   
               
              mike
               


            • justice family
              I have lived in Alabama and once did a study of mounds in that state. I was struck by certain large hills that looked more like mounds that had finally
              Message 6 of 6 , Jun 7, 2009
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                I have lived in Alabama and once did a study of mounds in that state. I was struck by certain large "hills" that looked more like mounds that had finally become overgrown. There are 20 some large mounds in the state of Alabama and I know for certain that the waterways of those states were used at the time of the aboriginal peoples of the area, and that predated the Creeks by a long time. In the files of our group there is posted the USGS report of the findings in Crumph cave . The report was written in the 1800s.......very interesting.....and it is along a river...I want to say the Black Fork of the Warrior River, but I may be wrong. The waterways in the southern states are certainly a way to find some most interesting epigraphy and ancient remains.
                   Jamye
                 
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 6:11 PM
                Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] nc mounds

                Were you able to see the images on my Multiply site, Mike? It is the Etowah River which forms Lake Allatoona. The fish weir is original and is on the Etowah, no more than a hundred yards from the mounds. I would love to team up with you, but I also have problems with my legs and knees. I'm pretty handy with a canoe though!

                From the mounds you can see a large coal-fired power plant - maybe that's what you saw on Google Earth?

                Have you heard of the pentagonal mounds in the southeast? I have a Creek Indian friend who says they still exist, but aren't discussed very much. Wonder why?

                Brew

                ============ ====

                mike white wrote:

                 
                    another article showed a marked similarity with the art of western mexico.  they dug a pair of figurines there with the same facial expressions, where the female rested on her knees, and the man with legs folded, just as at etowah. 
                   my opinion is they are thousands of years earlier than the date given.  its known that the maya first landed in western mexico, then later moved to yucatan.  mayan writing in yucatan has been pushed back to 1200 bce.  im led to think the etowah and early naygarit [unsure of sp], date to 3000 bce or earlier, to their pre-writing period. 
                   we must consider that the truncated temple pyramids across the south, were began by the lemurians.  cayce said they were the first to build pyramids, and they spread across the south about 40,000 years ago.  mexico had been a portion of lemuria.  if we correlate to mainstream views, we may think the earliest mississippian culture dates to that era.  it was far degraded by the conquest.  they had lost the use of copper, outside of mexico, and had reverted to the use of flints.  i dont think any significant mounds were raised after 3000 bce, other than crude burial heaps. 
                   if you read the experts, you find nothing more convincing to support their dating.  its a house of cards, with one citing another, and no substance.   
                 
                mike
                 




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