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Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] 1836 book on chile

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  • jdaintira@aol.com
    In a message dated 9/7/2008 4:06:40 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time, infoplz@verizon.net writes: recently, i was pondering how much easier it was to get to the
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 7, 2008
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      In a message dated 9/7/2008 4:06:40 P.M. US Mountain Standard Time, infoplz@... writes:
      recently, i was pondering how much easier it was to get to the andes from the east by going up the rio platta, thru tucuman, and up the south flank to the silver mines.  many must have discovered and used this route.  the continent is much narrower here, and the passes are lower. 
      Hi Mike,
       
      It is my understanding that the terrain is quite rugged.
       
      I would recommend renting the DVD of The Motor Cycle Diaries.
       
      It is my understanding that it was largely shot on location, depicting the wealthy, young Dr. Guevara's motorcycle trip with his cousin across Argentina to Chili and then up the Pacific Coast on their way to work at a leper colony in the Amazon basin.
       
      The land, people, and customs are fascinating.
       
      And, while I do not approve of violence as a solution, I could also see how what he discovered on this trip gradually changed him into Che and why he is still a hero to so many in Mexico and South America.
       
      ~Judith Marie



    • mike white
      most historians tell us that sailors before the civil war were ignorant brutes, yet the authors were intelligent and well-read. melville was another who didnt
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 10, 2008
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           most historians tell us that sailors before the civil war were ignorant brutes, yet the authors were intelligent and well-read.  melville was another who didnt fit the mold. 
           p35 so far little was told of the araucanians.  he tells us that spaniards, some noble and hospitable, while many others were cold cut-throats.
           i was surprised at the forests and well-watered terrain of chile.  apparently the passes are low enough to permit rain clouds to reach the west coast from the east.  im curious how much the northern passes would need to be cut in order to allow rain in the west.  its a wonder the inca didnt order it done. 
           many sailors jumped ship from the whaling fleet, miserly captains and ship owners treated the crews terribly. 
           i dont plan on visiting chile, so this book may be my source for info on that nation.  it is too prone for quakes, and its just a matter of time before another uplift closes its access to rain clouds, and it becomes a desert.  i think chile was wrong to take bolivia's seaport away, and its nitrate resources.  the aymara were the first people of south america, and should be treated better. 
           p46  they met with a party of araucanian indians, a proud and warlike people, who had never been subdued by the spaniards, and who still controlled a large territory.  saving the life of one, he was able to visit their land.  they killed spaniards on sight.  guvedio was elected chief.  the tribe remained the same as before the conquest.  at their seaport aranco, they seized three american and one english ships in 1820.   reynolds alone had written an account of this tribe before this book.  metina was sister of the chief.  they had a village along a lake, living in cabins, tending vegetables and flowers.  they lived better than life in most of the chileno towns. 
         
        mike
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, September 07, 2008 7:05 PM
        Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] 1836 book on chile

        

         
        Rambles in Chili : and life among the Araucanian Indians, in 1836
         
         
           you might recall, it was these indians who had frisians among them. 
         
           judith, thanks for the article.  im surprised they got permits and recognition, since it doesnt sound like a well-funded, institution- backed expedition.  they are inviting people like us to join them in 2010.  maybe i will use space imagery to look over colca canyon. 
           i got my id card for south american explorers.  they have club houses in lima, cuzco, quito, and in argentina, and good resources for andean travellers. 
           recently, i was pondering how much easier it was to get to the andes from the east by going up the rio platta, thru tucuman, and up the south flank to the silver mines.  many must have discovered and used this route.  the continent is much narrower here, and the passes are lower.  lots of germans came this way after ww2. 
         
        mike
         
         

      • mike white
        name of the village was wonseta, meaning sweet drink. their cemetery was on an island in the lake. dead buried in boxes raised off the ground. liberty and
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 12, 2008
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             name of the village was wonseta, meaning sweet drink.  their cemetery was on an island in the lake.  dead buried in boxes raised off the ground.  liberty and equality were top values to them.  the 'toqui' was the head chief of the nation. 
             he called the guanaco a species of goat, saying their wool was the most valuable.  they hunted with guns, that they must have obtained from dutch traders on the coast.  they killed a jaguar of 400-500 lbs. 
             the book ends with these deserters taking berths on an american or english warship on its way to help in their war against peru. 
           
             ive received the 'secrets of the lost races', like new hc.  i will read it next, and may post parts. 
           
          mike
           
            
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