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12161lake bonneville

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  • mike white
    Jun 8, 2014
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         lake bonneville :  i reviewed what the experts say, and what the mystics have given, and have studied the terrain with google earth.  it looks as if the lake or inland sea had covered up to 150,000 square miles.  unless compelling evidence opposed to this scenario is found, i think this may be closer to the truth.  it contained an incredible volume of water, thousands of feet deep in portions. 
         the great deluge of noah, sent waves miles high over all of the continents, in circa 24,000 bce, the last start of the age of aquarius.  when the water receded, much was trapped in basins, all over the world.  lake bonneville was one of these basins.  it began as salt water, but fresh water was added by rivers and rains, that by density stayed atop the salt water. 
         going by the words of phylos, that cayce said could be trusted, lake bonneville persisted to at least 11,500 bce.  apparently, fresh water was added greater than that lost thru evaporation.  for a few millennia the lake expanded in size, before shrinking.  it was still a huge lake at the end. 
         the dating of lava eruptions and flows does not appear to be an exact science.  there was likely a lava flow that reached lake bonneville.  the lake drained very rapidly.  judging from the channel elevations that carried the water away, it was blasted out of its bed explosively, probably by the force of steam. 
         a great volume of water flowed to the southeast, carving out marble canyon, and buck farm canyon, before adding massive flood erosion to the grand canyon.  this sudden event carved more out of the grand canyon than all of the years that the colorado river flowed thru it. 
         the flood waters could have been hundreds of feet high flowing across az and nv, on their way to the sea at southern california and the sea of cortez. 
         this great flood added to earlier flood erosion from the poleshift tsunamis of 24,000 bce that filled the basins, and any other tsunamis that may have been generated by seabed upheaval or cosmic impact.   az, nv, and ut have greater flood erosion than anywhere on earth.  only a geologist could think it happened mya. 
         any megafauna that survived the earlier kill-off event, would have been swept to the sea by this last flood.  its quite possible that the great deluge of 24,000 bce killed-off the megafauna, sweeping their carcases to alaska and siberia.  this poleshift event, and the bonneville flood could explain the massive flood erosion, and the megafauna kill-off. 
       
      mike