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11938Re: mosquito -- yahoo tech note

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  • james m clark jr
    Jun 14, 2012
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      Actually this link is still listed and readable using a unsecure google search or even a secure dogpile search. Related to Yahoo 1.0 and the new 2.0 sites such as this one could cause unsupported data on the recieving end of pc's or lab tops with older specs. Usually when large sites are under construction as Yahoo is now relay time is unpredictable and can even become lost or take half a day to 2 weeks or longer for even Yahoo! to reconize it.

      Yahoo still has hope in it's transitional shell as the recovery of the contour spacecraft. Hopefully fan base numbers will coninuely improve upgrages at yahoo!

      be well,
      jay


      --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "james m clark jr" <mirageinspectorjay@...> wrote:
      >
      > Evidently the link provided had been reported recently to a University in in the state of Pennsylvania in just the past
      > few days or website owner has teporarily removed the article.
      > Perhaps a prank? Perhaps it was Rob Gargett idea to portray a Haida Native American? At any rate perhaps the author will obtain permission to use images soon to reinstate his opinion on the last glacierization periods hot spots.
      >
      > To a degee this is understandable although the religious aspect of the attack of diffusist is hardly nonreligious madness which is dubbed Scientific Gratitude in the past decade of this positive psychology movement which has shiffed to extremes in various articles such as Dr. Leper's and other non religious and scienticly sound movement of anything but.
      >
      > be well,
      > jay
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "james m clark jr" <mirageinspectorjay@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Come across this a few days ago in Society for American Archaeology at linked In.
      > > http://thesubversivearchaeologist.blogspot.com/2012/05/tlingit-and-haida-genetic\s-and-peopling.html
      > >
      > > It's interesting you mentioned Peru Mike. Actually I thought I had addressed an obsevation to Lizzie last year... I wasn't aware I was bouncing here. Perhaps not relavent now although I hadn't recalled anything simular in biology.
      > >
      > > Not sure if there is an image of Owl Rock in North Georgia online or either. Although it appears more like a serpent emerging from a body of water... perhaps a transitional stage of mosquito infested waters? It hardly appears as owl or flying creature. An 8 foot mosquito. lol
      > > Perhaps created at a time if ice melt?
      > >
      > > Last year when that serpent like storm swept across the mid west and the tail end of it made it to my area in middle Georgia where the Ocmulgee Old Fields are located we recived very little rain the wind perioical would reach ground level but mostly remained at a higher elavation. The storm was much worse to the south & north. When the wind started picking up I raised the windows and even opened the attic and out came a mosquito hawk.
      > >
      > > My house had just burnt down in July of 2010 and I didn't recive insurance funds until March... lost 101 quartz, marble & clay marbles by the way which were generally the size of a 61 cal musket or blow gun shot... I only have 8 now. 7 are clay 1 marble no quartz recovered.
      > >
      > > At any rate, before the storm hit here on April 6th I had bought a cheep guitar. It was geting late in the evening and with very little to do library gone... I had come up with a second course I wanted to work on. It wasn't that dark and the bedroom widows provided exelent light in case the lights did go out before sunset. While I was strumging I noticed this mosquito hawk flying about in the air current in a general location at top of my doorway close to the attic ever since I had opened it. Then a bolt of lighting struck very close and I see this mosquito hawk losing control and he crash landed on my bed right next to me. This sucker was paralized for about 4 minites.
      > > As hard as it tried it could not move. A tune no longer was that interesting. I wanted to know the distance that this eletric field would have to cause this imoblizing state. I never did find out. I wasn't sure if it was dead or just nerves. As as soon as I touched it it flew away as if not being stuck in a prayer like position with it's forelegs completely extended.
      > >
      > > I had though the bolt struck the huge pine tree out front but it didn't. I also though the wind had twisted a y shape branch but it didn't. After the limb died and damage visible sometime later I realized that this was where the bolt of lighting hit which was about 30 ft from the ground 45 ft from my window.
      > >
      > > jamey
      > >
      > > --- In Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com, "mike white" <aumsparky@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > I had to look twice, I thought lizzie borden returned, lol. you bring up a good point, ancient mentions would not have said ‘mosquito’.
      > > > your footnote was also poignant. our lads develop an hypothesis, then they get grant funding to go out and prove it. not conducive to good science, but unlikely to change anytime soon. it would be refreshing for them to find proof contrary to their hypothesis, and present that.
      > > > im not surprised if mosquitoes reached egypt in ancient times, since contact with the americas seems fairly certain. the article used the term ‘parsite’, which made me think a flea was involved. it would be incredible if mosquitoes began in peru, where the quinine bark is also found to cure malaria.
      > > >
      > > > mike
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > From: Lizzie Broden
      > > > Sent: Saturday, December 25, 2010 5:36 PM
      > > > To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Subject: Re: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] mosquito
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Basic common scene would suggest Asia as a source, as it has a very hot and wet climate.
      > > >
      > > > I am not sure about them being in classic lit, but the word "Mosquito" means little fly in Spanish and Portuguese and comes from the Latin root word "Musca" for fly.
      > > >
      > > > My guess would be South East Asia
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > "Nature is showing us only the tail of the lion, but I have no doubt that the lion belongs to it even though, because of its large size, it cannot totally reveal itself all at once."
      > > > -â€" Albert Einstein
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > "It is far better to grasp the universe as it really is than to persist in delusions, however satisfying and reassuring."
      > > > --Carl Sagan
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > "There is no such thing as an insignificant detail. Don't just look
      > > > for what you want to find."
      > > > -- Me LOL
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      > > > From: michael <aumsparky@>
      > > > To: Precolumbian_Inscriptions@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Sat, December 25, 2010 3:08:15 AM
      > > > Subject: [Precolumbian_Inscriptions] mosquito
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > at this season most never think of a mosquito, but there is a mystery that came to mind. while reading of early exploration, it was mentioned that many islands of the pacific never had mosquitoes before the western explorers arrived. the natives were unprepared to deal with these pests.
      > > > it has me wondering how widespread mosquitoes are today. using google i found no studies that discussed the spread of them, only the spread of disease carried by them. apparently they originated someplace, and were carried by ships from there to other regions. i dont recall any of the european classics from greek and roman times mentioning the mosquito. perhaps these noxious insects began in the americas.
      > > > sometimes the spread of things give us a clue to ancient voyages, like the diffusion of bamboo and peanuts.
      > > >
      > > > happy holidays
      > > > mike
      > > >
      > >
      >
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