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  • Craig Brooks
    Craig Brooks wrote these comments: Might be an idea worth considering for a college town. This Article from StarTribune.com has been sent to you by
    Message 1 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
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      Craig Brooks wrote these comments: Might be an idea worth considering for a college town.

      This Article from StarTribune.com has been sent to you by CraigBrooks.
      *Please note, the sender's identity has not been verified.

      The full Article, with any associated images and links can be viewed here.
      Store curbs students��� curbside trash
      KARA McGUIRE, Star Tribune

      With their husbands in school, Grace Huang and Lori Luo don't have a lot of money to spend furnishing their University of Minnesota apartments. But there they were Tuesday, struggling to carry a 45-piece china set, some crystal bowls, a photo album and a candelabra to student family housing. The price tag? There wasn't one.

      The duo went shopping at the neighborhood free store, a pilot program developed by the Southeast Como Improvement Association in an effort to keep unwanted furniture and household goods left behind by students off lawns and out of dumpsters.

      Piles of furniture turned garbage dot the streets of college towns around the country come moving day. With money tight and going green all the rage, college campuses and neighborhood groups are working to curb the problem. Some schools, such as West Virginia University, collect items for a massive rummage sale with the proceeds going to charity. Others donate unwanted goods directly to charity. Minnesota State University works with a local thrift store.

      A neighborhood group bordering the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus created the MIMO free store (MIMO stands for move-in, move-out) to keep the curbs clean and appeal to budget-conscious students.

      It's moving week, and the furniture cluttering Wendy Menken's neighborhood could furnish many of the rented houses in the area. An upturned side table. A computer monitor. An assortment of tacky couches, all waiting for scavengers or the city's garbage trucks to make the rounds. Some years it's worse -- like when it rains, warping particle board shelves and fizzing electronics, or when vandals destroy perfectly usable items.

      "It gets to the point where the rest of the city is having a nice, long Labor Day weekend while we're sitting here surrounded by garbage," said Menken, 49, the neighborhood association's board president. "What a way to end the summer."

      With college debt at a record high and scant job opportunities for graduates, one would think students would hang onto their big ticket possessions. But that's not always a possibility, Justin Eibenholzl, MIMO's coordinator explained.

      Maybe the truck that the renters planned to borrow falls through and they can only move what fits in their car. The friend who claimed to want their desk never shows. A roommate with a nicer microwave moves in. Or a lamp doesn't fit with the new design scheme. Whatever the reason, "the end result is it ends up curbside," he said.

      The free store idea is supported by a $25,000 grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, plus funding from the McKnight Foundation and the Southeast neighborhood group. "Since about 40 percent of our nation's greenhouse gases are tied to producing products, it's really important that we get as much use out of the natural resources in those products as possible," MPCA waste prevention specialist Madalyn Cioci said. It also keeps furniture out of city incinerators and is a fairly straightforward model to replicate.

      This spring's effort kept 4,400 pounds of stuff out of landfills. For this round, volunteers picked up about 1,500 pounds of desks, lamps and coffee tables on Monday; hundreds of pounds more have been dropped off during store hours.

      MIMO is housed in the University of Minnesota's ReUse warehouse. The building always is a scavenger's paradise, filled with surplus office, lab and hospital equipment from around the University at low prices. It's open to the public every Thursday and will be open during the free store's 10-day run as well.

      Without the free store, Anna Fowler isn't sure what she would have done with the futon that she had inherited with her apartment but her landlord now insisted she discard. But before she even pulled away from the ReUse warehouse loading dock, her problem morphed into a solution for an international graduate student, who'd already called dibs on the black frame and mattress. Other items, like the Bing Crosby Christmas LP, were still there for the taking.

      Although the free store is designed for students and households in the neighborhoods bordering the university, the tough economic times have brought some shoppers from afar this year.

      In addition to keeping her neighborhood clean and ultimately keeping taxes lower, Menken hopes the free store will cause students to rethink the practice of taking back-to-school trips to the big-box stores with mom and dad and discarding the goods nine months later. "It's a very disposable mentality," she said." We're trying to intervene, to educate."

      Kara McGuire • 612-673-7293

    • Green, Deacon Justin
      Thank you, Craig, for circulating this article. Every spring, when the curbs are littered with furniture and household equipment discarded by Winona State
      Message 2 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
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        Thank you, Craig, for circulating this article.  Every spring, when the curbs are littered with furniture and household equipment discarded by Winona State students, I hear people saying – there ought to be a better way.  Maybe we put this on the agenda for the Roundtable meeting on September 30.  Perhaps someone in the group is willing to take leadership and organize an effort to rescue these discarded items for use by neighbors who have less.

         

        Justin

         

        From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Craig Brooks
        Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 6:33 AM
        To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

         

         

        Craig Brooks wrote these comments: Might be an idea worth considering for a college town.


        This Article from StarTribune.com has been sent to you by CraigBrooks.
        *Please note, the sender's identity has not been verified.

        The full Article, with any associated images and links can be viewed here.

        Store curbs students??? curbside trash
        KARA McGUIRE, Star Tribune

        With their husbands in school, Grace Huang and Lori Luo don't have a lot of money to spend furnishing their University of Minnesota apartments. But there they were Tuesday, struggling to carry a 45-piece china set, some crystal bowls, a photo album and a candelabra to student family housing. The price tag? There wasn't one.

        The duo went shopping at the neighborhood free store, a pilot program developed by the Southeast Como Improvement Association in an effort to keep unwanted furniture and household goods left behind by students off lawns and out of dumpsters.

        Piles of furniture turned garbage dot the streets of college towns around the country come moving day. With money tight and going green all the rage, college campuses and neighborhood groups are working to curb the problem. Some schools, such as West Virginia University, collect items for a massive rummage sale with the proceeds going to charity. Others donate unwanted goods directly to charity. Minnesota State University works with a local thrift store.

        A neighborhood group bordering the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus created the MIMO free store (MIMO stands for move-in, move-out) to keep the curbs clean and appeal to budget-conscious students.

        It's moving week, and the furniture cluttering Wendy Menken's neighborhood could furnish many of the rented houses in the area. An upturned side table. A computer monitor. An assortment of tacky couches, all waiting for scavengers or the city's garbage trucks to make the rounds. Some years it's worse -- like when it rains, warping particle board shelves and fizzing electronics, or when vandals destroy perfectly usable items.

        "It gets to the point where the rest of the city is having a nice, long Labor Day weekend while we're sitting here surrounded by garbage," said Menken, 49, the neighborhood association's board president. "What a way to end the summer."

        With college debt at a record high and scant job opportunities for graduates, one would think students would hang onto their big ticket possessions. But that's not always a possibility, Justin Eibenholzl, MIMO's coordinator explained.

        Maybe the truck that the renters planned to borrow falls through and they can only move what fits in their car. The friend who claimed to want their desk never shows. A roommate with a nicer microwave moves in. Or a lamp doesn't fit with the new design scheme. Whatever the reason, "the end result is it ends up curbside," he said.

        The free store idea is supported by a $25,000 grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, plus funding from the McKnight Foundation and the Southeast neighborhood group. "Since about 40 percent of our nation's greenhouse gases are tied to producing products, it's really important that we get as much use out of the natural resources in those products as possible," MPCA waste prevention specialist Madalyn Cioci said. It also keeps furniture out of city incinerators and is a fairly straightforward model to replicate.

        This spring's effort kept 4,400 pounds of stuff out of landfills. For this round, volunteers picked up about 1,500 pounds of desks, lamps and coffee tables on Monday; hundreds of pounds more have been dropped off during store hours.

        MIMO is housed in the University of Minnesota's ReUse warehouse. The building always is a scavenger's paradise, filled with surplus office, lab and hospital equipment from around the University at low prices. It's open to the public every Thursday and will be open during the free store's 10-day run as well.

        Without the free store, Anna Fowler isn't sure what she would have done with the futon that she had inherited with her apartment but her landlord now insisted she discard. But before she even pulled away from the ReUse warehouse loading dock, her problem morphed into a solution for an international graduate student, who'd already called dibs on the black frame and mattress. Other items, like the Bing Crosby Christmas LP, were still there for the taking.

        Although the free store is designed for students and households in the neighborhoods bordering the university, the tough economic times have brought some shoppers from afar this year.

        In addition to keeping her neighborhood clean and ultimately keeping taxes lower, Menken hopes the free store will cause students to rethink the practice of taking back-to-school trips to the big-box stores with mom and dad and discarding the goods nine months later. "It's a very disposable mentality," she said." We're trying to intervene, to educate."

        Kara McGuire • 612-673-7293

      • Admin WCF
        This would be a great program to be sponsored by Waste Management or local trash companies. I remember my mother-in-law talking about a city wide free day
        Message 3 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
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          This would be a great program to be sponsored by Waste Management or local trash companies.  I remember my mother-in-law talking about a city wide “free day” in Iowa  where people would put furniture or items in good shape out  that you could drive around and take what was needed.   What a win win.  It’s sad when you hear that people want to dumpster dive at the end of the school year with a risk of getting a ticket from the police.

           

          Jeni

           

          From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Green, Deacon Justin
          Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 8:49 AM
          To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

           

           

          Thank you, Craig, for circulating this article.  Every spring, when the curbs are littered with furniture and household equipment discarded by Winona State students, I hear people saying – there ought to be a better way.  Maybe we put this on the agenda for the Roundtable meeting on September 30.  Perhaps someone in the group is willing to take leadership and organize an effort to rescue these discarded items for use by neighbors who have less.

           

          Justin

           

          From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Craig Brooks
          Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 6:33 AM
          To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

           

           

          Craig Brooks wrote these comments: Might be an idea worth considering for a college town.



          This Article from StarTribune.com has been sent to you by CraigBrooks.
          *Please note, the sender's identity has not been verified.

          The full Article, with any associated images and links can be viewed here.

          Store curbs students??? curbside trash
          KARA McGUIRE, Star Tribune

          With their husbands in school, Grace Huang and Lori Luo don't have a lot of money to spend furnishing their University of Minnesota apartments. But there they were Tuesday, struggling to carry a 45-piece china set, some crystal bowls, a photo album and a candelabra to student family housing. The price tag? There wasn't one.

          The duo went shopping at the neighborhood free store, a pilot program developed by the Southeast Como Improvement Association in an effort to keep unwanted furniture and household goods left behind by students off lawns and out of dumpsters.

          Piles of furniture turned garbage dot the streets of college towns around the country come moving day. With money tight and going green all the rage, college campuses and neighborhood groups are working to curb the problem. Some schools, such as West Virginia University, collect items for a massive rummage sale with the proceeds going to charity. Others donate unwanted goods directly to charity. Minnesota State University works with a local thrift store.

          A neighborhood group bordering the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus created the MIMO free store (MIMO stands for move-in, move-out) to keep the curbs clean and appeal to budget-conscious students.

          It's moving week, and the furniture cluttering Wendy Menken's neighborhood could furnish many of the rented houses in the area. An upturned side table. A computer monitor. An assortment of tacky couches, all waiting for scavengers or the city's garbage trucks to make the rounds. Some years it's worse -- like when it rains, warping particle board shelves and fizzing electronics, or when vandals destroy perfectly usable items.

          "It gets to the point where the rest of the city is having a nice, long Labor Day weekend while we're sitting here surrounded by garbage," said Menken, 49, the neighborhood association's board president. "What a way to end the summer."

          With college debt at a record high and scant job opportunities for graduates, one would think students would hang onto their big ticket possessions. But that's not always a possibility, Justin Eibenholzl, MIMO's coordinator explained.

          Maybe the truck that the renters planned to borrow falls through and they can only move what fits in their car. The friend who claimed to want their desk never shows. A roommate with a nicer microwave moves in. Or a lamp doesn't fit with the new design scheme. Whatever the reason, "the end result is it ends up curbside," he said.

          The free store idea is supported by a $25,000 grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, plus funding from the McKnight Foundation and the Southeast neighborhood group. "Since about 40 percent of our nation's greenhouse gases are tied to producing products, it's really important that we get as much use out of the natural resources in those products as possible," MPCA waste prevention specialist Madalyn Cioci said. It also keeps furniture out of city incinerators and is a fairly straightforward model to replicate.

          This spring's effort kept 4,400 pounds of stuff out of landfills. For this round, volunteers picked up about 1,500 pounds of desks, lamps and coffee tables on Monday; hundreds of pounds more have been dropped off during store hours.

          MIMO is housed in the University of Minnesota's ReUse warehouse. The building always is a scavenger's paradise, filled with surplus office, lab and hospital equipment from around the University at low prices. It's open to the public every Thursday and will be open during the free store's 10-day run as well.

          Without the free store, Anna Fowler isn't sure what she would have done with the futon that she had inherited with her apartment but her landlord now insisted she discard. But before she even pulled away from the ReUse warehouse loading dock, her problem morphed into a solution for an international graduate student, who'd already called dibs on the black frame and mattress. Other items, like the Bing Crosby Christmas LP, were still there for the taking.

          Although the free store is designed for students and households in the neighborhoods bordering the university, the tough economic times have brought some shoppers from afar this year.

          In addition to keeping her neighborhood clean and ultimately keeping taxes lower, Menken hopes the free store will cause students to rethink the practice of taking back-to-school trips to the big-box stores with mom and dad and discarding the goods nine months later. "It's a very disposable mentality," she said." We're trying to intervene, to educate."

          Kara McGuire • 612-673-7293

        • Tina Anderson
          Maybe this would be something the Re-Store could coordinate in conjunction with maybe Red Box Plus? All that would really be needed would be a space, a time
          Message 4 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
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            Maybe this would be something the Re-Store could coordinate in conjunction with maybe Red Box Plus? All that would really be needed would be a space, a time frame and a place that will take the left over items. Just a thought.

             

             

            Tina Anderson

             

            Tina Anderson

            President
            Winona Community Foundation
            507.454.6511 / preswcf@...

             

            Twitter: @wcfpres

            Facebook: Winona Comm-Found

             

            "If you want to go quickly go alone.  If you want to go far, go together." To learn how you can contribute to the Winona Community Foundation's Youth in Philanthropy fund, local grant-making programs or to create your own Fund to support your special charitable passion, go to www.winonacommunityfoundation.org or call the Foundation at 507-454-6511.

             

             

             

            From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Green, Deacon Justin
            Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 8:49 AM
            To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

             

             

            Thank you, Craig, for circulating this article.  Every spring, when the curbs are littered with furniture and household equipment discarded by Winona State students, I hear people saying – there ought to be a better way.  Maybe we put this on the agenda for the Roundtable meeting on September 30.  Perhaps someone in the group is willing to take leadership and organize an effort to rescue these discarded items for use by neighbors who have less.

             

            Justin

             

            From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Craig Brooks
            Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 6:33 AM
            To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

             

             

            Craig Brooks wrote these comments: Might be an idea worth considering for a college town.



            This Article from StarTribune.com has been sent to you by CraigBrooks.
            *Please note, the sender's identity has not been verified.

            The full Article, with any associated images and links can be viewed here.

            Store curbs students??? curbside trash
            KARA McGUIRE, Star Tribune

            With their husbands in school, Grace Huang and Lori Luo don't have a lot of money to spend furnishing their University of Minnesota apartments. But there they were Tuesday, struggling to carry a 45-piece china set, some crystal bowls, a photo album and a candelabra to student family housing. The price tag? There wasn't one.

            The duo went shopping at the neighborhood free store, a pilot program developed by the Southeast Como Improvement Association in an effort to keep unwanted furniture and household goods left behind by students off lawns and out of dumpsters.

            Piles of furniture turned garbage dot the streets of college towns around the country come moving day. With money tight and going green all the rage, college campuses and neighborhood groups are working to curb the problem. Some schools, such as West Virginia University, collect items for a massive rummage sale with the proceeds going to charity. Others donate unwanted goods directly to charity. Minnesota State University works with a local thrift store.

            A neighborhood group bordering the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus created the MIMO free store (MIMO stands for move-in, move-out) to keep the curbs clean and appeal to budget-conscious students.

            It's moving week, and the furniture cluttering Wendy Menken's neighborhood could furnish many of the rented houses in the area. An upturned side table. A computer monitor. An assortment of tacky couches, all waiting for scavengers or the city's garbage trucks to make the rounds. Some years it's worse -- like when it rains, warping particle board shelves and fizzing electronics, or when vandals destroy perfectly usable items.

            "It gets to the point where the rest of the city is having a nice, long Labor Day weekend while we're sitting here surrounded by garbage," said Menken, 49, the neighborhood association's board president. "What a way to end the summer."

            With college debt at a record high and scant job opportunities for graduates, one would think students would hang onto their big ticket possessions. But that's not always a possibility, Justin Eibenholzl, MIMO's coordinator explained.

            Maybe the truck that the renters planned to borrow falls through and they can only move what fits in their car. The friend who claimed to want their desk never shows. A roommate with a nicer microwave moves in. Or a lamp doesn't fit with the new design scheme. Whatever the reason, "the end result is it ends up curbside," he said.

            The free store idea is supported by a $25,000 grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, plus funding from the McKnight Foundation and the Southeast neighborhood group. "Since about 40 percent of our nation's greenhouse gases are tied to producing products, it's really important that we get as much use out of the natural resources in those products as possible," MPCA waste prevention specialist Madalyn Cioci said. It also keeps furniture out of city incinerators and is a fairly straightforward model to replicate.

            This spring's effort kept 4,400 pounds of stuff out of landfills. For this round, volunteers picked up about 1,500 pounds of desks, lamps and coffee tables on Monday; hundreds of pounds more have been dropped off during store hours.

            MIMO is housed in the University of Minnesota's ReUse warehouse. The building always is a scavenger's paradise, filled with surplus office, lab and hospital equipment from around the University at low prices. It's open to the public every Thursday and will be open during the free store's 10-day run as well.

            Without the free store, Anna Fowler isn't sure what she would have done with the futon that she had inherited with her apartment but her landlord now insisted she discard. But before she even pulled away from the ReUse warehouse loading dock, her problem morphed into a solution for an international graduate student, who'd already called dibs on the black frame and mattress. Other items, like the Bing Crosby Christmas LP, were still there for the taking.

            Although the free store is designed for students and households in the neighborhoods bordering the university, the tough economic times have brought some shoppers from afar this year.

            In addition to keeping her neighborhood clean and ultimately keeping taxes lower, Menken hopes the free store will cause students to rethink the practice of taking back-to-school trips to the big-box stores with mom and dad and discarding the goods nine months later. "It's a very disposable mentality," she said." We're trying to intervene, to educate."

            Kara McGuire • 612-673-7293

          • Beth Moe
            I believe the ReStore already does work with the colleges at the end of the school year to collect items. (Nancy or Stephanie, correct me if I m wrong.) And I
            Message 5 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
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              I believe the ReStore already does work with the colleges at the end of the school year to collect items. (Nancy or Stephanie, correct me if I’m wrong.) And I believe they are able to salvage quite a bit.

               

              Beth

               


              From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tina Anderson
              Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 10:18 AM
              To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

               

               

              Maybe this would be something the Re-Store could coordinate in conjunction with maybe Red Box Plus? All that would really be needed would be a space, a time frame and a place that will take the left over items. Just a thought.

               

               

              Tina Anderson

               

              Tina Anderson

              President
              Winona Community Foundation
              507.454.6511 / preswcf@...

               

              Twitter: @wcfpres

              Facebook: Winona Comm-Found

               

              "If you want to go quickly go alone.  If you want to go far, go together." To learn how you can contribute to the Winona Community Foundation's Youth in Philanthropy fund, local grant-making programs or to create your own Fund to support your special charitable passion, go to www.winonacommunityfoundation.org or call the Foundation at 507-454-6511.

               

               

               

              From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Green, Deacon Justin
              Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 8:49 AM
              To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

               

               

              Thank you, Craig, for circulating this article.  Every spring, when the curbs are littered with furniture and household equipment discarded by Winona State students, I hear people saying – there ought to be a better way.  Maybe we put this on the agenda for the Roundtable meeting on September 30.  Perhaps someone in the group is willing to take leadership and organize an effort to rescue these discarded items for use by neighbors who have less.

               

              Justin

               

              From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Craig Brooks
              Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 6:33 AM
              To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

               

               

              Craig Brooks wrote these comments: Might be an idea worth considering for a college town.




              This Article from StarTribune.com has been sent to you by CraigBrooks.
              *Please note, the sender's identity has not been verified.

              The full Article, with any associated images and links can be viewed here.

              Store curbs students??? curbside trash
              KARA McGUIRE, Star Tribune

              With their husbands in school, Grace Huang and Lori Luo don't have a lot of money to spend furnishing their University of Minnesota apartments. But there they were Tuesday, struggling to carry a 45-piece china set, some crystal bowls, a photo album and a candelabra to student family housing. The price tag? There wasn't one.

              The duo went shopping at the neighborhood free store, a pilot program developed by the Southeast Como Improvement Association in an effort to keep unwanted furniture and household goods left behind by students off lawns and out of dumpsters.

              Piles of furniture turned garbage dot the streets of college towns around the country come moving day. With money tight and going green all the rage, college campuses and neighborhood groups are working to curb the problem. Some schools, such as West Virginia University, collect items for a massive rummage sale with the proceeds going to charity. Others donate unwanted goods directly to charity. Minnesota State University works with a local thrift store.

              A neighborhood group bordering the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus created the MIMO free store (MIMO stands for move-in, move-out) to keep the curbs clean and appeal to budget-conscious students.

              It's moving week, and the furniture cluttering Wendy Menken's neighborhood could furnish many of the rented houses in the area. An upturned side table. A computer monitor. An assortment of tacky couches, all waiting for scavengers or the city's garbage trucks to make the rounds. Some years it's worse -- like when it rains, warping particle board shelves and fizzing electronics, or when vandals destroy perfectly usable items.

              "It gets to the point where the rest of the city is having a nice, long Labor Day weekend while we're sitting here surrounded by garbage," said Menken, 49, the neighborhood association's board president. "What a way to end the summer."

              With college debt at a record high and scant job opportunities for graduates, one would think students would hang onto their big ticket possessions. But that's not always a possibility, Justin Eibenholzl, MIMO's coordinator explained.

              Maybe the truck that the renters planned to borrow falls through and they can only move what fits in their car. The friend who claimed to want their desk never shows. A roommate with a nicer microwave moves in. Or a lamp doesn't fit with the new design scheme. Whatever the reason, "the end result is it ends up curbside," he said.

              The free store idea is supported by a $25,000 grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, plus funding from the McKnight Foundation and the Southeast neighborhood group. "Since about 40 percent of our nation's greenhouse gases are tied to producing products, it's really important that we get as much use out of the natural resources in those products as possible," MPCA waste prevention specialist Madalyn Cioci said. It also keeps furniture out of city incinerators and is a fairly straightforward model to replicate.

              This spring's effort kept 4,400 pounds of stuff out of landfills. For this round, volunteers picked up about 1,500 pounds of desks, lamps and coffee tables on Monday; hundreds of pounds more have been dropped off during store hours.

              MIMO is housed in the University of Minnesota's ReUse warehouse. The building always is a scavenger's paradise, filled with surplus office, lab and hospital equipment from around the University at low prices. It's open to the public every Thursday and will be open during the free store's 10-day run as well.

              Without the free store, Anna Fowler isn't sure what she would have done with the futon that she had inherited with her apartment but her landlord now insisted she discard. But before she even pulled away from the ReUse warehouse loading dock, her problem morphed into a solution for an international graduate student, who'd already called dibs on the black frame and mattress. Other items, like the Bing Crosby Christmas LP, were still there for the taking.

              Although the free store is designed for students and households in the neighborhoods bordering the university, the tough economic times have brought some shoppers from afar this year.

              In addition to keeping her neighborhood clean and ultimately keeping taxes lower, Menken hopes the free store will cause students to rethink the practice of taking back-to-school trips to the big-box stores with mom and dad and discarding the goods nine months later. "It's a very disposable mentality," she said." We're trying to intervene, to educate."

              Kara McGuire • 612-673-7293

            • Jill Johnson
              The very good news is that this kind of reclamation from campuses for reuse has been happening here in Winona in conjunction w/the ReStore for a number of
              Message 6 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
              • 0 Attachment

                 

                The very good news is that this kind of reclamation from campuses for reuse has been happening here in Winona in conjunction w/the ReStore for a number of years. 

                They are already totally on top of it!

                 

                I’ll ask John, the ReStore manager, to send me a description of their procedure, and will then post it to this listserve so that everyone will be well versed in the what and when.

                 

                John will probably have some ideas for support that their program could benefit from as well, in case people want to help out in some way.

                 

                Thanks,

                Anne

                 

                 

                Anne Morse

                Sustainability Coordinator

                Winona County Environmental Services

                225 West 2nd Street

                Winona, MN  55987

                Office  507.457.6468

                Fax  507.457.6465

                Cell  507.313.3171

                 

                 

                 

                From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Craig Brooks
                Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 6:33 AM
                To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                 

                 

                Craig Brooks wrote these comments: Might be an idea worth considering for a college town.


                This Article from StarTribune.com has been sent to you by CraigBrooks.
                *Please note, the sender's identity has not been verified.

                The full Article, with any associated images and links can be viewed here.

                Store curbs students’ curbside trash
                KARA McGUIRE, Star Tribune

                With their husbands in school, Grace Huang and Lori Luo don't have a lot of money to spend furnishing their University of Minnesota apartments. But there they were Tuesday, struggling to carry a 45-piece china set, some crystal bowls, a photo album and a candelabra to student family housing. The price tag? There wasn't one.

                The duo went shopping at the neighborhood free store, a pilot program developed by the Southeast Como Improvement Association in an effort to keep unwanted furniture and household goods left behind by students off lawns and out of dumpsters.

                Piles of furniture turned garbage dot the streets of college towns around the country come moving day. With money tight and going green all the rage, college campuses and neighborhood groups are working to curb the problem. Some schools, such as West Virginia University, collect items for a massive rummage sale with the proceeds going to charity. Others donate unwanted goods directly to charity. Minnesota State University works with a local thrift store.

                A neighborhood group bordering the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus created the MIMO free store (MIMO stands for move-in, move-out) to keep the curbs clean and appeal to budget-conscious students.

                It's moving week, and the furniture cluttering Wendy Menken's neighborhood could furnish many of the rented houses in the area. An upturned side table. A computer monitor. An assortment of tacky couches, all waiting for scavengers or the city's garbage trucks to make the rounds. Some years it's worse -- like when it rains, warping particle board shelves and fizzing electronics, or when vandals destroy perfectly usable items.

                "It gets to the point where the rest of the city is having a nice, long Labor Day weekend while we're sitting here surrounded by garbage," said Menken, 49, the neighborhood association's board president. "What a way to end the summer."

                With college debt at a record high and scant job opportunities for graduates, one would think students would hang onto their big ticket possessions. But that's not always a possibility, Justin Eibenholzl, MIMO's coordinator explained.

                Maybe the truck that the renters planned to borrow falls through and they can only move what fits in their car. The friend who claimed to want their desk never shows. A roommate with a nicer microwave moves in. Or a lamp doesn't fit with the new design scheme. Whatever the reason, "the end result is it ends up curbside," he said.

                The free store idea is supported by a $25,000 grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, plus funding from the McKnight Foundation and the Southeast neighborhood group. "Since about 40 percent of our nation's greenhouse gases are tied to producing products, it's really important that we get as much use out of the natural resources in those products as possible," MPCA waste prevention specialist Madalyn Cioci said. It also keeps furniture out of city incinerators and is a fairly straightforward model to replicate.

                This spring's effort kept 4,400 pounds of stuff out of landfills. For this round, volunteers picked up about 1,500 pounds of desks, lamps and coffee tables on Monday; hundreds of pounds more have been dropped off during store hours.

                MIMO is housed in the University of Minnesota's ReUse warehouse. The building always is a scavenger's paradise, filled with surplus office, lab and hospital equipment from around the University at low prices. It's open to the public every Thursday and will be open during the free store's 10-day run as well.

                Without the free store, Anna Fowler isn't sure what she would have done with the futon that she had inherited with her apartment but her landlord now insisted she discard. But before she even pulled away from the ReUse warehouse loading dock, her problem morphed into a solution for an international graduate student, who'd already called dibs on the black frame and mattress. Other items, like the Bing Crosby Christmas LP, were still there for the taking.

                Although the free store is designed for students and households in the neighborhoods bordering the university, the tough economic times have brought some shoppers from afar this year.

                In addition to keeping her neighborhood clean and ultimately keeping taxes lower, Menken hopes the free store will cause students to rethink the practice of taking back-to-school trips to the big-box stores with mom and dad and discarding the goods nine months later. "It's a very disposable mentality," she said." We're trying to intervene, to educate."

                Kara McGuire • 612-673-7293

              • Shari_Klippenstein@usc.salvationarmy.org
                Yes the restore along with Salvation Army have a collection program on the WSU and SMU campuses these past two springs. As far as I know, we plan on doing it
                Message 7 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  Yes the restore along with Salvation Army have a collection program on the WSU and SMU campuses these past two springs. As far as I know, we plan on doing it again. This past year we did not collect much. However, I hope to have more advertising this upcoming spring so students can recycle their stuff.

                  Dumpster diving is something that happens at our dumpsters every evening after the store closes. We use to lock our dumpsters, but we were running up such a bill to replace locks and repair our doors when people would vandalize them to break in. We even have parents putting their children in the dumpsters to throw them discarded items. It is such a safety problem we have to involve the police at times. The more we as a community can do to provide for the needy the better.

                  Shari Klippenstein
                  Salvation Army Thrift Store-Winona
                  Store Supervisor
                  507-474-2400




                  "Beth Moe" <bfmoe@...>
                  Sent by: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com

                  09/01/2010 01:26 PM

                  Please respond to
                  PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com

                  To
                  <PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com>
                  cc
                  Subject
                  RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com





                   

                  I believe the ReStore already does work with the colleges at the end of the school year to collect items. (Nancy or Stephanie, correct me if I’m wrong.) And I believe they are able to salvage quite a bit.

                   

                  Beth

                   


                  From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tina Anderson
                  Sent:
                  Wednesday, September 01, 2010 10:18 AM
                  To:
                  PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject:
                  RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                   

                   

                  Maybe this would be something the Re-Store could coordinate in conjunction with maybe Red Box Plus? All that would really be needed would be a space, a time frame and a place that will take the left over items. Just a thought.

                   

                   

                  Tina Anderson

                   

                  Tina Anderson

                  President
                  Winona Community Foundation

                  507.454.6511
                  / preswcf@...

                   

                  Twitter: @wcfpres

                  Facebook: Winona Comm-Found

                   

                  "If you want to go quickly go alone.  If you want to go far, go together."To learn how you can contribute to the Winona Community Foundation's Youth in Philanthropy fund, local grant-making programs or to create your own Fund to support your special charitable passion, go to www.winonacommunityfoundation.orgor call the Foundation at 507-454-6511.

                   

                   

                   

                  From:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Green, Deacon Justin
                  Sent:
                  Wednesday, September 01, 2010 8:49 AM
                  To:
                  PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject:
                  RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                   

                   

                  Thank you, Craig, for circulating this article.  Every spring, when the curbs are littered with furniture and household equipment discarded by Winona State students, I hear people saying – there ought to be a better way.  Maybe we put this on the agenda for the Roundtable meeting on September 30.  Perhaps someone in the group is willing to take leadership and organize an effort to rescue these discarded items for use by neighbors who have less.

                   

                  Justin

                   

                  From:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Craig Brooks
                  Sent:
                  Wednesday, September 01, 2010 6:33 AM
                  To:
                  PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject:
                  [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                   

                   

                  Craig Brooks wrote these comments: Might be an idea worth considering for a college town.



                  This Article from StarTribune.comhas been sent to you by CraigBrooks.
                  *Please note, the sender's identity has not been verified.


                  The full Article, with any associated images and links can be viewed
                  here.
                  Store curbs students??? curbside trash
                  KARA McGUIRE, Star Tribune

                  With their husbands in school, Grace Huang and Lori Luo don't have a lot of money to spend furnishing their University of Minnesota apartments. But there they were Tuesday, struggling to carry a 45-piece china set, some crystal bowls, a photo album and a candelabra to student family housing. The price tag? There wasn't one.

                  The duo went shopping at the neighborhood free store, a pilot program developed by the Southeast Como Improvement Association in an effort to keep unwanted furniture and household goods left behind by students off lawns and out of dumpsters.

                  Piles of furniture turned garbage dot the streets of college towns around the country come moving day. With money tight and going green all the rage, college campuses and neighborhood groups are working to curb the problem. Some schools, such as West Virginia University, collect items for a massive rummage sale with the proceeds going to charity. Others donate unwanted goods directly to charity. Minnesota State University works with a local thrift store.

                  A neighborhood group bordering the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus created the MIMO free store (MIMO stands for move-in, move-out) to keep the curbs clean and appeal to budget-conscious students.

                  It's moving week, and the furniture cluttering Wendy Menken's neighborhood could furnish many of the rented houses in the area. An upturned side table. A computer monitor. An assortment of tacky couches, all waiting for scavengers or the city's garbage trucks to make the rounds. Some years it's worse -- like when it rains, warping particle board shelves and fizzing electronics, or when vandals destroy perfectly usable items.

                  "It gets to the point where the rest of the city is having a nice, long Labor Day weekend while we're sitting here surrounded by garbage," said Menken, 49, the neighborhood association's board president. "What a way to end the summer."

                  With college debt at a record high and scant job opportunities for graduates, one would think students would hang onto their big ticket possessions. But that's not always a possibility, Justin Eibenholzl, MIMO's coordinator explained.

                  Maybe the truck that the renters planned to borrow falls through and they can only move what fits in their car. The friend who claimed to want their desk never shows. A roommate with a nicer microwave moves in. Or a lamp doesn't fit with the new design scheme. Whatever the reason, "the end result is it ends up curbside," he said.

                  The free store idea is supported by a $25,000 grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, plus funding from the McKnight Foundation and the Southeast neighborhood group. "Since about 40 percent of our nation's greenhouse gases are tied to producing products, it's really important that we get as much use out of the natural resources in those products as possible," MPCA waste prevention specialist Madalyn Cioci said. It also keeps furniture out of city incinerators and is a fairly straightforward model to replicate.

                  This spring's effort kept 4,400 pounds of stuff out of landfills. For this round, volunteers picked up about 1,500 pounds of desks, lamps and coffee tables on Monday; hundreds of pounds more have been dropped off during store hours.

                  MIMO is housed in the University of Minnesota's ReUse warehouse. The building always is a scavenger's paradise, filled with surplus office, lab and hospital equipment from around the University at low prices. It's open to the public every Thursday and will be open during the free store's 10-day run as well.

                  Without the free store, Anna Fowler isn't sure what she would have done with the futon that she had inherited with her apartment but her landlord now insisted she discard. But before she even pulled away from the ReUse warehouse loading dock, her problem morphed into a solution for an international graduate student, who'd already called dibs on the black frame and mattress. Other items, like the Bing Crosby Christmas LP, were still there for the taking.

                  Although the free store is designed for students and households in the neighborhoods bordering the university, the tough economic times have brought some shoppers from afar this year.

                  In addition to keeping her neighborhood clean and ultimately keeping taxes lower, Menken hopes the free store will cause students to rethink the practice of taking back-to-school trips to the big-box stores with mom and dad and discarding the goods nine months later. "It's a very disposable mentality," she said." We're trying to intervene, to educate."

                  Kara McGuire • 612-673-7293




                  This mail and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the originator of the message.

                  Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender, except where the sender specifies and with authority, states them to be the views of The Salvation Army.

                  usc

                • Englich, Vicki L
                  I know that the universities have worked with the Re-Store and Salvation Army as well as the Catholic Worker Houses to give away usable goods that would
                  Message 8 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment

                    I know that the universities have worked with the Re-Store and Salvation Army as well as the Catholic Worker Houses to give away usable goods that would otherwise find their way into the landfill. What I like about this article is that the items are free. I support the stores in town that use donations for their missions, but a location for free items could  reduce the vandalism that Shari discusses and provides for people who are in need.

                     

                    The idea needs a lot of planning, and I have corresponded with Justin that I would be interested in working on the project. I have also notified the WSU Environmental Club about the idea. They have contacts with the group who sponsors the Really Really Free Market that takes place once a month.

                     

                    I believe the Winona Housing Association also takes usable furniture to places like the Re-Store rather than letting it languish on the curbs.

                     

                    Vicki Englich

                    WSU Community Liaison

                    457-2949

                     

                    From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Shari_Klippenstein@...
                    Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 3:46 PM
                    To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                    Cc: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                     

                     

                    Yes the restore along with Salvation Army have a collection program on the WSU and SMU campuses these past two springs. As far as I know, we plan on doing it again. This past year we did not collect much. However, I hope to have more advertising this upcoming spring so students can recycle their stuff.

                    Dumpster diving is something that happens at our dumpsters every evening after the store closes. We use to lock our dumpsters, but we were running up such a bill to replace locks and repair our doors when people would vandalize them to break in. We even have parents putting their children in the dumpsters to throw them discarded items. It is such a safety problem we have to involve the police at times. The more we as a community can do to provide for the needy the better.

                    Shari Klippenstein
                    Salvation Army Thrift Store-Winona
                    Store Supervisor
                    507-474-2400



                    "Beth Moe" <bfmoe@...>
                    Sent by: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com

                    09/01/2010 01:26 PM

                    Please respond to
                    PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com

                    To

                    <PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com>

                    cc

                    Subject

                    RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                     




                     

                    I believe the ReStore already does work with the colleges at the end of the school year to collect items. (Nancy or Stephanie, correct me if I’m wrong.) And I believe they are able to salvage quite a bit.

                     

                    Beth

                     


                    From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tina Anderson
                    Sent:
                    Wednesday, September 01, 2010 10:18 AM
                    To:
                    PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject:
                    RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                     

                     

                    Maybe this would be something the Re-Store could coordinate in conjunction with maybe Red Box Plus? All that would really be needed would be a space, a time frame and a place that will take the left over items. Just a thought.

                     

                     

                    Tina Anderson

                     

                    Tina Anderson

                    President
                    Winona Community Foundation

                    507.454.6511
                    / preswcf@...

                     

                    Twitter: @wcfpres

                    Facebook: Winona Comm-Found

                     

                    "If you want to go quickly go alone.  If you want to go far, go together."To learn how you can contribute to the Winona Community Foundation's Youth in Philanthropy fund, local grant-making programs or to create your own Fund to support your special charitable passion, go to www.winonacommunityfoundation.orgor call the Foundation at 507-454-6511.

                     

                     

                     

                    From:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Green, Deacon Justin
                    Sent:
                    Wednesday, September 01, 2010 8:49 AM
                    To:
                    PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject:
                    RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                     

                     

                    Thank you, Craig, for circulating this article.  Every spring, when the curbs are littered with furniture and household equipment discarded by Winona State students, I hear people saying – there ought to be a better way.  Maybe we put this on the agenda for the Roundtable meeting on September 30.  Perhaps someone in the group is willing to take leadership and organize an effort to rescue these discarded items for use by neighbors who have less.

                     

                    Justin

                     

                    From:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Craig Brooks
                    Sent:
                    Wednesday, September 01, 2010 6:33 AM
                    To:
                    PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject:
                    [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                     

                     

                    Craig Brooks wrote these comments: Might be an idea worth considering for a college town.


                    This Article from StarTribune.comhas been sent to you by CraigBrooks.
                    *Please note, the sender's identity has not been verified.


                    The full Article, with any associated images and links can be viewed
                    here.

                    Store curbs students??? curbside trash
                    KARA McGUIRE, Star Tribune

                    With their husbands in school, Grace Huang and Lori Luo don't have a lot of money to spend furnishing their University of Minnesota apartments. But there they were Tuesday, struggling to carry a 45-piece china set, some crystal bowls, a photo album and a candelabra to student family housing. The price tag? There wasn't one.

                    The duo went shopping at the neighborhood free store, a pilot program developed by the Southeast Como Improvement Association in an effort to keep unwanted furniture and household goods left behind by students off lawns and out of dumpsters.

                    Piles of furniture turned garbage dot the streets of college towns around the country come moving day. With money tight and going green all the rage, college campuses and neighborhood groups are working to curb the problem. Some schools, such as West Virginia University, collect items for a massive rummage sale with the proceeds going to charity. Others donate unwanted goods directly to charity. Minnesota State University works with a local thrift store.

                    A neighborhood group bordering the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus created the MIMO free store (MIMO stands for move-in, move-out) to keep the curbs clean and appeal to budget-conscious students.

                    It's moving week, and the furniture cluttering Wendy Menken's neighborhood could furnish many of the rented houses in the area. An upturned side table. A computer monitor. An assortment of tacky couches, all waiting for scavengers or the city's garbage trucks to make the rounds. Some years it's worse -- like when it rains, warping particle board shelves and fizzing electronics, or when vandals destroy perfectly usable items.

                    "It gets to the point where the rest of the city is having a nice, long Labor Day weekend while we're sitting here surrounded by garbage," said Menken, 49, the neighborhood association's board president. "What a way to end the summer."

                    With college debt at a record high and scant job opportunities for graduates, one would think students would hang onto their big ticket possessions. But that's not always a possibility, Justin Eibenholzl, MIMO's coordinator explained.

                    Maybe the truck that the renters planned to borrow falls through and they can only move what fits in their car. The friend who claimed to want their desk never shows. A roommate with a nicer microwave moves in. Or a lamp doesn't fit with the new design scheme. Whatever the reason, "the end result is it ends up curbside," he said.

                    The free store idea is supported by a $25,000 grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, plus funding from the McKnight Foundation and the Southeast neighborhood group. "Since about 40 percent of our nation's greenhouse gases are tied to producing products, it's really important that we get as much use out of the natural resources in those products as possible," MPCA waste prevention specialist Madalyn Cioci said. It also keeps furniture out of city incinerators and is a fairly straightforward model to replicate.

                    This spring's effort kept 4,400 pounds of stuff out of landfills. For this round, volunteers picked up about 1,500 pounds of desks, lamps and coffee tables on Monday; hundreds of pounds more have been dropped off during store hours.

                    MIMO is housed in the University of Minnesota's ReUse warehouse. The building always is a scavenger's paradise, filled with surplus office, lab and hospital equipment from around the University at low prices. It's open to the public every Thursday and will be open during the free store's 10-day run as well.

                    Without the free store, Anna Fowler isn't sure what she would have done with the futon that she had inherited with her apartment but her landlord now insisted she discard. But before she even pulled away from the ReUse warehouse loading dock, her problem morphed into a solution for an international graduate student, who'd already called dibs on the black frame and mattress. Other items, like the Bing Crosby Christmas LP, were still there for the taking.

                    Although the free store is designed for students and households in the neighborhoods bordering the university, the tough economic times have brought some shoppers from afar this year.

                    In addition to keeping her neighborhood clean and ultimately keeping taxes lower, Menken hopes the free store will cause students to rethink the practice of taking back-to-school trips to the big-box stores with mom and dad and discarding the goods nine months later. "It's a very disposable mentality," she said." We're trying to intervene, to educate."

                    Kara McGuire • 612-673-7293




                    This mail and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. If you have received this email in error please notify the originator of the message.

                    Any views expressed in this message are those of the individual sender, except where the sender specifies and with authority, states them to be the views of The Salvation Army.

                    usc

                  • Green, Deacon Justin
                    Just speaking personally, I did not know that there was a campus program, I don’t get on either campus very much. I do know that, in the spring, the streets
                    Message 9 of 20 , Sep 1, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment

                      Just speaking personally, I did not know that there was a campus program, I don’t get on either campus very much.  I do know that, in the spring, the streets east of campus, where I work and live, are filled with discarded furniture and the like.  So, while there is a good and functioning program on the campuses, what might be a valuable addition to the community is a program to keep furniture, kitchen utensils, small appliances, etc. off the street, out of the landfill and put them into the hands of people who can use them. 

                       

                      In any event, Craig’s email and the followup amount to a very useful conversation, and that’s very healthy.

                       

                      Justin

                       

                       

                      From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Shari_Klippenstein@...
                      Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 3:46 PM
                      To: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                      Cc: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                       

                       

                      Yes the restore along with Salvation Army have a collection program on the WSU and SMU campuses these past two springs. As far as I know, we plan on doing it again. This past year we did not collect much. However, I hope to have more advertising this upcoming spring so students can recycle their stuff.

                      Dumpster diving is something that happens at our dumpsters every evening after the store closes. We use to lock our dumpsters, but we were running up such a bill to replace locks and repair our doors when people would vandalize them to break in. We even have parents putting their children in the dumpsters to throw them discarded items. It is such a safety problem we have to involve the police at times. The more we as a community can do to provide for the needy the better.

                      Shari Klippenstein
                      Salvation Army Thrift Store-Winona
                      Store Supervisor
                      507-474-2400



                      "Beth Moe" <bfmoe@...>
                      Sent by: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com

                      09/01/2010 01:26 PM

                      Please respond to
                      PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com

                      To

                      <PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com>

                      cc

                      Subject

                      RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                       




                       

                      I believe the ReStore already does work with the colleges at the end of the school year to collect items. (Nancy or Stephanie, correct me if I’m wrong.) And I believe they are able to salvage quite a bit.

                       

                      Beth

                       


                      From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Tina Anderson
                      Sent:
                      Wednesday, September 01, 2010 10:18 AM
                      To:
                      PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject:
                      RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                       

                       

                      Maybe this would be something the Re-Store could coordinate in conjunction with maybe Red Box Plus? All that would really be needed would be a space, a time frame and a place that will take the left over items. Just a thought.

                       

                       

                      Tina Anderson

                       

                      Tina Anderson

                      President
                      Winona Community Foundation

                      507.454.6511
                      / preswcf@...

                       

                      Twitter: @wcfpres

                      Facebook: Winona Comm-Found

                       

                      "If you want to go quickly go alone.  If you want to go far, go together."To learn how you can contribute to the Winona Community Foundation's Youth in Philanthropy fund, local grant-making programs or to create your own Fund to support your special charitable passion, go to www.winonacommunityfoundation.orgor call the Foundation at 507-454-6511.

                       

                       

                       

                      From:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Green, Deacon Justin
                      Sent:
                      Wednesday, September 01, 2010 8:49 AM
                      To:
                      PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject:
                      RE: [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                       

                       

                      Thank you, Craig, for circulating this article.  Every spring, when the curbs are littered with furniture and household equipment discarded by Winona State students, I hear people saying – there ought to be a better way.  Maybe we put this on the agenda for the Roundtable meeting on September 30.  Perhaps someone in the group is willing to take leadership and organize an effort to rescue these discarded items for use by neighbors who have less.

                       

                      Justin

                       

                      From:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Craig Brooks
                      Sent:
                      Wednesday, September 01, 2010 6:33 AM
                      To:
                      PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject:
                      [PovertyRndTable] Craig Brooks sent you an article from startribune.com

                       

                       

                      Craig Brooks wrote these comments: Might be an idea worth considering for a college town.


                      This Article from StarTribune.comhas been sent to you by CraigBrooks.
                      *Please note, the sender's identity has not been verified.


                      The full Article, with any associated images and links can be viewed
                      here.

                      Store curbs students??? curbside trash
                      KARA McGUIRE, Star Tribune

                      With their husbands in school, Grace Huang and Lori Luo don't have a lot of money to spend furnishing their University of Minnesota apartments. But there they were Tuesday, struggling to carry a 45-piece china set, some crystal bowls, a photo album and a candelabra to student family housing. The price tag? There wasn't one.

                      The duo went shopping at the neighborhood free store, a pilot program developed by the Southeast Como Improvement Association in an effort to keep unwanted furniture and household goods left behind by students off lawns and out of dumpsters.

                      Piles of furniture turned garbage dot the streets of college towns around the country come moving day. With money tight and going green all the rage, college campuses and neighborhood groups are working to curb the problem. Some schools, such as West Virginia University, collect items for a massive rummage sale with the proceeds going to charity. Others donate unwanted goods directly to charity. Minnesota State University works with a local thrift store.

                      A neighborhood group bordering the University of Minnesota's Twin Cities campus created the MIMO free store (MIMO stands for move-in, move-out) to keep the curbs clean and appeal to budget-conscious students.

                      It's moving week, and the furniture cluttering Wendy Menken's neighborhood could furnish many of the rented houses in the area. An upturned side table. A computer monitor. An assortment of tacky couches, all waiting for scavengers or the city's garbage trucks to make the rounds. Some years it's worse -- like when it rains, warping particle board shelves and fizzing electronics, or when vandals destroy perfectly usable items.

                      "It gets to the point where the rest of the city is having a nice, long Labor Day weekend while we're sitting here surrounded by garbage," said Menken, 49, the neighborhood association's board president. "What a way to end the summer."

                      With college debt at a record high and scant job opportunities for graduates, one would think students would hang onto their big ticket possessions. But that's not always a possibility, Justin Eibenholzl, MIMO's coordinator explained.

                      Maybe the truck that the renters planned to borrow falls through and they can only move what fits in their car. The friend who claimed to want their desk never shows. A roommate with a nicer microwave moves in. Or a lamp doesn't fit with the new design scheme. Whatever the reason, "the end result is it ends up curbside," he said.

                      The free store idea is supported by a $25,000 grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, plus funding from the McKnight Foundation and the Southeast neighborhood group. "Since about 40 percent of our nation's greenhouse gases are tied to producing products, it's really important that we get as much use out of the natural resources in those products as possible," MPCA waste prevention specialist Madalyn Cioci said. It also keeps furniture out of city incinerators and is a fairly straightforward model to replicate.

                      This spring's effort kept 4,400 pounds of stuff out of landfills. For this round, volunteers picked up about 1,500 pounds of desks, lamps and coffee tables on Monday; hundreds of pounds more have been dropped off during store hours.

                      MIMO is housed in the University of Minnesota's ReUse warehouse. The building always is a scavenger's paradise, filled with surplus office, lab and hospital equipment from around the University at low prices. It's open to the public every Thursday and will be open during the free store's 10-day run as well.

                      Without the free store, Anna Fowler isn't sure what she would have done with the futon that she had inherited with her apartment but her landlord now insisted she discard. But before she even pulled away from the ReUse warehouse loading dock, her problem morphed into a solution for an international graduate student, who'd already called dibs on the black frame and mattress. Other items, like the Bing Crosby Christmas LP, were still there for the taking.

                      Although the free store is designed for students and households in the neighborhoods bordering the university, the tough economic times have brought some shoppers from afar this year.

                      In addition to keeping her neighborhood clean and ultimately keeping taxes lower, Menken hopes the free store will cause students to rethink the practice of taking back-to-school trips to the big-box stores with mom and dad and discarding the goods nine months later. "It's a very disposable mentality," she said." We're trying to intervene, to educate."

                      Kara McGuire • 612-673-7293




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                    • Craig Brooks
                      Craig Brooks wrote these comments: An interesting and wide spread debate. This Article from StarTribune.com has been sent to you by CraigBrooks. *Please note,
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                        Craig Brooks wrote these comments: An interesting and wide spread debate.

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                        JIM ADAMS, Star Tribune

                        Two Dakota County food shelves are turning down free federal food because of new rules that they say conflict with their goals of helping food recipients regain self-sufficiency.

                        Hastings Family Service and Neighbors Inc. in South St. Paul have declined to sign a new federal agreement requiring food shelves to serve needy people without requiring Social Security cards or income or address verification.

                        The agencies may be the only two among 270 food shelves receiving cheese, ground beef and other federal commodities to refuse to sign by October an agreement forbidding local food shelves from seeking to verify income or other recipient data, said Erin Sullivan Sutton, an assistant commissioner of children and family programs for the state Department of Human Services.

                        "It is unfortunate they have chosen not to sign," she said. It means "a loss of food otherwise available to families in their community." She said both food shelves doubled the federal food they received from 2008 to 2009, when Neighbors received 37,590 pounds and Hastings 28,195 pounds.

                        Hastings Family Service, one of the state's largest emergency food providers, has two social workers who help food recipients set up a budget to become self-supporting, said executive director Chris Koop. The agency needs evidence of recipients' income and expenses to do that.

                        "We could not ask for income verification, and that goes totally against our values of really working with families to get them on their feet again," Koop said. She said the declined food would cost about $15,000 a year at retail prices.

                        Churches say not to sign

                        Joan Rhodes, a Neighbors manager, said the community has been generous in supplying food and clothes for the needy. She said the agency asked its 32 member churches whether it should sign the agreement forbidding income verification, and the unanimous response was no.

                        "We just feel we need to be really conscientious of the donations entrusted to us," Rhodes said. "We feel we need to be good stewards."

                        Sullivan Sutton said requiring income data can be a barrier discouraging needy people from receiving free food. "Helping people gain more control over their finances is always a good thing," she said, "but they can work on budget issues on a voluntary basis."

                        The food is provided through the federal Emergency Food Assistance Program from the U.S. Agriculture Department's farm price subsidy programs and other sources. The government is a major supplier for area food shelves, providing 11.5 million pounds to state food and meal programs in 2009, officials said.

                        The state's largest food distributor is Second Harvest Heartland of St. Paul. It distributes the commodities to 195 food shelves in 41 counties and has asked the shelves to sign the agreement, said field director Barb Downs.

                        She said the agreement puts in writing the income "self-declaration" policy that food shelves have been aware of but never had to formally accept before. That policy allows people filling out eligibility forms to self-declare their income, address, whether they receive food stamps and other data, Sullivan Sutton said.

                        "Self-declaration has been consistent across the country for a number of years," she said.

                        Sorting out basic needs

                        Koop said her 40-year-old agency, which also provides clothes, furniture and other services, enjoys strong church and community support. She said the service has two social workers who sit down with repeat visitors and "get to the root cause of why they come." They sort out basic needs, which don't include expenses like cable television, she said.

                        "If we are not able to verify their income and expenses, we would be enabling them again," Koop said. "We are not about entitlement but about partnering and helping families make good choices so they can get on their feet."

                        Byron Laher, president of the Community Emergency Assistance Program serving Anoka County and part of Hennepin County, said he hasn't seen the new agreement yet. But he doesn't think it would affect their food shelf because it only uses client-reported income and expense data to help people better allocate their incomes.

                        Tonya, 42, who asked that her last name not be used, stopped Tuesday for Thanksgiving food at the Neighbors store in South St. Paul. The single mother, who has three children at home, said she's been out of work about two years. Her refrigerator died in the past week, spoiling most of her food, except the turkey.

                        "I called Neighbors and they said 'Come on in,'" Tonya said. "Thank God for Neighbors."

                        Asked about the new agreement forbidding food shelves from verifying income data, Tonya said they should be able to require such information to prevent "somebody shady from trying to get free food when they don't really need it." She added:

                        "The people that need the help should get it."

                        Jim Adams • 952-707-9996

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