Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

State receives up to $35 million federal grant to increase health care access

Expand Messages
  • Craig Brooks
    FYI -- some may want to ask why only 24 of 87 Counties are covered and why so much of southern MN is left out. Craig Brooks   Grant helps DHS and community
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment

      FYI -- some may want to ask why only 24 of 87 Counties are covered and why so much of southern MN is left out.

      Craig Brooks

       

      Grant helps DHS and community agencies expand health care access

      DHS will receive up to $35.3 million in federal grant funding over five years to help uninsured Minnesotans receive health care through local access to care programs. The money will be used to make grants to community agencies for programs providing affordable coverage for preventive health care services to people who are not eligible for public programs and unable to afford private insurance. In addition to grant money, DHS will provide tools and assistance to community agencies to enroll eligible people in the local access to care programs or state health care programs. More information about the federal grant is in a news release.

       

       

      ***News release******
      State receives up to $35 million federal grant to increase health care access

      The Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) has been awarded almost $35.3 million over five years to help uninsured Minnesotans receive health care through local access to care programs. The money will be used to make grants to community agencies for programs providing affordable coverage for preventive health care services to people who are not eligible for public programs and unable to afford private insurance.

      Minnesota was one of 13 states to receive funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The first-year grant is $4.6 million and the state will need to re-apply for funding each year to access the full $35 million. An additional $30 million from non-federal sources will be contributed to the total project funding primarily from in-kind services from community agencies and DHS.

      “Partnerships between state, local, and private entities are important in providing health care for the uninsured,” said Minnesota Human Services Commissioner Cal Ludeman. “These grants will help community health organizations provide preventative care.”

      Initially three community agencies will receive funding to expand local access to care programs, also known as multi-share models, with funding provided by a combination of community sources, employers and enrollees:

      • Portico Healthnet, which serves low-income uninsured individuals and families in Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey and Washington counties

      • HealthShare of Duluth, which will expand its multi-share program to include people in St. Louis, Carlton, Cook, Lake, Itasca, Koochiching and Aitkin counties

      • PrimeWest Health that will create a program to serve Beltrami, Big Stone, Clearwater, Douglas, Grant, Hubbard, McLeod, Meeker, Pipestone, Pope, Renville, Stevens and Traverse counties.

      Up to 10,000 uninsured Minnesotans are estimated to receive coverage through the programs, which are expected to be open to people with incomes ranging from about $37,900 for a single person to $77,175 for a family of four. DHS will provide tools and assistance to community agencies to enroll people who are eligible in the local access to care programs or state health care programs. DHS will also expand the multi-share models statewide through grants and create a supportive infrastructure for the programs. The programs will be evaluated by the State Health Access Data Assistance Center at the University of Minnesota Division of Health Policy and Management in the School of Public Health.


       

    • Green, Deacon Justin
      So, this is a regrant by the state of federal funds. Was there a competition for these funds? Was it announced? Did anyone in SE Minnesota apply? Justin
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 1, 2009
      • 0 Attachment

        So, this is a regrant by the state of federal funds.  Was there a competition for these funds?  Was it announced?  Did anyone in SE Minnesota apply?

         

        Justin

         

        From: PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PovertyRndTable@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Craig Brooks
        Sent: Thursday, October 01, 2009 3:23 PM
        To: Poverty Roundtable
        Cc: Rep. Gene Pelowski; Sharon Ropes; rep.steve.drazkowski@...
        Subject: [PovertyRndTable] State receives up to $35 million federal grant to increase health care access

         

         

        FYI -- some may want to ask why only 24 of 87 Counties are covered and why so much of southern MN is left out.

        Craig Brooks

         

        Grant helps DHS and community agencies expand health care access

        DHS will receive up to $35.3 million in federal grant funding over five years to help uninsured Minnesotans receive health care through local access to care programs. The money will be used to make grants to community agencies for programs providing affordable coverage for preventive health care services to people who are not eligible for public programs and unable to afford private insurance. In addition to grant money, DHS will provide tools and assistance to community agencies to enroll eligible people in the local access to care programs or state health care programs. More information about the federal grant is in a news release.

         

         

        ***News release******

        State receives up to $35 million federal grant to increase health care access

        The Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) has been awarded almost $35.3 million over five years to help uninsured Minnesotans receive health care through local access to care programs. The money will be used to make grants to community agencies for programs providing affordable coverage for preventive health care services to people who are not eligible for public programs and unable to afford private insurance.

        Minnesota was one of 13 states to receive funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The first-year grant is $4.6 million and the state will need to re-apply for funding each year to access the full $35 million. An additional $30 million from non-federal sources will be contributed to the total project funding primarily from in-kind services from community agencies and DHS.

         

        “Partnerships between state, local, and private entities are important in providing health care for the uninsured,” said Minnesota Human Services Commissioner Cal Ludeman. “These grants will help community health organizations provide preventative care.”

         

        Initially three community agencies will receive funding to expand local access to care programs, also known as multi-share models, with funding provided by a combination of community sources, employers and enrollees:

         

        • Portico Healthnet, which serves low-income uninsured individuals and families in Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey and Washington counties

         

        • HealthShare of Duluth, which will expand its multi-share program to include people in St. Louis, Carlton, Cook, Lake, Itasca, Koochiching and Aitkin counties

         

        • PrimeWest Health that will create a program to serve Beltrami, Big Stone, Clearwater, Douglas, Grant, Hubbard, McLeod, Meeker, Pipestone, Pope, Renville, Stevens and Traverse counties.

         

        Up to 10,000 uninsured Minnesotans are estimated to receive coverage through the programs, which are expected to be open to people with incomes ranging from about $37,900 for a single person to $77,175 for a family of four. DHS will provide tools and assistance to community agencies to enroll people who are eligible in the local access to care programs or state health care programs. DHS will also expand the multi-share models statewide through grants and create a supportive infrastructure for the programs. The programs will be evaluated by the State Health Access Data Assistance Center at the University of Minnesota Division of Health Policy and Management in the School of Public Health.



         

         

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.