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'Fats' Domino Missing in New Orleans

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  • Jose G. Figueroa
    Fats Domino Missing in New Orleans Katrina Benefits Should Acknowledge Local Legends Thursday, September 01, 2005 By Roger Friedman Before NBC, MTV or anyone
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1 12:56 PM
      'Fats' Domino Missing in New Orleans
      Katrina Benefits Should Acknowledge Local Legends

      Thursday, September 01, 2005

      By Roger Friedman

      Before NBC, MTV or anyone else puts on a telethon to
      help victims of Hurricane Katrina, they might want to
      explore some ancillary issues. To wit: New Orleans is
      a city famous for its famous musicians, but many of
      them are missing. Missing with a capital M.

      To begin with, one of the city’s most important
      legends, Antoine "Fats" Domino, has not been heard
      from since Monday afternoon. Domino’s rollicking
      boogie-woogie piano and deep soul voice are not only
      part of the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame but responsible
      for dozens of hits like “Blue Monday,” “Ain’t That a
      Shame,” “Blueberry Hill” and “I’m Walking (Yes,
      Indeed, I’m Talking).”

      Domino, 76, lives with his wife Rosemary and daughter
      in a three-story pink-roofed house in New Orleans’ 9th
      ward, which is now under water.

      On Monday afternoon, Domino told his manager, Al Embry
      of Nashville, that he would “ride out the storm” at
      home. Embry is now frantic.

      Calls have been made to Louisiana Gov. Kathleen
      Blanco’s office and to various police officials, and
      though there’s lots of sympathetic response, the
      whereabouts of Domino and his family remain a mystery.

      In the meantime, another important Louisiana musician
      who probably hasn’t been asked to be in any telethons
      is the also legendary Allen Toussaint.

      Another Rock Hall member, Toussaint wrote Patti
      LaBelle’s hit “Lady Marmalade” and Dr. John’s “Right
      Place, Wrong Time.”

      His arrangements and orchestrations for hundreds of
      hit records, including his own instrumentals “Whipped
      Cream” and “Java” are American staples. (He also
      arranged Paul Simon’s hit, “Kodachrome.”)

      Last night, Toussaint was one of the 25,000 people
      holed up at the New Orleans Superdome hoping to get on
      a bus for Houston’s Astrodome. I know this because he
      got a message out to his daughter, who relayed to it
      through friends.

      Also not heard from by friends through last night: New
      Orleans’s “Queen of Soul” Irma Thomas, who was the
      original singer of what became the Rolling Stones’
      hit, “Time is On My Side.”

      Let’s hope and pray it is, because while the Stones
      roll through the U.S. on their $450-a-ticket tour,
      Thomas is missing in action. Her club, The Lion’s Den,
      is under water, as are all the famous music hot spots
      of the city.

      Similarly, friends are looking for Antoinette K-Doe,
      widow of New Orleans wild performer Ernie K-Doe. The
      Does have a famous nightspot of their own on N.
      Claiborne Avenue, called the Mother-in-Law Lounge, in
      honor of Ernie’s immortal hit, “The Mother-in-Law
      Song.”

      Ernie K-Doe, who received a 1998 Pioneer Award from
      the Rhythm and Blues Foundation, died in 2001 at age
      65.

      Dry and safe, but in not much better shape, is the
      famous Neville family of New Orleans. Aaron Neville
      and many members of the family evacuated on Monday to
      Memphis, where they are now staying in a hotel.

      But most of the Nevilles’ homes are destroyed, reports
      their niece and my colleague at “A Current Affair,”
      Arthel Neville. She went down to her hometown
      yesterday and called me from a boat that was trying to
      get near town.

      “This isn’t like having two feet of water in your
      basement,” she said, holding back tears. “Everything
      is destroyed. I am just so lucky to have been born
      here and to have had the experience of New Orleans."

      She confirmed that there had been rumors of dead
      bodies floating around her Uncle Aaron’s house
      yesterday. So far, the Nevilles are unannounced to
      participate in Friday’s TV telethon.

      And still there are plenty of other famous musicians
      associated with New Orleans who would probably like to
      be on TV if they’re high and dry.

      The Marsalis family comes from the city, and they’ve
      played at most of the well known clubs like
      Tipitina’s, The Maple Leaf, Preservation Hall and
      Muddy Waters.

      New Orleans is also one of the few cities with a House
      of Blues. And Jimmy Buffet’s Margharitaville Café
      chain has a local franchise that is still an
      attraction.

      New Orleans’ trademark sounds are Cajun and Zydeco. So
      far none of the listed benefits have named an act that
      plays that kind of music.
    • Maureen Brunetti
      The news had footage of Fats being rescued today. Maureen ... From: Jose G. Figueroa To: Sent:
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1 8:27 PM
        The news had footage of "Fats" being rescued today.
        Maureen
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Jose G. Figueroa" <figmillenium@...>
        To: <potatochips@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Thursday, September 01, 2005 2:56 PM
        Subject: [PotatoChips] 'Fats' Domino Missing in New Orleans


        > 'Fats' Domino Missing in New Orleans
        > Katrina Benefits Should Acknowledge Local Legends
        >
        > Thursday, September 01, 2005
        >
        > By Roger Friedman
        >
        > Before NBC, MTV or anyone else puts on a telethon to
        > help victims of Hurricane Katrina, they might want to
        > explore some ancillary issues. To wit: New Orleans is
        > a city famous for its famous musicians, but many of
        > them are missing. Missing with a capital M.
        >
        > To begin with, one of the city's most important
        > legends, Antoine "Fats" Domino, has not been heard
        > from since Monday afternoon. Domino's rollicking
        > boogie-woogie piano and deep soul voice are not only
        > part of the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame but responsible
        > for dozens of hits like "Blue Monday," "Ain't That a
        > Shame," "Blueberry Hill" and "I'm Walking (Yes,
        > Indeed, I'm Talking)."
        >
        > Domino, 76, lives with his wife Rosemary and daughter
        > in a three-story pink-roofed house in New Orleans' 9th
        > ward, which is now under water.
        >
        > On Monday afternoon, Domino told his manager, Al Embry
        > of Nashville, that he would "ride out the storm" at
        > home. Embry is now frantic.
        >
        > Calls have been made to Louisiana Gov. Kathleen
        > Blanco's office and to various police officials, and
        > though there's lots of sympathetic response, the
        > whereabouts of Domino and his family remain a mystery.
        >
        > In the meantime, another important Louisiana musician
        > who probably hasn't been asked to be in any telethons
        > is the also legendary Allen Toussaint.
        >
        > Another Rock Hall member, Toussaint wrote Patti
        > LaBelle's hit "Lady Marmalade" and Dr. John's "Right
        > Place, Wrong Time."
        >
        > His arrangements and orchestrations for hundreds of
        > hit records, including his own instrumentals "Whipped
        > Cream" and "Java" are American staples. (He also
        > arranged Paul Simon's hit, "Kodachrome.")
        >
        > Last night, Toussaint was one of the 25,000 people
        > holed up at the New Orleans Superdome hoping to get on
        > a bus for Houston's Astrodome. I know this because he
        > got a message out to his daughter, who relayed to it
        > through friends.
        >
        > Also not heard from by friends through last night: New
        > Orleans's "Queen of Soul" Irma Thomas, who was the
        > original singer of what became the Rolling Stones'
        > hit, "Time is On My Side."
        >
        > Let's hope and pray it is, because while the Stones
        > roll through the U.S. on their $450-a-ticket tour,
        > Thomas is missing in action. Her club, The Lion's Den,
        > is under water, as are all the famous music hot spots
        > of the city.
        >
        > Similarly, friends are looking for Antoinette K-Doe,
        > widow of New Orleans wild performer Ernie K-Doe. The
        > Does have a famous nightspot of their own on N.
        > Claiborne Avenue, called the Mother-in-Law Lounge, in
        > honor of Ernie's immortal hit, "The Mother-in-Law
        > Song."
        >
        > Ernie K-Doe, who received a 1998 Pioneer Award from
        > the Rhythm and Blues Foundation, died in 2001 at age
        > 65.
        >
        > Dry and safe, but in not much better shape, is the
        > famous Neville family of New Orleans. Aaron Neville
        > and many members of the family evacuated on Monday to
        > Memphis, where they are now staying in a hotel.
        >
        > But most of the Nevilles' homes are destroyed, reports
        > their niece and my colleague at "A Current Affair,"
        > Arthel Neville. She went down to her hometown
        > yesterday and called me from a boat that was trying to
        > get near town.
        >
        > "This isn't like having two feet of water in your
        > basement," she said, holding back tears. "Everything
        > is destroyed. I am just so lucky to have been born
        > here and to have had the experience of New Orleans."
        >
        > She confirmed that there had been rumors of dead
        > bodies floating around her Uncle Aaron's house
        > yesterday. So far, the Nevilles are unannounced to
        > participate in Friday's TV telethon.
        >
        > And still there are plenty of other famous musicians
        > associated with New Orleans who would probably like to
        > be on TV if they're high and dry.
        >
        > The Marsalis family comes from the city, and they've
        > played at most of the well known clubs like
        > Tipitina's, The Maple Leaf, Preservation Hall and
        > Muddy Waters.
        >
        > New Orleans is also one of the few cities with a House
        > of Blues. And Jimmy Buffet's Margharitaville Café
        > chain has a local franchise that is still an
        > attraction.
        >
        > New Orleans' trademark sounds are Cajun and Zydeco. So
        > far none of the listed benefits have named an act that
        > plays that kind of music.
        >
        >
        >
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