Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [PostCardMailArt] RE: Photographing our Postcards

Expand Messages
  • Sue Balchak
    Yes Nancie I m sure that is similar to what Maureen means. Mine seem to curve / bow out at the sides. I find that I get a better photo when I do not use my
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 3, 2013
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Yes Nancie I'm sure that is similar to what Maureen means.  Mine seem to curve / bow out at the sides.

      I find that I get a better photo when I do not use my flash, just natural light.  I'm fortunate to have large windows near my sewing table / ironing board.  I place my PCs on the ironing board and open my window blinds enough to get a nice bright natural light and put my camera on no flash, stand above the PC shooting down.  Then after I load to my computer I crop all around the PC the best that I can so that the curvature of the photo isn't as noticeable.

      Warm Quilt Hugs,  Sue in CA

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PostCardMailArt


      Subject: [PostCardMailArt] RE: Photographing our Postcards

       

      I often *think* I'm photographing a postcard straight on....and then when I snap the picture, the card appears narrower at one end than the other. Is this what you are referring to?
       
      I have a "point and shoot" camera so I'm no expert. I have to really focus on the lines of the postcard being parallel to the edges of my camera screen. I photograph most of my postcards on a design wall...I usually have to move the camera higher to get a straight shot, even when this feels abnormal.
       
      I've also found that I get better quality if I stand a good distance from the postcard (meaning the flash is at a distance too).  I use the zoom to enlarge the image to fill the frame.
       
      --Nancie V in Austin TX 


    • sheree_sews_fab
      Maureen - because you are using a point and shoot camera, the eye viewer is in a different location than the camera lens taking the picture. The closer you are
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 3, 2013
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment

        Maureen - because you are using a point and shoot camera, the eye viewer is in a different location than the camera lens taking the picture.  The closer you are to the subject the more drastic the warp and difference are, or the parallax.  So try moving the camera back about 3-5 feet away, but zoom in as much as you can.  


        Look at the front of your camera.  Is the eye viewer in upper right or upper left area of camera?  Where is the lens location?  Once you have this awareness try to sit your postcard in the opposite area of the view finder, example..... before snapping pic have the postcard in lower left area of your viewing screen.  You will have to play around with your actual camera, but do not necessarily center the postcard in your view finder.


        Hope this helps a bit-   Sheree

        Parallax

        In rangefinder cameras, the difference between the image seen by the lens and the viewfinder. The discrepancy increases as the subject moves closer to the camera. This does not occur in SLR cameras   



        --- In postcardmailart@yahoogroups.com, <wraez@...> wrote:

        Yes Nancie I'm sure that is similar to what Maureen means.  Mine seem to curve / bow out at the sides.

        I find that I get a better photo when I do not use my flash, just natural light.  I'm fortunate to have large windows near my sewing table / ironing board.  I place my PCs on the ironing board and open my window blinds enough to get a nice bright natural light and put my camera on no flash, stand above the PC shooting down.  Then after I load to my computer I crop all around the PC the best that I can so that the curvature of the photo isn't as noticeable.

        Warm Quilt Hugs,  Sue in CA

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/PostCardMailArt


        Subject: [PostCardMailArt] RE: Photographing our Postcards

         

        I often *think* I'm photographing a postcard straight on....and then when I snap the picture, the card appears narrower at one end than the other. Is this what you are referring to?
         
        I have a "point and shoot" camera so I'm no expert. I have to really focus on the lines of the postcard being parallel to the edges of my camera screen. I photograph most of my postcards on a design wall...I usually have to move the camera higher to get a straight shot, even when this feels abnormal.
         
        I've also found that I get better quality if I stand a good distance from the postcard (meaning the flash is at a distance too).  I use the zoom to enlarge the image to fill the frame.
         
        --Nancie V in Austin TX 


      • lynn j
        In my opinion,lol, if you hold the camera exactly straight and flat to the postcard it will come out the right way. I have the same problem because when I
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 5, 2013
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          In my opinion,lol, if you hold the camera exactly straight and flat to the postcard it will come out the right way.  I have the same problem because when I think it is straight and flat often times it isn’t.  Once in a while I will get it right.  I don’t know if a tripod type thing would work as I don’t know what there is available for photography.  Lynn in wa.
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.