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Re: PortaBote on Lake Michigan?

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  • susannekscott
    Hi Rick, Thanks for the recommendations! I definitely put those on my short list! Any preferred name brands? Best, Suzy
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 1, 2010
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      Hi Rick,

      Thanks for the recommendations! I definitely put those on my short list! Any preferred name brands?

      Best,

      Suzy

      --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <riversedge1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi, Another item to consider is safely dressing for the water temp just in case. Check with local kayakers/canoeists especially those fishing from kayaks. A drysuit, while pricey (may be available good used) would be an excellent investment and do not restrict mobility or lighter and cheaper waterproof dry pants and jackets, boots, gloves, all with fleece (not cotton) layers under. Also a rescue beacon just in case. Pricy stuff but long lasting and cheap compared to the cost of living. Happy Adventures, Rick
      >
      > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, susannekscott <no_reply@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Dear PortaBoters:
      > >
      > > Thanks for all the thoughts and advice! I am planning on going out on the Lake only when it's a calm day. I worry mostly about an unpredicted change in the wind/weather pattern.
      > >
      > > I agree with Curtis that it depends on how where you are located on the Lake. While the East (Michigan) compared to west side (Wisconsin) of the Lake receives the worst lake-effect weather (as in snow & storms), the West side of the Lake (Wisconsin - my side) is probably scary to be out on a small boat because the jet stream moves west to east -- a west wind occurs much more often and with greater intensity, on the whole. The waves move away from the shore and everything on the water travels away from shore! East winds can be strong too, but they occur with less frequency. NE, NNE, SE, SSE winds are even more common than direct East winds. While many Great Lake shorelines receive a bunch of lake effect snow, esp in early winter (IN, OH, MI, NY, etc...), Eastern Wisconsin is rarely included in those newsworthy events. Northern Wisconsin is a different story!!
      > >
      > > Door County is called "The Cape Cod" of the Midwest. It's gorgeous up there. Green Bay (western side of the thumb and more industrial) is no doubt much calmer. I'm in the Eastern-Central part of WI - I call it the last shoreline frontier (between Door County/Green Bay and Milwaukee). Very rural and undeveloped, for the most part. Some days, I'm amazed that cows are grazing right on prime waterfront real estate! Being originally from CA, it's an eye popper to see Ag land where multi-million dollar homes or condos would be on any other shoreline in the USA (including poor States like AL, MS, and LA & the Gulf shore). Lets keep this little secret to ourselves, OK? LOL! This little nugget of info will probably NOT dramatically change the migration pattern of WI.
      > >
      > > Herbert & Maurry, thanks for the important tips on accessories and paraphernalia. I have no idea what I definitely NEED (lifejacket, GPS, anchor, Katadyn water filter, and a way to call/Mayday the CG) and differentiating that from what I would WANT. I need to buy a Boating/Fishing for Dummies book. I agree with Herbert that if kayaks (even jet skies) can go out, then with some prudence, I think that a PortaBote should be able to have good experiences as well. Did you know that some guys even surf Lake Michigan? - search on Youtube and you'll be amazed at the surfers!!
      > >
      > > Thanks again for the help. You've raised my confidence level. It was shattered after listening to The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald! LOL!! I think maybe this Spring -- if all goes well...
      > >
      > > You folks are great - thanks!
      > >
      > > Suzy
      > >
      > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Curtis" <caf@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > If you use some care you should be OK. Will you be on the East, West, or North side of the lake? All areas of the lake will be dangerous at times, but where you are in the lake will determine how much of the time is dangerous. On the West side West of the Wisconsin thumb (Green Bay) is probably the calmest area of the lake. Generally the West side will have more usable days than the East side. North side is probably going to be between the West side and East side for usable days.
      > > >
      > > > You will need to check the weather forecast before going out.
      > > >
      > > > There will be days when the chop on the lake will be too much for the PB. Winds or storms can generate two to three foot chop with a very short distance between peaks. Trying to travel North or South in a good chop will be almost impossible. There are a large number of days when the lake is smooth, gently rolling, or foot or less waves.
      > > > There are days when there are white caps across the entire lake. When the wind is blowing, you better be going in it's direction or not have very far to go against the wind.
      > > >
      > > > I grew up in Door County, Wisconsin and loved watching all the boats.
      > > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Herbert J. Hedstrom" <hhedstrom@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > I personally would be reluctant to go out on Lake Michigan in a portabote,
      > > > > but I suspect it can be done with reasonable safety. People kayak on the
      > > > > lake all the time—but a kayak is harder to swamp than an open boat. If you
      > > > > do it, be very careful about weather, and make sure your motor is in good
      > > > > shape. Finally, consider a sea anchor (one of those underwater parachute
      > > > > things). It would keep you bow into the wind if your motor goes out.
      > > > > Wikipedia has a good article on the subject.
      > > > >
      > > > > The problem with the Great Lakes is that the waves are often steeper and
      > > > > closer together than is typical on the ocean—not friendly to a small boat.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Herbert J. Hedstrom
      > > > >
      > > > > hhedstrom@
      > > > >
      > > > > _____
      > > > >
      > > > > From: PortaBote@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PortaBote@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
      > > > > Of susannekscott
      > > > > Sent: Monday, November 29, 2010 7:39 PM
      > > > > To: PortaBote@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > Subject: Re: [California PortaBoters] PortaBote on Lake Michigan?
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Dear Maurry,
      > > > >
      > > > > Thanks so much for your thoughts on this. I agree that I'd need to watch the
      > > > > weather closely. I hope that the level of weather monitoring required won't
      > > > > detract from the fishing.
      > > > >
      > > > > Do you think a 5 or 6 HP engine can handle rip currents? Also, unlike the
      > > > > ocean, often the waves on the lake move away from shore (go backwards), esp
      > > > > when there is a good wind blowing.
      > > > >
      > > > > What would I do if the engine didn't start? Someone in this group mentioned
      > > > > the boat tipping over when he pulled something up on one side. The problem
      > > > > with the Great Lakes is that they are unforgiving if you fall over (even in
      > > > > summer!!). More than likely, there is going to be a hypothermic event. I did
      > > > > read here that several people use the Porta Bote in ocean bays. I'm not sure
      > > > > which is more treacherous - Great Lakes or ocean bays.
      > > > >
      > > > > By the way, does the Coast Guard treat the PortaBote like other legitimate
      > > > > watercraft?
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com <mailto:PortaBote%40yahoogroups.com> ,
      > > > > Maurry Tamarkin <mjtamarkin@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Dear Suzy,
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I think you can do it safely. But you have to promise not to go out more
      > > > > than
      > > > > > 1/2 mile, wear a life preserver, and monitor the weather closely, say
      > > > > every 15
      > > > > > minutes. If you are not too burdened in a 12 foot bote, you should be able
      > > > > to
      > > > > > return to shore in less than 10 minutes.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Good luck!
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Maurry
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > ________________________________
      > > > > > From: susannekscott <no_reply@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > <mailto:no_reply%40yahoogroups.com> >
      > > > > > To: PortaBote@yahoogroups.com <mailto:PortaBote%40yahoogroups.com>
      > > > > > Sent: Mon, November 29, 2010 8:00:58 PM
      > > > > > Subject: [California PortaBoters] PortaBote on Lake Michigan?
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Â
      > > > > > Hello PortaBote Group,
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I've been thinking about buying a PortaBote to fish off the shoreline of
      > > > > Lake
      > > > > > Michigan - no more than 1/4 to 1/2 mile out. This has been something I've
      > > > > been
      > > > > > thinking about for nearly 2 years.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Recently, in remembrance of the sinking of Edmund Fitzgerald, I listened
      > > > > to the
      > > > > > Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Gordon Lightfoot -> here:
      > > > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgI8bta-7aw or here with lyrics:
      > > > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvKGz4s3kuU
      > > > > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvKGz4s3kuU&feature=related>
      > > > > &feature=related
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Anyway, I shared the story of the EF to a dear friend of mine and
      > > > > mentioned to
      > > > > > her how it was one of the largest cargo ships ever to sail on the Great
      > > > > Lakes
      > > > > > and that it was sunk in that November storm. With all the sincerity in
      > > > > voice and
      > > > > > manner, she said to me "and you want to buy a boat that you can fold up
      > > > > and put
      > > > > > in your pocket?"
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > That got me thinking...do you think the PortaBote is a good idea on the
      > > > > Great
      > > > > > Lakes? The weather, wind, and waves do change quite dramatically from hour
      > > > > to
      > > > > > hour.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Any insight or informed opinion would be much appreciated!!
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Thanks so much!!
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Suzy
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • susannekscott
      Do they make a porta deck now? I asked about this last year when I saw dogs on the porta bote on the website. Someone said that you have to make your own? Is
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 1, 2010
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        Do they make a porta deck now? I asked about this last year when I saw dogs on the porta bote on the website. Someone said that you have to make your own? Is that true or can you now buy a porta deck as an accessory?

        Thanks for the head up on this!!

        Suzy

        --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, parmenides56 <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Another very important thing to consider -- get the Portadeck for your Portabote. It will allow you to easily and quickly (!) get back in if you ever fall out.
        >
        > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <riversedge1@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi, Another item to consider is safely dressing for the water temp just in case. Check with local kayakers/canoeists especially those fishing from kayaks. A drysuit, while pricey (may be available good used) would be an excellent investment and do not restrict mobility or lighter and cheaper waterproof dry pants and jackets, boots, gloves, all with fleece (not cotton) layers under. Also a rescue beacon just in case. Pricy stuff but long lasting and cheap compared to the cost of living. Happy Adventures, Rick
        > >
        > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, susannekscott <no_reply@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Dear PortaBoters:
        > > >
        > > > Thanks for all the thoughts and advice! I am planning on going out on the Lake only when it's a calm day. I worry mostly about an unpredicted change in the wind/weather pattern.
        > > >
        > > > I agree with Curtis that it depends on how where you are located on the Lake. While the East (Michigan) compared to west side (Wisconsin) of the Lake receives the worst lake-effect weather (as in snow & storms), the West side of the Lake (Wisconsin - my side) is probably scary to be out on a small boat because the jet stream moves west to east -- a west wind occurs much more often and with greater intensity, on the whole. The waves move away from the shore and everything on the water travels away from shore! East winds can be strong too, but they occur with less frequency. NE, NNE, SE, SSE winds are even more common than direct East winds. While many Great Lake shorelines receive a bunch of lake effect snow, esp in early winter (IN, OH, MI, NY, etc...), Eastern Wisconsin is rarely included in those newsworthy events. Northern Wisconsin is a different story!!
        > > >
        > > > Door County is called "The Cape Cod" of the Midwest. It's gorgeous up there. Green Bay (western side of the thumb and more industrial) is no doubt much calmer. I'm in the Eastern-Central part of WI - I call it the last shoreline frontier (between Door County/Green Bay and Milwaukee). Very rural and undeveloped, for the most part. Some days, I'm amazed that cows are grazing right on prime waterfront real estate! Being originally from CA, it's an eye popper to see Ag land where multi-million dollar homes or condos would be on any other shoreline in the USA (including poor States like AL, MS, and LA & the Gulf shore). Lets keep this little secret to ourselves, OK? LOL! This little nugget of info will probably NOT dramatically change the migration pattern of WI.
        > > >
        > > > Herbert & Maurry, thanks for the important tips on accessories and paraphernalia. I have no idea what I definitely NEED (lifejacket, GPS, anchor, Katadyn water filter, and a way to call/Mayday the CG) and differentiating that from what I would WANT. I need to buy a Boating/Fishing for Dummies book. I agree with Herbert that if kayaks (even jet skies) can go out, then with some prudence, I think that a PortaBote should be able to have good experiences as well. Did you know that some guys even surf Lake Michigan? - search on Youtube and you'll be amazed at the surfers!!
        > > >
        > > > Thanks again for the help. You've raised my confidence level. It was shattered after listening to The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald! LOL!! I think maybe this Spring -- if all goes well...
        > > >
        > > > You folks are great - thanks!
        > > >
        > > > Suzy
        > > >
        > > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Curtis" <caf@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > If you use some care you should be OK. Will you be on the East, West, or North side of the lake? All areas of the lake will be dangerous at times, but where you are in the lake will determine how much of the time is dangerous. On the West side West of the Wisconsin thumb (Green Bay) is probably the calmest area of the lake. Generally the West side will have more usable days than the East side. North side is probably going to be between the West side and East side for usable days.
        > > > >
        > > > > You will need to check the weather forecast before going out.
        > > > >
        > > > > There will be days when the chop on the lake will be too much for the PB. Winds or storms can generate two to three foot chop with a very short distance between peaks. Trying to travel North or South in a good chop will be almost impossible. There are a large number of days when the lake is smooth, gently rolling, or foot or less waves.
        > > > > There are days when there are white caps across the entire lake. When the wind is blowing, you better be going in it's direction or not have very far to go against the wind.
        > > > >
        > > > > I grew up in Door County, Wisconsin and loved watching all the boats.
        > > > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Herbert J. Hedstrom" <hhedstrom@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > I personally would be reluctant to go out on Lake Michigan in a portabote,
        > > > > > but I suspect it can be done with reasonable safety. People kayak on the
        > > > > > lake all the time—but a kayak is harder to swamp than an open boat. If you
        > > > > > do it, be very careful about weather, and make sure your motor is in good
        > > > > > shape. Finally, consider a sea anchor (one of those underwater parachute
        > > > > > things). It would keep you bow into the wind if your motor goes out.
        > > > > > Wikipedia has a good article on the subject.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > The problem with the Great Lakes is that the waves are often steeper and
        > > > > > closer together than is typical on the ocean—not friendly to a small boat.
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Herbert J. Hedstrom
        > > > > >
        > > > > > hhedstrom@
        > > > > >
        > > > > > _____
        > > > > >
        > > > > > From: PortaBote@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PortaBote@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        > > > > > Of susannekscott
        > > > > > Sent: Monday, November 29, 2010 7:39 PM
        > > > > > To: PortaBote@yahoogroups.com
        > > > > > Subject: Re: [California PortaBoters] PortaBote on Lake Michigan?
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Dear Maurry,
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Thanks so much for your thoughts on this. I agree that I'd need to watch the
        > > > > > weather closely. I hope that the level of weather monitoring required won't
        > > > > > detract from the fishing.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Do you think a 5 or 6 HP engine can handle rip currents? Also, unlike the
        > > > > > ocean, often the waves on the lake move away from shore (go backwards), esp
        > > > > > when there is a good wind blowing.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > What would I do if the engine didn't start? Someone in this group mentioned
        > > > > > the boat tipping over when he pulled something up on one side. The problem
        > > > > > with the Great Lakes is that they are unforgiving if you fall over (even in
        > > > > > summer!!). More than likely, there is going to be a hypothermic event. I did
        > > > > > read here that several people use the Porta Bote in ocean bays. I'm not sure
        > > > > > which is more treacherous - Great Lakes or ocean bays.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > By the way, does the Coast Guard treat the PortaBote like other legitimate
        > > > > > watercraft?
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com <mailto:PortaBote%40yahoogroups.com> ,
        > > > > > Maurry Tamarkin <mjtamarkin@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Dear Suzy,
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > I think you can do it safely. But you have to promise not to go out more
        > > > > > than
        > > > > > > 1/2 mile, wear a life preserver, and monitor the weather closely, say
        > > > > > every 15
        > > > > > > minutes. If you are not too burdened in a 12 foot bote, you should be able
        > > > > > to
        > > > > > > return to shore in less than 10 minutes.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Good luck!
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Maurry
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > ________________________________
        > > > > > > From: susannekscott <no_reply@yahoogroups.com
        > > > > > <mailto:no_reply%40yahoogroups.com> >
        > > > > > > To: PortaBote@yahoogroups.com <mailto:PortaBote%40yahoogroups.com>
        > > > > > > Sent: Mon, November 29, 2010 8:00:58 PM
        > > > > > > Subject: [California PortaBoters] PortaBote on Lake Michigan?
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Â
        > > > > > > Hello PortaBote Group,
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > I've been thinking about buying a PortaBote to fish off the shoreline of
        > > > > > Lake
        > > > > > > Michigan - no more than 1/4 to 1/2 mile out. This has been something I've
        > > > > > been
        > > > > > > thinking about for nearly 2 years.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Recently, in remembrance of the sinking of Edmund Fitzgerald, I listened
        > > > > > to the
        > > > > > > Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Gordon Lightfoot -> here:
        > > > > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgI8bta-7aw or here with lyrics:
        > > > > > > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvKGz4s3kuU
        > > > > > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvKGz4s3kuU&feature=related>
        > > > > > &feature=related
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Anyway, I shared the story of the EF to a dear friend of mine and
        > > > > > mentioned to
        > > > > > > her how it was one of the largest cargo ships ever to sail on the Great
        > > > > > Lakes
        > > > > > > and that it was sunk in that November storm. With all the sincerity in
        > > > > > voice and
        > > > > > > manner, she said to me "and you want to buy a boat that you can fold up
        > > > > > and put
        > > > > > > in your pocket?"
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > That got me thinking...do you think the PortaBote is a good idea on the
        > > > > > Great
        > > > > > > Lakes? The weather, wind, and waves do change quite dramatically from hour
        > > > > > to
        > > > > > > hour.
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Any insight or informed opinion would be much appreciated!!
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Thanks so much!!
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > Suzy
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Judith
        I agree that a drysuit, or at least a warm wetsuit depending on water temp, would be necessary. And no cotton--only quick-drying fleece or perhaps wool. Take
        Message 3 of 17 , Dec 1, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          I agree that a drysuit, or at least a warm wetsuit depending on water temp, would be necessary. And no cotton--only quick-drying fleece or perhaps wool. Take along a drybag attached to the boat with necessary things like a change of warm clothes.

          Places like REI.com, NRS.com, etc. have tutorials for kayakers that will cover this subject well. Check them out or google for articles with kayaking information. They should tell you what you will need for safety and to prevent hypothermia. They will discuss design features of drysuits and help you decide what you want to look for.

          Check out the usual water temps at the times of year you want to fish, and see what the articles say about drysuit vs. wetsuit, and clothing. You will probably never fall in, but just in case, it can be lifesaving to prepare for cold water.

          Judith

          --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, susannekscott <no_reply@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Rick,
          >
          > Thanks for the recommendations! I definitely put those on my short list! Any preferred name brands?
          >
          > Best,
          >
          > Suzy
          >
          > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <riversedge1@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi, Another item to consider is safely dressing for the water temp just in case. Check with local kayakers/canoeists especially those fishing from kayaks. A drysuit, while pricey (may be available good used) would be an excellent investment and do not restrict mobility or lighter and cheaper waterproof dry pants and jackets, boots, gloves, all with fleece (not cotton) layers under. Also a rescue beacon just in case. Pricy stuff but long lasting and cheap compared to the cost of living. Happy Adventures, Rick
        • susannekscott
          Hi Judith, Thanks so much for the website referrals! I truly appreciate the help and advice. Great people, great group! Best, Suzy
          Message 4 of 17 , Dec 2, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Hi Judith,

            Thanks so much for the website referrals! I truly appreciate the help and advice. Great people, great group!

            Best,

            Suzy

            --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Judith" <mtn.rambler@...> wrote:
            >
            > I agree that a drysuit, or at least a warm wetsuit depending on water temp, would be necessary. And no cotton--only quick-drying fleece or perhaps wool. Take along a drybag attached to the boat with necessary things like a change of warm clothes.
            >
            > Places like REI.com, NRS.com, etc. have tutorials for kayakers that will cover this subject well. Check them out or google for articles with kayaking information. They should tell you what you will need for safety and to prevent hypothermia. They will discuss design features of drysuits and help you decide what you want to look for.
            >
            > Check out the usual water temps at the times of year you want to fish, and see what the articles say about drysuit vs. wetsuit, and clothing. You will probably never fall in, but just in case, it can be lifesaving to prepare for cold water.
            >
            > Judith
            >
            > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, susannekscott <no_reply@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi Rick,
            > >
            > > Thanks for the recommendations! I definitely put those on my short list! Any preferred name brands?
            > >
            > > Best,
            > >
            > > Suzy
            > >
            > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <riversedge1@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Hi, Another item to consider is safely dressing for the water temp just in case. Check with local kayakers/canoeists especially those fishing from kayaks. A drysuit, while pricey (may be available good used) would be an excellent investment and do not restrict mobility or lighter and cheaper waterproof dry pants and jackets, boots, gloves, all with fleece (not cotton) layers under. Also a rescue beacon just in case. Pricy stuff but long lasting and cheap compared to the cost of living. Happy Adventures, Rick
            >
          • Richard
            I ve taken a 12 footer out on the west side of Lake Michigan (Grand Haven area) a number of time and always have a blast. I wouldn t worry about it, just use
            Message 5 of 17 , Dec 2, 2010
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              I've taken a 12 footer out on the west side of Lake Michigan (Grand Haven area) a number of time and always have a blast. I wouldn't worry about it, just use common sense and stay within the design specs of the boat.

              I go out during the summer when it is warm and calm, not during a storm when it is choppy. I stay within sight of land. Use the boat as it is designed to be used and in the conditions it is supposed to be used in. Just like the kayakers or wave-runner folks. Do that and you'll have some great memories.

              Richard

              --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, susannekscott <no_reply@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello PortaBote Group,
              >
              > I've been thinking about buying a PortaBote to fish off the shoreline of Lake Michigan - no more than 1/4 to 1/2 mile out. This has been something I've been thinking about for nearly 2 years.
              >
              > Recently, in remembrance of the sinking of Edmund Fitzgerald, I listened to the Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Gordon Lightfoot -> here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgI8bta-7aw or here with lyrics: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvKGz4s3kuU&feature=related
              >
              > Anyway, I shared the story of the EF to a dear friend of mine and mentioned to her how it was one of the largest cargo ships ever to sail on the Great Lakes and that it was sunk in that November storm. With all the sincerity in voice and manner, she said to me "and you want to buy a boat that you can fold up and put in your pocket?"
              >
              > That got me thinking...do you think the PortaBote is a good idea on the Great Lakes? The weather, wind, and waves do change quite dramatically from hour to hour.
              >
              > Any insight or informed opinion would be much appreciated!!
              >
              > Thanks so much!!
              >
              > Suzy
              >
            • susannekscott
              Hi Richard, That is truly confidence-inspiring!! I m sure that the Grand Haven area gets some weather!! Thanks for letting me know! Best, Suzy
              Message 6 of 17 , Dec 3, 2010
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                Hi Richard,

                That is truly confidence-inspiring!! I'm sure that the Grand Haven area gets some weather!! Thanks for letting me know!

                Best,

                Suzy

                --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Richard" <RSkyba@...> wrote:
                >
                > I've taken a 12 footer out on the west side of Lake Michigan (Grand Haven area) a number of time and always have a blast. I wouldn't worry about it, just use common sense and stay within the design specs of the boat.
                >
                > I go out during the summer when it is warm and calm, not during a storm when it is choppy. I stay within sight of land. Use the boat as it is designed to be used and in the conditions it is supposed to be used in. Just like the kayakers or wave-runner folks. Do that and you'll have some great memories.
                >
                > Richard
                >
                > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, susannekscott <no_reply@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Hello PortaBote Group,
                > >
                > > I've been thinking about buying a PortaBote to fish off the shoreline of Lake Michigan - no more than 1/4 to 1/2 mile out. This has been something I've been thinking about for nearly 2 years.
                > >
                > > Recently, in remembrance of the sinking of Edmund Fitzgerald, I listened to the Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald by Gordon Lightfoot -> here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgI8bta-7aw or here with lyrics: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvKGz4s3kuU&feature=related
                > >
                > > Anyway, I shared the story of the EF to a dear friend of mine and mentioned to her how it was one of the largest cargo ships ever to sail on the Great Lakes and that it was sunk in that November storm. With all the sincerity in voice and manner, she said to me "and you want to buy a boat that you can fold up and put in your pocket?"
                > >
                > > That got me thinking...do you think the PortaBote is a good idea on the Great Lakes? The weather, wind, and waves do change quite dramatically from hour to hour.
                > >
                > > Any insight or informed opinion would be much appreciated!!
                > >
                > > Thanks so much!!
                > >
                > > Suzy
                > >
                >
              • Rick
                Yes, REI and NRS good, especially their outlets & special sales, and I ve used Sierra Trading Post with good luck and big discounts (~70% if you re not color
                Message 7 of 17 , Dec 3, 2010
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                  Yes, REI and NRS good, especially their outlets & special sales, and I've used Sierra Trading Post with good luck and big discounts (~70% if you're not color choosy and they have your size) on Extrasport dry tops with double waist skirts to overlap with dry pants and stay pretty dry (not overboard dry for an extended periods though). Good to read the reviews on their items. If you get on their email list you get some good special cupons/deals occasionally but have to put up with a few emails a week :-). I find my Portabote 12' pretty flexibly stable so probably won't capsize too easily if you stay low and trimmed, but wind and chop could make for a very wet ride. Dont forget the bailer. Tight lines! Rick


                  --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, susannekscott <no_reply@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Judith,
                  >
                  > Thanks so much for the website referrals! I truly appreciate the help and advice. Great people, great group!
                  >
                  > Best,
                  >
                  > Suzy
                  >
                  > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Judith" <mtn.rambler@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > I agree that a drysuit, or at least a warm wetsuit depending on water temp, would be necessary. And no cotton--only quick-drying fleece or perhaps wool. Take along a drybag attached to the boat with necessary things like a change of warm clothes.
                  > >
                  > > Places like REI.com, NRS.com, etc. have tutorials for kayakers that will cover this subject well. Check them out or google for articles with kayaking information. They should tell you what you will need for safety and to prevent hypothermia. They will discuss design features of drysuits and help you decide what you want to look for.
                  > >
                  > > Check out the usual water temps at the times of year you want to fish, and see what the articles say about drysuit vs. wetsuit, and clothing. You will probably never fall in, but just in case, it can be lifesaving to prepare for cold water.
                  > >
                  > > Judith
                  > >
                  > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, susannekscott <no_reply@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Hi Rick,
                  > > >
                  > > > Thanks for the recommendations! I definitely put those on my short list! Any preferred name brands?
                  > > >
                  > > > Best,
                  > > >
                  > > > Suzy
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <riversedge1@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Hi, Another item to consider is safely dressing for the water temp just in case. Check with local kayakers/canoeists especially those fishing from kayaks. A drysuit, while pricey (may be available good used) would be an excellent investment and do not restrict mobility or lighter and cheaper waterproof dry pants and jackets, boots, gloves, all with fleece (not cotton) layers under. Also a rescue beacon just in case. Pricy stuff but long lasting and cheap compared to the cost of living. Happy Adventures, Rick
                  > >
                  >
                • susannekscott
                  Thanks so much Rick!!
                  Message 8 of 17 , Dec 6, 2010
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                    Thanks so much Rick!!

                    --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <riversedge1@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Yes, REI and NRS good, especially their outlets & special sales, and I've used Sierra Trading Post with good luck and big discounts (~70% if you're not color choosy and they have your size) on Extrasport dry tops with double waist skirts to overlap with dry pants and stay pretty dry (not overboard dry for an extended periods though). Good to read the reviews on their items. If you get on their email list you get some good special cupons/deals occasionally but have to put up with a few emails a week :-). I find my Portabote 12' pretty flexibly stable so probably won't capsize too easily if you stay low and trimmed, but wind and chop could make for a very wet ride. Dont forget the bailer. Tight lines! Rick
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, susannekscott <no_reply@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Hi Judith,
                    > >
                    > > Thanks so much for the website referrals! I truly appreciate the help and advice. Great people, great group!
                    > >
                    > > Best,
                    > >
                    > > Suzy
                    > >
                    > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Judith" <mtn.rambler@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > I agree that a drysuit, or at least a warm wetsuit depending on water temp, would be necessary. And no cotton--only quick-drying fleece or perhaps wool. Take along a drybag attached to the boat with necessary things like a change of warm clothes.
                    > > >
                    > > > Places like REI.com, NRS.com, etc. have tutorials for kayakers that will cover this subject well. Check them out or google for articles with kayaking information. They should tell you what you will need for safety and to prevent hypothermia. They will discuss design features of drysuits and help you decide what you want to look for.
                    > > >
                    > > > Check out the usual water temps at the times of year you want to fish, and see what the articles say about drysuit vs. wetsuit, and clothing. You will probably never fall in, but just in case, it can be lifesaving to prepare for cold water.
                    > > >
                    > > > Judith
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, susannekscott <no_reply@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Hi Rick,
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Thanks for the recommendations! I definitely put those on my short list! Any preferred name brands?
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Best,
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Suzy
                    > > > >
                    > > > > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rick" <riversedge1@> wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > Hi, Another item to consider is safely dressing for the water temp just in case. Check with local kayakers/canoeists especially those fishing from kayaks. A drysuit, while pricey (may be available good used) would be an excellent investment and do not restrict mobility or lighter and cheaper waterproof dry pants and jackets, boots, gloves, all with fleece (not cotton) layers under. Also a rescue beacon just in case. Pricy stuff but long lasting and cheap compared to the cost of living. Happy Adventures, Rick
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
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