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4-Cycle Motor Stand, 10' Boat performance with 4HP Yamaha, Spring Action Dolly

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  • Rich
    Several weeks ago, there was a discussion on the transportation of a 4-stroke motor. I really did not like the idea of laying it on its side, so I constructed
    Message 1 of 5 , May 2, 2007
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      Several weeks ago, there was a discussion on the transportation of a
      4-stroke motor. I really did not like the idea of laying it on its
      side, so I constructed a stand to hold the motor on a 45-degree
      angle. A safety strap secures the motor to the car so that in the
      event of one stopping quickly, it will help to prevent the motor from
      moving forward. I would not recommend using such a stand unless your
      vehicle is equipped with the means to properly secure it. A picture
      of the stand, along with other pictures has been posted.

      Gadaboat: you are a genius! I constructed your Spring-Action
      Modification to the Porta-Bote Dolly, and it works great. One can
      actually put the Dolly's onto the boat while it is in the water!
      However, one would not want to do this without Fold_n_fish's Tether!

      I weigh 240 pounds and have a 4-stroke, 4HP Yamaha outboard for my 10-
      foot Porta-Bote. On Niantic Bay, CT, with 400 ponds in the boat, and
      into a 6 MPH head wind, I got it up on plane by leaning forward at
      full throttle until the nose pushed down. Then I leaned back on my
      Sitbacker seat (another group recommendation), backed off to
      approximately 3/4 throttle, and the boat glided effortlessly through
      the water at approximately 14 MPH! Note: downwind, I only needed 1/2
      throttle to maintain plane. Windspeed and boat speed was calculated
      with a Kestrel anemometer, albeit GPS would have been better.

      Sandy: Thank you for making such a high quality product! It really
      is well-suited for quiet ocean bays, lakes and slow-moving rivers.
      The Porta-Bote is only 10 feet long, but it "feels" so much bigger
      and safer -- no doubt due to its wide beam, its two-foot depth, and
      the suppleness of its hull. Also, the Porta-Dolly is a great
      convenience! The boat is very easy to roll, loaded with motor and
      gear, across a hard surface so long as one does not exceed the weight
      limit as stated in your instructions. You should have seen the look
      on the face of a bystander as I pulled the boat right up boat launch
      ramp with ease!

      So thanks to all, and I hope you enjoy the pictures I posted.

      Rich
    • brownegg2
      Rich, Thanks for showing you mods and the pictures. Great job! Susan
      Message 2 of 5 , May 3, 2007
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        Rich,

        Thanks for showing you mods and the pictures. Great job!

        Susan

        --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <eahilt@...> wrote:
        >
        > Several weeks ago, there was a discussion on the transportation of a
        > 4-stroke motor. I really did not like the idea of laying it on its
        > side, so I constructed a stand to hold the motor on a 45-degree
        > angle. A safety strap secures the motor to the car so that in the
        > event of one stopping quickly, it will help to prevent the motor from
        > moving forward. I would not recommend using such a stand unless your
        > vehicle is equipped with the means to properly secure it. A picture
        > of the stand, along with other pictures has been posted.
        >
        > Gadaboat: you are a genius! I constructed your Spring-Action
        > Modification to the Porta-Bote Dolly, and it works great. One can
        > actually put the Dolly's onto the boat while it is in the water!
        > However, one would not want to do this without Fold_n_fish's Tether!
        >
        > I weigh 240 pounds and have a 4-stroke, 4HP Yamaha outboard for my 10-
        > foot Porta-Bote. On Niantic Bay, CT, with 400 ponds in the boat, and
        > into a 6 MPH head wind, I got it up on plane by leaning forward at
        > full throttle until the nose pushed down. Then I leaned back on my
        > Sitbacker seat (another group recommendation), backed off to
        > approximately 3/4 throttle, and the boat glided effortlessly through
        > the water at approximately 14 MPH! Note: downwind, I only needed 1/2
        > throttle to maintain plane. Windspeed and boat speed was calculated
        > with a Kestrel anemometer, albeit GPS would have been better.
        >
        > Sandy: Thank you for making such a high quality product! It really
        > is well-suited for quiet ocean bays, lakes and slow-moving rivers.
        > The Porta-Bote is only 10 feet long, but it "feels" so much bigger
        > and safer -- no doubt due to its wide beam, its two-foot depth, and
        > the suppleness of its hull. Also, the Porta-Dolly is a great
        > convenience! The boat is very easy to roll, loaded with motor and
        > gear, across a hard surface so long as one does not exceed the weight
        > limit as stated in your instructions. You should have seen the look
        > on the face of a bystander as I pulled the boat right up boat launch
        > ramp with ease!
        >
        > So thanks to all, and I hope you enjoy the pictures I posted.
        >
        > Rich
        >
      • ronaldwf2000
        Rich, Nice idea but I think it might be overkill. I have a 5 hp Nissan 4-stroke and I have been carrying it on its side for years (tiller side down) with no
        Message 3 of 5 , May 3, 2007
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          Rich,
          Nice idea but I think it might be overkill. I have a 5 hp Nissan
          4-stroke and I have been carrying it on its side for years (tiller
          side down) with no problems. One time I did make the mistake of
          laying it down on the other side, and that did create problems - hard
          to start and lots of smoke!
          IMHO the most important thing in transporting an outboard in a vehicle
          (beside having the tiler side down)is to consume all of the fuel in
          the hose and carburetor before transporting it.

          --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "brownegg2" <stiller@...> wrote:
          >
          > Rich,
          >
          > Thanks for showing you mods and the pictures. Great job!
          >
          > Susan
          >
          > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <eahilt@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Several weeks ago, there was a discussion on the transportation of a
          > > 4-stroke motor. I really did not like the idea of laying it on its
          > > side, so I constructed a stand to hold the motor on a 45-degree
          > > angle. A safety strap secures the motor to the car so that in the
          > > event of one stopping quickly, it will help to prevent the motor from
          > > moving forward. I would not recommend using such a stand unless your
          > > vehicle is equipped with the means to properly secure it. A picture
          > > of the stand, along with other pictures has been posted.
          > >
          > > Gadaboat: you are a genius! I constructed your Spring-Action
          > > Modification to the Porta-Bote Dolly, and it works great. One can
          > > actually put the Dolly's onto the boat while it is in the water!
          > > However, one would not want to do this without Fold_n_fish's Tether!
          > >
          > > I weigh 240 pounds and have a 4-stroke, 4HP Yamaha outboard for my 10-
          > > foot Porta-Bote. On Niantic Bay, CT, with 400 ponds in the boat, and
          > > into a 6 MPH head wind, I got it up on plane by leaning forward at
          > > full throttle until the nose pushed down. Then I leaned back on my
          > > Sitbacker seat (another group recommendation), backed off to
          > > approximately 3/4 throttle, and the boat glided effortlessly through
          > > the water at approximately 14 MPH! Note: downwind, I only needed 1/2
          > > throttle to maintain plane. Windspeed and boat speed was calculated
          > > with a Kestrel anemometer, albeit GPS would have been better.
          > >
          > > Sandy: Thank you for making such a high quality product! It really
          > > is well-suited for quiet ocean bays, lakes and slow-moving rivers.
          > > The Porta-Bote is only 10 feet long, but it "feels" so much bigger
          > > and safer -- no doubt due to its wide beam, its two-foot depth, and
          > > the suppleness of its hull. Also, the Porta-Dolly is a great
          > > convenience! The boat is very easy to roll, loaded with motor and
          > > gear, across a hard surface so long as one does not exceed the weight
          > > limit as stated in your instructions. You should have seen the look
          > > on the face of a bystander as I pulled the boat right up boat launch
          > > ramp with ease!
          > >
          > > So thanks to all, and I hope you enjoy the pictures I posted.
          > >
          > > Rich
          > >
          >
        • Richard Hiltgen
          Thanks Ronald, Ironically, my car is so narrow that the only way to fit the motor between the sides of the vehicle is to place it on a 45-degree angle. It s
          Message 4 of 5 , May 3, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks Ronald,

            Ironically, my car is so narrow that the only way to fit the motor between the sides of the vehicle is to place it on a 45-degree angle. It's nice to know that one doesn't have to worry about laying it on its side.

            I do run the carb out of gas before transporting it, but do not do this for the hose. When finished for the day, I place the tank and hose in a plastic bag to prevent the gasoline fumes from entering the vehicle. How do you remove the gas from the hose? Your adivce would be appreciated, because you're right that it is not a safe situation.

            Thanks

            Rich


            ronaldwf2000 <ronaldwf2000@...> wrote:

            Rich,
            Nice idea but I think it might be overkill. I have a 5 hp Nissan
            4-stroke and I have been carrying it on its side for years (tiller
            side down) with no problems. One time I did make the mistake of
            laying it down on the other side, and that did create problems - hard
            to start and lots of smoke!
            IMHO the most important thing in transporting an outboard in a vehicle
            (beside having the tiler side down)is to consume all of the fuel in
            the hose and carburetor before transporting it.

            --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "brownegg2" <stiller@...> wrote:
            >
            > Rich,
            >
            > Thanks for showing you mods and the pictures. Great job!
            >
            > Susan
            >
            > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <eahilt@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Several weeks ago, there was a discussion on the transportation of a
            > > 4-stroke motor. I really did not like the idea of laying it on its
            > > side, so I constructed a stand to hold the motor on a 45-degree
            > > angle. A safety strap secures the motor to the car so that in the
            > > event of one stopping quickly, it will help to prevent the motor from
            > > moving forward. I would not recommend using such a stand unless your
            > > vehicle is equipped with the means to properly secure it. A picture
            > > of the stand, along with other pictures has been posted.
            > >
            > > Gadaboat: you are a genius! I constructed your Spring-Action
            > > Modification to the Porta-Bote Dolly, and it works great. One can
            > > actually put the Dolly's onto the boat while it is in the water!
            > > However, one would not want to do this without Fold_n_fish's Tether!
            > >
            > > I weigh 240 pounds and have a 4-stroke, 4HP Yamaha outboard for my 10-
            > > foot Porta-Bote. On Niantic Bay, CT, with 400 ponds in the boat, and
            > > into a 6 MPH head wind, I got it up on plane by leaning forward at
            > > full throttle until the nose pushed down. Then I leaned back on my
            > > Sitbacker seat (another group recommendation), backed off to
            > > approximately 3/4 throttle, and the boat glided effortlessly through
            > > the water at approximately 14 MPH! Note: downwind, I only needed 1/2
            > > throttle to maintain plane. Windspeed and boat speed was calculated
            > > with a Kestrel anemometer, albeit GPS would have been better.
            > >
            > > Sandy: Thank you for making such a high quality product! It really
            > > is well-suited for quiet ocean bays, lakes and slow-moving rivers.
            > > The Porta-Bote is only 10 feet long, but it "feels" so much bigger
            > > and safer -- no doubt due to its wide beam, its two-foot depth, and
            > > the suppleness of its hull. Also, the Porta-Dolly is a great
            > > convenience! The boat is very easy to roll, loaded with motor and
            > > gear, across a hard surface so long as one does not exceed the weight
            > > limit as stated in your instructions. You should have seen the look
            > > on the face of a bystander as I pulled the boat right up boat launch
            > > ramp with ease!
            > >
            > > So thanks to all, and I hope you enjoy the pictures I posted.
            > >
            > > Rich
            > >
            >






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • ronald fuest
            Rich, I run the gas out of the hose by disconnecting it fron the gas tank and holding it somewhat higher than the motor. Admittedly, this is tedious because
            Message 5 of 5 , May 3, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Rich,

              I run the gas out of the hose by disconnecting it fron the gas tank and holding it somewhat higher than the motor. Admittedly, this is tedious because is is a long while before the hose becomes empty. It works if you are coming into a familiar launch site and can make the disconnect in a known time before you reach the end. Your solution, using a plastic bag to store the hose, is probably more practical for most situations. I find that the seal on the tank is adequate to prevent any escape of fumes.

              Ron

              Richard Hiltgen <eahilt@...> wrote: Thanks Ronald,

              Ironically, my car is so narrow that the only way to fit the motor between the sides of the vehicle is to place it on a 45-degree angle. It's nice to know that one doesn't have to worry about laying it on its side.

              I do run the carb out of gas before transporting it, but do not do this for the hose. When finished for the day, I place the tank and hose in a plastic bag to prevent the gasoline fumes from entering the vehicle. How do you remove the gas from the hose? Your adivce would be appreciated, because you're right that it is not a safe situation.

              Thanks

              Rich


              ronaldwf2000 <ronaldwf2000@...> wrote:

              Rich,
              Nice idea but I think it might be overkill. I have a 5 hp Nissan
              4-stroke and I have been carrying it on its side for years (tiller
              side down) with no problems. One time I did make the mistake of
              laying it down on the other side, and that did create problems - hard
              to start and lots of smoke!
              IMHO the most important thing in transporting an outboard in a vehicle
              (beside having the tiler side down)is to consume all of the fuel in
              the hose and carburetor before transporting it.

              --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "brownegg2" <stiller@...> wrote:
              >
              > Rich,
              >
              > Thanks for showing you mods and the pictures. Great job!
              >
              > Susan
              >
              > --- In PortaBote@yahoogroups.com, "Rich" <eahilt@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Several weeks ago, there was a discussion on the transportation of a
              > > 4-stroke motor. I really did not like the idea of laying it on its
              > > side, so I constructed a stand to hold the motor on a 45-degree
              > > angle. A safety strap secures the motor to the car so that in the
              > > event of one stopping quickly, it will help to prevent the motor from
              > > moving forward. I would not recommend using such a stand unless your
              > > vehicle is equipped with the means to properly secure it. A picture
              > > of the stand, along with other pictures has been posted.
              > >
              > > Gadaboat: you are a genius! I constructed your Spring-Action
              > > Modification to the Porta-Bote Dolly, and it works great. One can
              > > actually put the Dolly's onto the boat while it is in the water!
              > > However, one would not want to do this without Fold_n_fish's Tether!
              > >
              > > I weigh 240 pounds and have a 4-stroke, 4HP Yamaha outboard for my 10-
              > > foot Porta-Bote. On Niantic Bay, CT, with 400 ponds in the boat, and
              > > into a 6 MPH head wind, I got it up on plane by leaning forward at
              > > full throttle until the nose pushed down. Then I leaned back on my
              > > Sitbacker seat (another group recommendation), backed off to
              > > approximately 3/4 throttle, and the boat glided effortlessly through
              > > the water at approximately 14 MPH! Note: downwind, I only needed 1/2
              > > throttle to maintain plane. Windspeed and boat speed was calculated
              > > with a Kestrel anemometer, albeit GPS would have been better.
              > >
              > > Sandy: Thank you for making such a high quality product! It really
              > > is well-suited for quiet ocean bays, lakes and slow-moving rivers.
              > > The Porta-Bote is only 10 feet long, but it "feels" so much bigger
              > > and safer -- no doubt due to its wide beam, its two-foot depth, and
              > > the suppleness of its hull. Also, the Porta-Dolly is a great
              > > convenience! The boat is very easy to roll, loaded with motor and
              > > gear, across a hard surface so long as one does not exceed the weight
              > > limit as stated in your instructions. You should have seen the look
              > > on the face of a bystander as I pulled the boat right up boat launch
              > > ramp with ease!
              > >
              > > So thanks to all, and I hope you enjoy the pictures I posted.
              > >
              > > Rich
              > >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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