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Young Adult / Adult -- The New Faithful

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  • mwittlans@aol.com
    Check to see if this title is already in your library s catalog. If it is, put a hold on it and check it out. If not, fill out a patron request form right
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 17, 2005
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      Check to see if this title is already in your library's catalog. If it is,
      put a hold on it and check it out. If not, fill out a patron request form right
      away. This can usually be done online at your library's website.

      Title: The New Faithful: Why Young Adults Are Embracing Christian Orthodoxy
      Author: Colleen Carroll (Campbell)
      Publisher: Loyola Press
      Date Published: April 2004
      ISBN: 0829420428
      Price: 19.95 hardcover
      Comments: St. Louis Post-Dispatch journalist and OSV columnist Carroll
      traveled the country to interview young adults to ascertain how religion fits into
      their lives.



      Editorial Reviews

      From Publishers Weekly
      Carroll's title promises to answer a question that is not new; the decline of
      liberal Christianity and the rise of the evangelical movement has been a
      source of scholarly and journalistic fascination for more than 20 years. Carroll,
      though, gives an up-to-the-minute account of this phenomenon. She spent a year
      beginning in 2001 and ending in 2002 conducting research and interviews
      around the U.S., and, unlike most treatments of the new American passion for
      orthodoxy, hers focuses on the Catholic and Orthodox Churches as well as evangelical
      Protestantism. This emphasis on orthodoxy and ancient, liturgical tradition
      among young members is both novel and timely. While evangelical Protestant
      mega-churches were the big story 15 years ago, record-breaking conversion rates in
      conservative Catholic and Orthodox churches are today's headline. Carroll
      quotes many young people who yearn for both conservative interpretations of the
      Bible and the mystery and symbolism of liturgy. Especially popular among young
      orthodox Catholics is the pre-Vatican II practice of Eucharistic adoration,
      which involves reverencing a consecrated communion wafer. In her introduction,
      Carroll makes brief mention of her identification with the young, conservative
      Catholics she features, and this identification shows in analysis that often
      bleeds into advocacy. She does occasionally quote critics of the trend toward
      orthodoxy, but she never fully explores these dimensions. However, this is a
      book that generously and comprehensively examines a group that is often
      misunderstood and caricatured.
      Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the
      Hardcover edition.

      From Library Journal
      With the help of a Phillips Journalism Fellowship, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
      journalist Carroll traveled the country to interview young adults to ascertain
      how religion fits into their lives. Most of her interviewees were Catholics or
      evangelical Protestants, along with some Orthodox Christians. Carroll found a
      turn to the Right in the religious lives of her peers, born between 1965 and
      1983; not everyone in this age group is religiously oriented, but those who are
      have more often than not turned to traditional beliefs and morality. Among
      Catholic priests, for example, the youngest are as traditional as the oldest,
      with the baby boomers falling in between. It is not unusual for married couples
      in this age group to embrace natural family planning as opposed to artificial
      birth control and for singles to reject premarital sex. These young adults are
      seeking authoritative guidelines and meaningful commitments. Carroll's
      journalistic skills are evident in this very readable volume about a tendency toward
      traditionalism that she predicts will spread. Highly recommended.
      John Moryl, Yeshiva Univ. Lib., New York
      Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.--This text refers to the
      Hardcover edition.

      From Booklist
      During the past decade, there has been a remarkable resurgence of religious
      fervor among members of Generation X. Born into privilege and prosperity, many
      of these young people are now searching for spiritual, rather than
      materialistic, fulfillment. They are finding answers to their questions in a relatively
      new style of Christian Orthodoxy. Conservative churches are attracting droves
      of new members seeking both substance and sustenance. Not content to merely
      practice their faith privately, many of the newly committed embrace a more
      evangelical and action-oriented approach to worship. Based on countless interviews
      with young adults across the country, this exploration probes beneath the
      surface of Christian Orthodoxy, analyzing the root causes and the diverse
      consequences of this new religious movement. Margaret Flanagan
      Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved--This text
      refers to the Hardcover edition.

      Wall Street Journal
      Carroll combines first-hand reporting with social-science metrics to examine
      a remarkable trend toward religious orthodoxy among Americans...

      Publisherís Weekly
      Önovel and timely... a book that generously and comprehensively examines a
      group that is often misunderstood and caricatured.

      Fr. Benedict J. Groeschel, CFR, author, Journey Towards God
      Öyou canít afford to leave this book unread.

      Publisher's Weekly, July 15, 2002
      ...novel and timely...this is a book that generously and comprehensively
      examines a group that is often misunderstood and caricatured. --This text refers
      to the Hardcover edition.

      Book Description
      Now in Paperback! Born between 1965 and 1983, the young adults of Generation
      X grew up in an era of unprecedented wealth and consumerism. Rebelling against
      the liberal family, social, and academic environments in which they were
      raised, some have made strengthening their faith a priority.
      The New Faithful is a groundbreaking book that examines the growing trend
      toward religious orthodoxy among todayís young adults. Author and journalist
      Colleen Carroll offers strong opinions on how this movement might transform an
      American society steeped in moral relativism and secularism.
      Blending investigative journalism with in-depth analysis, Carroll seeks the
      reasons behind the choice of orthodoxy in a society that often denigrates
      traditional morality and rejects organized religion.

      About the Author
      Colleen Carroll is an award-winning journalist who has worked as a
      speechwriter to President George W. Bush. She has also contributed to a wide variety of
      publications including the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Memphis Commercial Appeal,
      and Washingtonian magazine. She currently resides in St. Louis.


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