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Perfect Pome - store bought pomegranate juice

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  • Harvey Correia
    I just saw this product for the first time at a Raley s supermarket store in Lodi last week and bought it to try. I think it was something like $4.29 for a 16
    Message 1 of 17 , Dec 20, 2010
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      I just saw this product for the first time at a Raley's supermarket store in
      Lodi last week and bought it to try. I think it was something like $4.29 for a
      16 ounce bottle. It is sweeter and less tart than other juices I've tried.
      Whereas others have seemed too tart, this may be a little too sweet even though
      it has no sugar added. The juice has been pasteurized and has the addition of
      calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate, asorbic acid, and Vitamin D. The juice
      has a brownish red color to it. There web site says they employ methods similar
      to those used for grape wine production (absent the fermentation).
      http://www.perfectpome.com/perfect-pome-story.php?page=story

      I'm interested in what other juices you've found and what you like or dislike
      about them.

      Harvey
    • Edward Chen
      I have cracked Pomegranate on whole tree. Does anyone know what causes it. Please see attachment picture. Edward ... From: Harvey Correia
      Message 2 of 17 , Dec 24, 2010
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      I have cracked Pomegranate on whole tree. Does anyone know what causes it. Please see attachment picture.

      Edward

      --- On Mon, 12/20/10, Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...> wrote:

      From: Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...>
      Subject: [PomWorldwide] Perfect Pome - store bought pomegranate juice
      To: pomworldwide@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Monday, December 20, 2010, 10:51 AM

       

      I just saw this product for the first time at a Raley's supermarket store in
      Lodi last week and bought it to try. I think it was something like $4.29 for a
      16 ounce bottle. It is sweeter and less tart than other juices I've tried.
      Whereas others have seemed too tart, this may be a little too sweet even though
      it has no sugar added. The juice has been pasteurized and has the addition of
      calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate, asorbic acid, and Vitamin D. The juice
      has a brownish red color to it. There web site says they employ methods similar
      to those used for grape wine production (absent the fermentation).
      http://www.perfectpome.com/perfect-pome-story.php?page=story

      I'm interested in what other juices you've found and what you like or dislike
      about them.

      Harvey


    • ariel023@inter.net.il
      Hi Chen Cracked PGs occurs genetically with certain varieties and more with mid late varieties when there is bad fertigation issues and non suitable soils The
      Message 3 of 17 , Dec 24, 2010
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        Hi Chen
        Cracked PGs occurs genetically with certain varieties and more with mid late varieties when there is bad fertigation issues and non suitable soils
         
        The cracks are common as the fruit approaches maturity and you get heat waves - or high sun irradiation - or very cold nights - or rain all that cause inequality temps and water status around the fruit
         
        The cracking results mainly from high or low turgidity in the fruit and the weak point is at the segments
         
        The advantage is that you can juice the fruit easily
         
        Decalyxing observations showed that it increases the rate and number of cracked fruits in mid stages of its development  
         
        Ariel
        seeing lots of cracked fruits in the markets - as these were not picked earlier because the market was floaded
        Thirty % of the fruits have the potential to get cracked but with bad fertigation you get 100% a

        ----- הודעה מקורית -----
        מאת: Edward Chen <echen13930@...>
        תאריך: Saturday, December 25, 2010 3:33
        נושא: Re: [PomWorldwide] Perfect Pome - store bought pomegranate juice
        אל: pomworldwide@yahoogroups.com, PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com


         

        > I have cracked Pomegranate on whole tree. Does anyone know what causes it. Please see attachment picture.

        Edward

        --- On Mon, 12/20/10, Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...> wrote:

        From: Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...>
        Subject: [PomWorldwide] Perfect Pome - store bought pomegranate juice
        To: pomworldwide@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, December 20, 2010, 10:51 AM

         

        I just saw this product for the first time at a Raley's supermarket store in
        Lodi last week and bought it to try. I think it was something like $4.29 for a
        16 ounce bottle. It is sweeter and less tart than other juices I've tried.
        Whereas others have seemed too tart, this may be a little too sweet even though
        it has no sugar added. The juice has been pasteurized and has the addition of
        calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate, asorbic acid, and Vitamin D. The juice
        has a brownish red color to it. There web site says they employ methods similar
        to those used for grape wine production (absent the fermentation).
        http://www.perfectpome.com/perfect-pome-story.php?page=story

        I'm interested in what other juices you've found and what you like or dislike
        about them.

        Harvey






        ‭‮
      • Farah Beigi
        Dear Edward Fruit cracking in young fruits could be due to deficiencies of Calcium, Boron & Potassium and in mature fruit imbalances of moisture or high
        Message 4 of 17 , Dec 27, 2010
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          Dear Edward


          Fruit cracking in young fruits could be due to deficiencies of Calcium, Boron & Potassium and in mature fruit imbalances of moisture or high fluctuations in diurnal temperatures.

          Eliminate high levels of fluctuation in soil moisture levels with regular and adequate amounts of irrigation during fruit development. 

          Certain cultivars are more prone to cracking while the others have been bred to resist fruit cracking.


          Best regards

          Farah



          --- On Sat, 12/25/10, Edward Chen <echen13930@...> wrote:

          From: Edward Chen <echen13930@...>
          Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Perfect Pome - store bought pomegranate juice
          To: pomworldwide@yahoogroups.com, PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Saturday, December 25, 2010, 5:00 AM

           

          I have cracked Pomegranate on whole tree. Does anyone know what causes it. Please see attachment picture.

          Edward

          --- On Mon, 12/20/10, Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...> wrote:

          From: Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...>
          Subject: [PomWorldwide] Perfect Pome - store bought pomegranate juice
          To: pomworldwide@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Monday, December 20, 2010, 10:51 AM

           

          I just saw this product for the first time at a Raley's supermarket store in
          Lodi last week and bought it to try. I think it was something like $4.29 for a
          16 ounce bottle. It is sweeter and less tart than other juices I've tried.
          Whereas others have seemed too tart, this may be a little too sweet even though
          it has no sugar added. The juice has been pasteurized and has the addition of
          calcium carbonate, potassium carbonate, asorbic acid, and Vitamin D. The juice
          has a brownish red color to it. There web site says they employ methods similar
          to those used for grape wine production (absent the fermentation).
          http://www.perfectpome.com/perfect-pome-story.php?page=story

          I'm interested in what other juices you've found and what you like or dislike
          about them.

          Harvey



        • Harvey Correia
          Hello Farah, Thank you for sharing your knowledge and addressing this split problem. I noticed it in my own fruits, especially with the Azadi cultivar. I did
          Message 5 of 17 , Dec 27, 2010
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            Hello Farah,

            Thank you for sharing your knowledge and addressing this split problem.  I noticed it in my own fruits, especially with the Azadi cultivar.  I did apply a broadcast spray of potash but probably should put some more concentrated around my young trees.  I believe my calcium levels are good and, if anything, boron is a bit high.

            When you have the time, please introduce yourself to the group.  I look forward to the information you'll be able to share with us and am glad we now have representation from an expert in Iran.  I was reflecting on the name I chose for the group which was formed a few years ago and think it is very appropriate as I met Farah from a gentleman named Jose from Portugal who I met from Barbara Baer who is not far from me here in California.

            Thanks again and best wishes,

            Harvey



            From: Farah Beigi <f.blackswan@...>
            To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Mon, December 27, 2010 12:50:45 AM
            Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Perfect Pome - store bought pomegranate juice

             

            Dear Edward


            Fruit cracking in young fruits could be due to deficiencies of Calcium, Boron & Potassium and in mature fruit imbalances of moisture or high fluctuations in diurnal temperatures.

            Eliminate high levels of fluctuation in soil moisture levels with regular and adequate amounts of irrigation during fruit development. 

            Certain cultivars are more prone to cracking while the others have been bred to resist fruit cracking.


            Best regards

            Farah



            --- On Sat, 12/25/10, Edward Chen <echen13930@...> wrote:

            From: Edward Chen <echen13930@...>
            Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Perfect Pome - store bought pomegranate juice
            To: pomworldwide@yahoogroups.com, PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, December 25, 2010, 5:00 AM

             

            I have cracked Pomegranate on whole tree. Does anyone know what causes it. Please see attachment picture.

            Edward



          • ariel023@inter.net.il
            The idea of shade cloth in the final stage of fruit development is to balance the plant moisture fluctuations and prevent sun burns Sunburns means that the
            Message 6 of 17 , Dec 27, 2010
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              The idea of shade cloth in the final stage of fruit development is to balance the plant moisture fluctuations and prevent sun burns
               
              Sunburns means that the exposed face of the fruit was at 50 celsius and more, thus there was moisture imbalance in the fruit caused by the heat afecting the moisture distribution even in the fruit
               
              There are differences between thin skinned fruits an thicker ones

              Despite genetical attributes - growing conditions and flowering time will affect the fruit skin thickness
               
               
              ariel's observations

              ----- הודעה מקורית -----
              מאת: Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...>
              תאריך: Monday, December 27, 2010 12:50
              נושא: [PomWorldwide] Split pomegranates
              אל: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com


               

              > Hello Farah,

              Thank you for sharing your knowledge and addressing this split problem.  I noticed it in my own fruits, especially with the Azadi cultivar.  I did apply a broadcast spray of potash but probably should put some more concentrated around my young trees.  I believe my calcium levels are good and, if anything, boron is a bit high.

              > When you have the time, please introduce yourself to the group.  I look forward to the information you'll be able to share with us and am glad we now have representation from an expert in Iran.  I was reflecting on the name I chose for the group which was formed a few years ago and think it is very appropriate as I met Farah from a gentleman named Jose from Portugal who I met from Barbara Baer who is not far from me here in California.

              Thanks again and best wishes,

              > Harvey




              From: Farah Beigi <f.blackswan@...>
              To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Mon, December 27, 2010 12:50:45 AM
              Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Perfect Pome - store bought pomegranate juice

               

              Dear Edward


              Fruit cracking in young fruits could be due to deficiencies of Calcium, Boron & Potassium and in mature fruit imbalances of moisture or high fluctuations in diurnal temperatures.

              Eliminate high levels of fluctuation in soil moisture levels with regular and adequate amounts of irrigation during fruit development. 

              Certain cultivars are more prone to cracking while the others have been bred to resist fruit cracking.


              Best regards

              Farah



              --- On Sat, 12/25/10, Edward Chen <echen13930@...> wrote:

              From: Edward Chen <echen13930@...>
              Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Perfect Pome - store bought pomegranate juice
              To: pomworldwide@yahoogroups.com, PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Saturday, December 25, 2010, 5:00 AM

               

              I have cracked Pomegranate on whole tree. Does anyone know what causes it. Please see attachment picture.

              Edward












              ‭‮
            • Arian H
              btw Harvey, out of the pomegranates you sent me, Azadi was one of my consistant favorates. Parfianka was also close tie. DesertNYI was also good. and there was
              Message 7 of 17 , Jan 5, 2011
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                btw Harvey, out of the pomegranates you sent me, Azadi was one of my consistant favorates. Parfianka was also close tie. DesertNYI was also good. and there was a russian sounding one that was also good. Least favorite was a russian sounding one that was consistantly very acidic (too much so for my teeth :) ). In addition to 2 Salavatski's, I got a couple Parfianka's from Bass, they grew twice as large/thicker branches first year as the Salavatski's, but we'll see if it survives the cold as well (dormant in the shed currently). Trying also Saveh as mentioned earlier next year (although its probably not the 'mountain' saveh I saw listed as one of most cold-hardy), and 'Agat' which is listed as 'low growing Russian variety was developed to withstand heavy snow and cold' on rolling river nurserys website. Ever hear of 'Agat'?
              • harveycorreia
                Hello Arian, It is interesting how some people love Azadi and some find it lacking adequate flavor to make it even worth the time to eat. I m either a very
                Message 8 of 17 , Jan 5, 2011
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                  Hello Arian,

                  It is interesting how some people love Azadi and some find it lacking
                  adequate flavor to make it even worth the time to eat. I'm either a
                  very tolerant person or have weak taste buds because I like just about
                  all of them. One additional good item to report regarding Azadi: I've
                  observed this winter that it stores quite well. I kept some fruits of a
                  dozen or so varieties in my cool garage and nearly all of the fruits of
                  most varieties have rotted. On the other hand, nearly all of the Azadi
                  are still good, even though the rind is dried up.

                  I've seen the name 'Agat' but don't believe it's one I've ever tasted.

                  Best wishes,

                  Harvey

                  --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "Arian H" <arianhojat2000@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > btw Harvey, out of the pomegranates you sent me, Azadi was one of my
                  consistant favorates. Parfianka was also close tie. DesertNYI was also
                  good. and there was a russian sounding one that was also good. Least
                  favorite was a russian sounding one that was consistantly very acidic
                  (too much so for my teeth :) ). In addition to 2 Salavatski's, I got a
                  couple Parfianka's from Bass, they grew twice as large/thicker branches
                  first year as the Salavatski's, but we'll see if it survives the cold as
                  well (dormant in the shed currently). Trying also Saveh as mentioned
                  earlier next year (although its probably not the 'mountain' saveh I saw
                  listed as one of most cold-hardy), and 'Agat' which is listed as 'low
                  growing Russian variety was developed to withstand heavy snow and cold'
                  on rolling river nurserys website. Ever hear of 'Agat'?
                  >
                • Ling
                  Harvey, the taste of Azadi changes a bit with weather. The fruits ripened in the summer of Texas (August) taste totally bland, while the ones ripen in the
                  Message 9 of 17 , Jan 6, 2011
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                    Harvey, the taste of Azadi changes a bit with weather. The fruits ripened in the summer of Texas (August) taste totally bland, while the ones ripen in the fall taste not great but OK. Texas fall is like mediterranean summer. Azadi in California or Pennsylvania should be more flavorful than the one in Texas. This is quite different from Eversweet which tastes the same no matter when it is harvested.

                    Since my Azadi is still small, I plan to remove all flowers until June and force the fruit to ripen in the fall. This won't be feasible in two or three years. Azadi is the most vigorus grower in my collection. It will be beyond my easy reach very soon.

                    Does anybody have an early variety? I suspect that early varieties should taste better in Texas than elsewhere.

                    Regards -Ling

                    --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "harveycorreia" <harveycorreia@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello Arian,
                    >
                    > It is interesting how some people love Azadi and some find it lacking
                    > adequate flavor to make it even worth the time to eat. I'm either a
                    > very tolerant person or have weak taste buds because I like just about
                    > all of them. One additional good item to report regarding Azadi: I've
                    > observed this winter that it stores quite well. I kept some fruits of a
                    > dozen or so varieties in my cool garage and nearly all of the fruits of
                    > most varieties have rotted. On the other hand, nearly all of the Azadi
                    > are still good, even though the rind is dried up.
                    >
                    > I've seen the name 'Agat' but don't believe it's one I've ever tasted.
                    >
                    > Best wishes,
                    >
                    > Harvey
                    >
                    > --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "Arian H" <arianhojat2000@>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > btw Harvey, out of the pomegranates you sent me, Azadi was one of my
                    > consistant favorates. Parfianka was also close tie. DesertNYI was also
                    > good. and there was a russian sounding one that was also good. Least
                    > favorite was a russian sounding one that was consistantly very acidic
                    > (too much so for my teeth :) ). In addition to 2 Salavatski's, I got a
                    > couple Parfianka's from Bass, they grew twice as large/thicker branches
                    > first year as the Salavatski's, but we'll see if it survives the cold as
                    > well (dormant in the shed currently). Trying also Saveh as mentioned
                    > earlier next year (although its probably not the 'mountain' saveh I saw
                    > listed as one of most cold-hardy), and 'Agat' which is listed as 'low
                    > growing Russian variety was developed to withstand heavy snow and cold'
                    > on rolling river nurserys website. Ever hear of 'Agat'?
                    > >
                    >
                  • Harvey Correia
                    I have Grenada which is an early variety. I didn t get around to picking any fruit from it until it had spoiled as I was pre-occupied with doctor visits and
                    Message 10 of 17 , Jan 6, 2011
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                      I have Grenada which is an early variety.  I didn't get around to picking any fruit from it until it had spoiled as I was pre-occupied with doctor visits and chestnut harvest.

                      I'm a bit confused why you think an early variety would do well there when you indicated late varieties taste better.

                      Not everyone agrees with your taste assessment of Eversweet.  I think it's okay and some people like it quite well.  I can safely say that Mike Nave does share your opinion of Eversweet.  I personally think that there are better sweet types that suit my taste preferences but that's just a matter of opinion.  And that's a fact. ;)

                      Harvey
                      Isleton, California
                      (USDA hardiness zone 9b, Sunset zone 14)



                      From: Ling <lingcen1@...>
                      To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thu, January 6, 2011 9:38:52 AM
                      Subject: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates

                       

                      Harvey, the taste of Azadi changes a bit with weather. The fruits ripened in the summer of Texas (August) taste totally bland, while the ones ripen in the fall taste not great but OK. Texas fall is like mediterranean summer. Azadi in California or Pennsylvania should be more flavorful than the one in Texas. This is quite different from Eversweet which tastes the same no matter when it is harvested.

                      Since my Azadi is still small, I plan to remove all flowers until June and force the fruit to ripen in the fall. This won't be feasible in two or three years. Azadi is the most vigorus grower in my collection. It will be beyond my easy reach very soon.

                      Does anybody have an early variety? I suspect that early varieties should taste better in Texas than elsewhere.

                      Regards -Ling

                      --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "harveycorreia" <harveycorreia@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hello Arian,
                      >
                      > It is interesting how some people love Azadi and some find it lacking
                      > adequate flavor to make it even worth the time to eat. I'm either a
                      > very tolerant person or have weak taste buds because I like just about
                      > all of them. One additional good item to report regarding Azadi: I've
                      > observed this winter that it stores quite well. I kept some fruits of a
                      > dozen or so varieties in my cool garage and nearly all of the fruits of
                      > most varieties have rotted. On the other hand, nearly all of the Azadi
                      > are still good, even though the rind is dried up.
                      >
                      > I've seen the name 'Agat' but don't believe it's one I've ever tasted.
                      >
                      > Best wishes,
                      >
                      > Harvey
                      >
                      > --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "Arian H" <arianhojat2000@>
                      > wrote:
                      > >
                      > > btw Harvey, out of the pomegranates you sent me, Azadi was one of my
                      > consistant favorates. Parfianka was also close tie. DesertNYI was also
                      > good. and there was a russian sounding one that was also good. Least
                      > favorite was a russian sounding one that was consistantly very acidic
                      > (too much so for my teeth :) ). In addition to 2 Salavatski's, I got a
                      > couple Parfianka's from Bass, they grew twice as large/thicker branches
                      > first year as the Salavatski's, but we'll see if it survives the cold as
                      > well (dormant in the shed currently). Trying also Saveh as mentioned
                      > earlier next year (although its probably not the 'mountain' saveh I saw
                      > listed as one of most cold-hardy), and 'Agat' which is listed as 'low
                      > growing Russian variety was developed to withstand heavy snow and cold'
                      > on rolling river nurserys website. Ever hear of 'Agat'?
                      > >
                      >


                    • Michael Nave
                      When Harvey sent me lots of different varieties of poms to do a blind taste test (and thanks again for that, Harvey), I discovered two things I thought were
                      Message 11 of 17 , Jan 6, 2011
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                        When Harvey sent me lots of different varieties of poms to do a blind taste test (and thanks again for that, Harvey), I discovered two things I thought were very interesting:

                        1. I find Eversweet to be lousy even when I don't know what it is, so my aversion to it is very real and not a simple prejudice based on a few bad ones in the past. To me, it's just a really blah pom.

                        2. I have always thought that Wonderful was too tart and the flavors too simple to be a really good pom. I was wrong. While one of the Wonderful poms that Harvey sent was tart and simple, the other was very full flavored and not so tart, which led me to this conclusion - Wonderful is a really good pom that is usually picked too early. If it is left to ripen fully, it really is a superior pom.

                        --- On Thu, 1/6/11, Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...> wrote:

                        From: Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...>
                        Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates
                        To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Thursday, January 6, 2011, 10:26 PM



                        I have Grenada which is an early variety.  I didn't get around to picking any fruit from it until it had spoiled as I was pre-occupied with doctor visits and chestnut harvest.

                        I'm a bit confused why you think an early variety would do well there when you indicated late varieties taste better.

                        Not everyone agrees with your taste assessment of Eversweet.  I think it's okay and some people like it quite well.  I can safely say that Mike Nave does share your opinion of Eversweet.  I personally think that there are better sweet types that suit my taste preferences but that's just a matter of opinion.  And that's a fact. ;)

                        Harvey
                        Isleton, California
                        (USDA hardiness zone 9b, Sunset zone 14)



                        From: Ling <lingcen1@...>
                        To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thu, January 6, 2011 9:38:52 AM
                        Subject: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates

                         

                        Harvey, the taste of Azadi changes a bit with weather. The fruits ripened in the summer of Texas (August) taste totally bland, while the ones ripen in the fall taste not great but OK. Texas fall is like mediterranean summer. Azadi in California or Pennsylvania should be more flavorful than the one in Texas. This is quite different from Eversweet which tastes the same no matter when it is harvested.

                        Since my Azadi is still small, I plan to remove all flowers until June and force the fruit to ripen in the fall. This won't be feasible in two or three years. Azadi is the most vigorus grower in my collection. It will be beyond my easy reach very soon.

                        Does anybody have an early variety? I suspect that early varieties should taste better in Texas than elsewhere.

                        Regards -Ling

                        --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "harveycorreia" <harveycorreia@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hello Arian,
                        >
                        > It is interesting how some people love Azadi and some find it lacking
                        > adequate flavor to make it even worth the time to eat. I'm either a
                        > very tolerant person or have weak taste buds because I like just about
                        > all of them. One additional good item to report regarding Azadi: I've
                        > observed this winter that it stores quite well. I kept some fruits of a
                        > dozen or so varieties in my cool garage and nearly all of the fruits of
                        > most varieties have rotted. On the other hand, nearly all of the Azadi
                        > are still good, even though the rind is dried up.
                        >
                        > I've seen the name 'Agat' but don't believe it's one I've ever tasted.
                        >
                        > Best wishes,
                        >
                        > Harvey
                        >
                        > --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "Arian H" <arianhojat2000@>
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > btw Harvey, out of the pomegranates you sent me, Azadi was one of my
                        > consistant favorates. Parfianka was also close tie. DesertNYI was also
                        > good. and there was a russian sounding one that was also good. Least
                        > favorite was a russian sounding one that was consistantly very acidic
                        > (too much so for my teeth :) ). In addition to 2 Salavatski's, I got a
                        > couple Parfianka's from Bass, they grew twice as large/thicker branches
                        > first year as the Salavatski's, but we'll see if it survives the cold as
                        > well (dormant in the shed currently). Trying also Saveh as mentioned
                        > earlier next year (although its probably not the 'mountain' saveh I saw
                        > listed as one of most cold-hardy), and 'Agat' which is listed as 'low
                        > growing Russian variety was developed to withstand heavy snow and cold'
                        > on rolling river nurserys website. Ever hear of 'Agat'?
                        > >
                        >





                      • Harvey Correia
                        I had my first taste of a nice Wonderful in November 2008, I believe. It s one that I was prejudiced against but I did like it much more than I thought. It s
                        Message 12 of 17 , Jan 6, 2011
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                          I had my first taste of a nice Wonderful in November 2008, I believe.  It's one that I was prejudiced against but I did like it much more than I thought.  It's biggest drawback to me, as I recall, is that its seeds were a little harder than I think should exist in a favorite pom.  Everyone is biased either against perceptions or what they consider to be an ideal taste, etc.  I was an auditor in a lending agency for about 20 years and I believe I was successful in my career in that position because I learned to recognize my biases and work very hard to be objective.  Still, I realize my own taste preferences will probably evolve over time and I may find that to be more difficult in judging pomegranates at some time in the future.  This may seem a bit strange, but when tasting pomegranates I sometimes think of White Zinfandel wine.  Back in the 1980s I liked several brands of this wine and found very few that were bad.  I've tried to avoid drinking it at all for the past ten years because every taste I've had of it is terrible.  I really find it hard to believe my taste preferences have changed so much that lead me to find nothing good at all about this wine (like Eversweet poms for some people) and keep wondering if less effort has gone into making a good wine of this type as people's taste preferences have shifted to other varietals/methods.  no matter how much I've tried to figure out what might be appealing to some with White Zin, I just don't get it.  I'm not sure what to make of it.

                          Harvey


                          From: Michael Nave <jmichaelnave@...>
                          To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thu, January 6, 2011 10:38:37 PM
                          Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates

                           

                          When Harvey sent me lots of different varieties of poms to do a blind taste test (and thanks again for that, Harvey), I discovered two things I thought were very interesting:

                          1. I find Eversweet to be lousy even when I don't know what it is, so my aversion to it is very real and not a simple prejudice based on a few bad ones in the past. To me, it's just a really blah pom.

                          2. I have always thought that Wonderful was too tart and the flavors too simple to be a really good pom. I was wrong. While one of the Wonderful poms that Harvey sent was tart and simple, the other was very full flavored and not so tart, which led me to this conclusion - Wonderful is a really good pom that is usually picked too early. If it is left to ripen fully, it really is a superior pom.

                          --- On Thu, 1/6/11, Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...> wrote:

                          From: Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...>
                          Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates
                          To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Thursday, January 6, 2011, 10:26 PM



                          I have Grenada which is an early variety.  I didn't get around to picking any fruit from it until it had spoiled as I was pre-occupied with doctor visits and chestnut harvest.

                          I'm a bit confused why you think an early variety would do well there when you indicated late varieties taste better.

                          Not everyone agrees with your taste assessment of Eversweet.  I think it's okay and some people like it quite well.  I can safely say that Mike Nave does share your opinion of Eversweet.  I personally think that there are better sweet types that suit my taste preferences but that's just a matter of opinion.  And that's a fact. ;)

                          Harvey
                          Isleton, California
                          (USDA hardiness zone 9b, Sunset zone 14)



                          From: Ling <lingcen1@...>
                          To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Thu, January 6, 2011 9:38:52 AM
                          Subject: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates

                           

                          Harvey, the taste of Azadi changes a bit with weather. The fruits ripened in the summer of Texas (August) taste totally bland, while the ones ripen in the fall taste not great but OK. Texas fall is like mediterranean summer. Azadi in California or Pennsylvania should be more flavorful than the one in Texas. This is quite different from Eversweet which tastes the same no matter when it is harvested.

                          Since my Azadi is still small, I plan to remove all flowers until June and force the fruit to ripen in the fall. This won't be feasible in two or three years. Azadi is the most vigorus grower in my collection. It will be beyond my easy reach very soon.

                          Does anybody have an early variety? I suspect that early varieties should taste better in Texas than elsewhere.

                          Regards -Ling

                          --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "harveycorreia" <harveycorreia@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hello Arian,
                          >
                          > It is interesting how some people love Azadi and some find it lacking
                          > adequate flavor to make it even worth the time to eat. I'm either a
                          > very tolerant person or have weak taste buds because I like just about
                          > all of them. One additional good item to report regarding Azadi: I've
                          > observed this winter that it stores quite well. I kept some fruits of a
                          > dozen or so varieties in my cool garage and nearly all of the fruits of
                          > most varieties have rotted. On the other hand, nearly all of the Azadi
                          > are still good, even though the rind is dried up.
                          >
                          > I've seen the name 'Agat' but don't believe it's one I've ever tasted.
                          >
                          > Best wishes,
                          >
                          > Harvey
                          >
                          > --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "Arian H" <arianhojat2000@>
                          > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > btw Harvey, out of the pomegranates you sent me, Azadi was one of my
                          > consistant favorates. Parfianka was also close tie. DesertNYI was also
                          > good. and there was a russian sounding one that was also good. Least
                          > favorite was a russian sounding one that was consistantly very acidic
                          > (too much so for my teeth :) ). In addition to 2 Salavatski's, I got a
                          > couple Parfianka's from Bass, they grew twice as large/thicker branches
                          > first year as the Salavatski's, but we'll see if it survives the cold as
                          > well (dormant in the shed currently). Trying also Saveh as mentioned
                          > earlier next year (although its probably not the 'mountain' saveh I saw
                          > listed as one of most cold-hardy), and 'Agat' which is listed as 'low
                          > growing Russian variety was developed to withstand heavy snow and cold'
                          > on rolling river nurserys website. Ever hear of 'Agat'?
                          > >
                          >






                        • Michael Nave
                          With any food I think there s a tendency at first to appreciate anything new, including simple flavors. As you become more acqainted with it, you appreciate
                          Message 13 of 17 , Jan 7, 2011
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                            With any food I think there's a tendency at first to appreciate anything new, including simple flavors. As you become more acqainted with it, you appreciate more complex flavors. Eversweet has simple flavors.

                            --- On Thu, 1/6/11, Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...> wrote:

                            From: Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...>
                            Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates
                            To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Thursday, January 6, 2011, 10:58 PM



                            I had my first taste of a nice Wonderful in November 2008, I believe.  It's one that I was prejudiced against but I did like it much more than I thought.  It's biggest drawback to me, as I recall, is that its seeds were a little harder than I think should exist in a favorite pom.  Everyone is biased either against perceptions or what they consider to be an ideal taste, etc.  I was an auditor in a lending agency for about 20 years and I believe I was successful in my career in that position because I learned to recognize my biases and work very hard to be objective.  Still, I realize my own taste preferences will probably evolve over time and I may find that to be more difficult in judging pomegranates at some time in the future.  This may seem a bit strange, but when tasting pomegranates I sometimes think of White Zinfandel wine.  Back in the 1980s I liked several brands of this wine and found very few that were bad.  I've tried to avoid drinking it at all for the past ten years because every taste I've had of it is terrible.  I really find it hard to believe my taste preferences have changed so much that lead me to find nothing good at all about this wine (like Eversweet poms for some people) and keep wondering if less effort has gone into making a good wine of this type as people's taste preferences have shifted to other varietals/methods.  no matter how much I've tried to figure out what might be appealing to some with White Zin, I just don't get it.  I'm not sure what to make of it.

                            Harvey


                            From: Michael Nave <jmichaelnave@...>
                            To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Thu, January 6, 2011 10:38:37 PM
                            Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates

                             

                            When Harvey sent me lots of different varieties of poms to do a blind taste test (and thanks again for that, Harvey), I discovered two things I thought were very interesting:

                            1. I find Eversweet to be lousy even when I don't know what it is, so my aversion to it is very real and not a simple prejudice based on a few bad ones in the past. To me, it's just a really blah pom.

                            2. I have always thought that Wonderful was too tart and the flavors too simple to be a really good pom. I was wrong. While one of the Wonderful poms that Harvey sent was tart and simple, the other was very full flavored and not so tart, which led me to this conclusion - Wonderful is a really good pom that is usually picked too early. If it is left to ripen fully, it really is a superior pom.

                            --- On Thu, 1/6/11, Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...> wrote:

                            From: Harvey Correia <harveycorreia@...>
                            Subject: Re: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates
                            To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                            Date: Thursday, January 6, 2011, 10:26 PM



                            I have Grenada which is an early variety.  I didn't get around to picking any fruit from it until it had spoiled as I was pre-occupied with doctor visits and chestnut harvest.

                            I'm a bit confused why you think an early variety would do well there when you indicated late varieties taste better.

                            Not everyone agrees with your taste assessment of Eversweet.  I think it's okay and some people like it quite well.  I can safely say that Mike Nave does share your opinion of Eversweet.  I personally think that there are better sweet types that suit my taste preferences but that's just a matter of opinion.  And that's a fact. ;)

                            Harvey
                            Isleton, California
                            (USDA hardiness zone 9b, Sunset zone 14)



                            From: Ling <lingcen1@...>
                            To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Thu, January 6, 2011 9:38:52 AM
                            Subject: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates

                             

                            Harvey, the taste of Azadi changes a bit with weather. The fruits ripened in the summer of Texas (August) taste totally bland, while the ones ripen in the fall taste not great but OK. Texas fall is like mediterranean summer. Azadi in California or Pennsylvania should be more flavorful than the one in Texas. This is quite different from Eversweet which tastes the same no matter when it is harvested.

                            Since my Azadi is still small, I plan to remove all flowers until June and force the fruit to ripen in the fall. This won't be feasible in two or three years. Azadi is the most vigorus grower in my collection. It will be beyond my easy reach very soon.

                            Does anybody have an early variety? I suspect that early varieties should taste better in Texas than elsewhere.

                            Regards -Ling

                            --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "harveycorreia" <harveycorreia@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hello Arian,
                            >
                            > It is interesting how some people love Azadi and some find it lacking
                            > adequate flavor to make it even worth the time to eat. I'm either a
                            > very tolerant person or have weak taste buds because I like just about
                            > all of them. One additional good item to report regarding Azadi: I've
                            > observed this winter that it stores quite well. I kept some fruits of a
                            > dozen or so varieties in my cool garage and nearly all of the fruits of
                            > most varieties have rotted. On the other hand, nearly all of the Azadi
                            > are still good, even though the rind is dried up.
                            >
                            > I've seen the name 'Agat' but don't believe it's one I've ever tasted.
                            >
                            > Best wishes,
                            >
                            > Harvey
                            >
                            > --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, "Arian H" <arianhojat2000@>
                            > wrote:
                            > >
                            > > btw Harvey, out of the pomegranates you sent me, Azadi was one of my
                            > consistant favorates. Parfianka was also close tie. DesertNYI was also
                            > good. and there was a russian sounding one that was also good. Least
                            > favorite was a russian sounding one that was consistantly very acidic
                            > (too much so for my teeth :) ). In addition to 2 Salavatski's, I got a
                            > couple Parfianka's from Bass, they grew twice as large/thicker branches
                            > first year as the Salavatski's, but we'll see if it survives the cold as
                            > well (dormant in the shed currently). Trying also Saveh as mentioned
                            > earlier next year (although its probably not the 'mountain' saveh I saw
                            > listed as one of most cold-hardy), and 'Agat' which is listed as 'low
                            > growing Russian variety was developed to withstand heavy snow and cold'
                            > on rolling river nurserys website. Ever hear of 'Agat'?
                            > >
                            >









                          • Ling
                            I totally agree on wonderful. I bought a box of those extra large wonderful PG from Costco (easily over 1 lb per PG). At least half of them tasted really
                            Message 14 of 17 , Jan 7, 2011
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                              I totally agree on wonderful. I bought a box of those extra large wonderful PG from Costco (easily over 1 lb per PG). At least half of them tasted really good. The other half lacked some sweetness (picked too early). While the seeds are not super soft, it is quite chewable. Also the deep red aril looks really nice. Since those are Californian grown, I expect the Texas grown one will have harder seeds and maybe less desirable. I planted both grenada and wonderful at my new house and should have fruits this year. This reminds me of apples. When I lived in Portland, Oregon, every nursery (online or local) will claim its varieties of apple are superior to the ordinary ones you can buy from the store. As it turned out, none of them surpassed the store bought Fuji apples. So far it seems at least Parfianka is superior to Wonderful.

                              The reason I think the early varieties may tastes better in Texas is that Texas spring is warmer and hotter than say California. So the early varieties can ripen better. Grenada is not early enough. I am trying to find a variety that will ripen in June or early July. Most PG's I grew ripen its fruit in August (the worst month).

                              Regards -Ling


                              --- In PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com, Michael Nave <jmichaelnave@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > When Harvey sent me lots of different varieties of poms to do a blind taste test (and thanks again for that, Harvey), I discovered two things I thought were very interesting:
                              >
                              > 1. I find Eversweet to be lousy even when I don't know what it is, so my aversion to it is very real and not a simple prejudice based on a few bad ones in the past. To me, it's just a really blah pom.
                              >
                              > 2. I have always thought that Wonderful was too tart and the flavors too simple to be a really good pom. I was wrong. While one of the Wonderful poms that Harvey sent was tart and simple, the other was very full flavored and not so tart, which led me to this conclusion - Wonderful is a really good pom that is usually picked too early. If it is left to ripen fully, it really is a superior pom.
                              >
                            • ariel023@inter.net.il
                              Dear Michael Nave I agree with you about the latest Wonderful var that when it is picked in the right time - it possesses lots of qualities I think that
                              Message 15 of 17 , Jan 7, 2011
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                                Dear Michael Nave
                                I agree with you about the latest  Wonderful var that when it is picked in the right time - it possesses lots of qualities
                                 
                                I think that growers do not well pollinate the fruits and do not thin the late smaller fruits and when extra irrigation is applied - the fruits turn bad
                                 
                                There is an internal fungii in Israel that affects the cold stored PGs 
                                 
                                Cold sored PGs lose the unique qualities and thus I suggest to Harvey to grow and sell Fresh PG vars that handle and travel well
                                 
                                Ariel
                                Israel is over producing PGs and the extras cannot be exported
                                ‭‮
                              • Arian H
                                Harvey, Just found and checked your purelypoms.com website... I think the russian one that was too tart for me started with G... maybe Gissarski Alyi or
                                Message 16 of 17 , Jan 8, 2011
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                                  Harvey,
                                  Just found and checked your purelypoms.com website...
                                  I think the russian one that was too tart for me started with G... maybe Gissarski Alyi or Gissarskii Rozovy ... Btw i enjoy all pomegrantes too. I ate all of the 22 you sent with my sisters :). Just a preference to have less tartness :).

                                  Just remembered the other russian ones you sent might have been:
                                  Medovyi Vahsha and/or Vikusnyi/Vischnevy. They were really good as well.

                                  The Sin Pepe also had a good taste and were the biggest sized ones (along side the Azadi's).

                                  The angel red, austin, and couple others only had one and my sister ate them, so not sure how they were.

                                  PS Harvey,

                                  I went to visit my relatives for Christmas last week and I was pretty excited to find pomegranates all over the place still for sale out there (kinda fazing out in my area in December)... My uncle had bought 150 for $100 at a local farmers market lol in San Fran (san fran usually expensive!).
                                  Nice to extend eating them (they were however pretty small but pretty good deal for that price :) ).

                                  -Arian
                                • Harvey Correia
                                  Hello Arian, I m pretty sure I sent you Gissarski Rosovyi. It was the favorite of Mike Nave s of the 18 or so varieties I sent him to try out and I agree it s
                                  Message 17 of 17 , Jan 8, 2011
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                                    Hello Arian,

                                    I'm pretty sure I sent you Gissarski Rosovyi.  It was the favorite of Mike Nave's of the 18 or so varieties I sent him to try out and I agree it's a good fruit, although I wish the rind was more attractive.

                                    Vkusnyi and Medovyi Vahsha are also probably others I sent you.  Medovyi Vahsha is more of a sweet type.

                                    Sin Pepe is my least vigorous variety and least productive, but the few fruits that did grow mostly were pretty good size.  Azadi is very productive (and very thorny!) and I had lots of fairly large fruits but also quite a few small fruits (should have thinned even more).

                                    Here in California the smaller Wonderful pomegranates are often found at cheap prices late in the season as it's the last chance to get them sold.  I don't think I've ever bought one in a store that was very ripe, unfortunately.

                                    Harvey


                                    From: Arian H <arianhojat2000@...>
                                    To: PomWorldwide@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Sat, January 8, 2011 11:39:24 AM
                                    Subject: [PomWorldwide] Re: Split pomegranates

                                     

                                    Harvey,
                                    Just found and checked your purelypoms.com website...
                                    I think the russian one that was too tart for me started with G... maybe Gissarski Alyi or Gissarskii Rozovy ... Btw i enjoy all pomegrantes too. I ate all of the 22 you sent with my sisters :). Just a preference to have less tartness :).

                                    Just remembered the other russian ones you sent might have been:
                                    Medovyi Vahsha and/or Vikusnyi/Vischnevy. They were really good as well.

                                    The Sin Pepe also had a good taste and were the biggest sized ones (along side the Azadi's).

                                    The angel red, austin, and couple others only had one and my sister ate them, so not sure how they were.

                                    PS Harvey,

                                    I went to visit my relatives for Christmas last week and I was pretty excited to find pomegranates all over the place still for sale out there (kinda fazing out in my area in December)... My uncle had bought 150 for $100 at a local farmers market lol in San Fran (san fran usually expensive!).
                                    Nice to extend eating them (they were however pretty small but pretty good deal for that price :) ).

                                    -Arian


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