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Beginning to Program the csm84

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  • weboss57
    OK, I now have the machines in place with power and air. I had a slight problem as to hooking up power on 1 machine. It seems the machine was configured to
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 9, 2007
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      OK, I now have the machines in place with power and air. I had a
      slight problem as to hooking up power on 1 machine. It seems the
      machine was configured to run on 110v. During power up the monitors
      would pop a circuit breaker on the machine. To make a long story
      short the crt's were replacements and drew to much power for the 110v
      configuration and must have a separate power source for the machine.
      Also while I am on this here is the question for the day (and I know
      this answer)
      What is the key for inside of the lower right access panel ?
      It is in there to place the machine in a maintenance mode.
      The switch is unlabeled and in maint. position the machine will run
      around 10% of normal speed.

      I am looking for some abbreviated guidelines on how best to start
      programming a new pcb in our machine. I have been pouring over the
      manuals and wish there was a quick start page (probably too much to
      hope for).

      Bob
    • Jon Elson
      ... Mine was, too. It blinked the lights when it moved. I changed the transformer taps to the 240 V setting, it works much better. During power up the
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 9, 2007
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        weboss57 wrote:
        > OK, I now have the machines in place with power and air. I had a
        > slight problem as to hooking up power on 1 machine. It seems the
        > machine was configured to run on 110v.
        Mine was, too. It blinked the lights when it moved. I changed
        the transformer taps to the 240 V setting, it works much better.
        During power up the monitors
        > would pop a circuit breaker on the machine. To make a long story
        > short the crt's were replacements and drew to much power for the 110v
        > configuration and must have a separate power source for the machine.
        My monitors were made by Philips (only real Philips part on the
        machine.)

        > Also while I am on this here is the question for the day (and I know
        > this answer)
        > What is the key for inside of the lower right access panel ?
        It allows you to run the machine (slowly) with the covers open.
        YOu only get 10 or 20% of full speed in this mode, homing the
        axes takes forever.
        > It is in there to place the machine in a maintenance mode.
        > The switch is unlabeled and in maint. position the machine will run
        > around 10% of normal speed.
        >
        Yes, exactly. But, if you need to have your head and arms in
        there while doing things, like watching how it picks up a part
        to see why it is occasionally dropping one, this is the safe way
        to do it. It will never move fast enough you can't get out of
        the way. I've been poking around in there and had it hit my
        hand a couple times while at 100% speed. You do NOT want to get
        any part of your body between the gantry and the housing, it
        really has mass X velocity!
        > I am looking for some abbreviated guidelines on how best to start
        > programming a new pcb in our machine. I have been pouring over the
        > manuals and wish there was a quick start page (probably too much to
        > hope for).
        Assuming single PCB, you probably want to have a pair of
        fiducials. I use two through holes at opposite corners of the
        board. You have to set the logic to "off" to use a hole as a
        fiducial. You need to know the real coordinate of the right
        hand front corner, where the main stop is. I have my CAD system
        set the board origin to the lower left corner of the board edge.
        For back side of board, I feed the board in so that corner
        goes against the main stop. I mirror all X coords from the
        board, so a part at (5,10) will be changed in the mount list to
        (-5,10), which is where it will be relative from the main stop.

        Now, I get the CAD location of the holes I have selected for
        fiducials, mirror the X again, and enter these in the mount data
        entry. Note fiducials must be entered with the one closest to
        the machine home pos first.

        I use a program (on this group's files section) to convert my
        CAD system's data to the mount part of the machine's placement
        file. This program was written to take data from Protel's pick
        and place data, but most modern CAD systems produce a pretty
        similar file. I also have to prepare a component file that has
        lines with component descriptions that match the component
        descr. in the P&P file, and then gives feeder #, head # and part
        orientation as it is in the tape.

        For the back side, the board origin is the same as the main
        stop. For the front side, the origin's X is the main stop's
        coord minus the board's X dimension. The Y is always the same.

        There's a bunch of tricks related to the component file, too.
        Certain feeders are beyond the reach of certain heads.

        If you have vision, then there are a WHOLE bunch of other things
        that you need to set up, I don't know anything about that, as my
        machine doesn't have V or Z.

        I can answer more questions as you get there. I did one board
        completely manually, and don't recommend it. use the CAD data.
        it all works MUCH better.

        Jon
      • Jon Elson
        ... That means your machine is a PA1306/20 or earlier, the machines after that model start with the PA1306/40, and have digital servo drives, brushless motors
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 10, 2007
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          --- In PicknPlace@yahoogroups.com, Jon Elson <elson@...> wrote:
          >
          > weboss57 wrote:
          > > OK, I now have the machines in place with power and air. I had a
          > > slight problem as to hooking up power on 1 machine. It seems the
          > > machine was configured to run on 110v.
          That means your machine is a PA1306/20 or earlier, the machines after
          that model start with the PA1306/40, and have digital servo drives,
          brushless motors and 200 V is the lowest voltage it will run on.
          These later machines have the III after the model number, as in CSM84
          V III.

          Either way, a significant part of the machine runs on 200 V (Japanese
          power).
          > > I am looking for some abbreviated guidelines on how best to start
          > > programming a new pcb in our machine. I have been pouring over the
          > > manuals and wish there was a quick start page (probably too much to
          > > hope for).
          I'm guessing you have manuals specific for your machine.
          I got the wrong manuals twice, so I have a set newer, and a set older
          than my machine. I think Philips realized sometime after the 1304
          series came out that the English manuals were typical
          double-translated monstrocities (Japanese -> Dutch -> English) and
          were inscrutable to anyone. Even the pictures were degraded.
          If you can get a manual for a 1306/40 there are a number of
          improvements. (Unfortunately, there are also some small software
          changes that make the descriptions of some of the screens wrong.)

          I'm guessing the old manuals suffered from a culture problem, too,
          like the Japanese think it is disrespectful to "tell" somebody how to
          do something like "press button one, wait for green light, press
          button two." So, they have to describe what the buttons and lights
          mean, and then you have to figure out what order to press them in.

          The later manuals, presumably written once the Philips people actually
          understood the machine themselves, is much better in that regard, and
          has kind of a narrative section where they go through the setup and
          programming in an ordered fashion. It is still fairly vague, because
          the way you set up for a board depends on SO MANY variables related to
          the board itself. If you have multiple panelized boards, then you
          have panel or "block" fiducials, individual board fiducials, and maybe
          component fiducials, too. Also, you can have "bad marks" to tell the
          machine that particular individual boards should not be stuffed. You
          can have tape feeders, tube feeders, waffle trays and chips fed in
          from a large component sequencer. You can have glue and solder paste
          dispensers, vision, automatic nozzle exchange, Z-axis motors and on
          and on. And, you can use alignment pins and a variety of push-in
          devices to clamp the board. All of this stuff is programmable, too!

          I have the very basic machine, no vision, just the beam sensor and a
          mechanical alignment station, and 3 heads. I have made a couple
          nozzles to suit my particular mix. I also have a Contact Inc.
          vibratory feeder with 8 SOIC lanes. I have machined a couple add-on
          lanes that bolt to the side of the 8-lane top to handle some other
          sized parts like SSOP.

          I really need to write up a step by step setup guide, even for my own
          use, as I will forget some of the stuff I have figured out. One
          reason I have held off a bit on that is I have this feeling I am doing
          some of this the hard way, and missing some of the built-in functions
          of the software that are designed exactly for that purpose. I never
          was trained on the thing, I just had to learn it by myself. There
          were a number of alignment setting on the machine that clearly seem to
          have been wrong, but I don't know if I have them really right yet.

          Jon
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