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  • libianoaudrelyn
    Symbols A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617- 12.There are two sets
    Message 1 of 24 , Feb 1, 2008
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      Symbols

      A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in
      accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617-
      12.There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
      ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991.
      The "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is
      used for simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is
      sometimes unofficially described as "military", reflecting its
      origin if not its modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based
      on IEC 60617-12, has rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and
      allows representation of a much wider range of devices than is
      possible with the traditional symbols. The IEC's system has been
      adopted by other standards, such as EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and
      BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

      The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
      describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
      schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
      and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
      counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
      version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These
      were added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-
      shape symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not
      preferred, but is not considered to be in contradiction to that
      standard."

      In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
      circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
      and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
      Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The
      need for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape
      symbols are still the predominate style.[citation needed]

      Type Distinctive shape Rectangular shape Boolean algebra between A &
      B Truth table
      AND INPUT OUTPUT
      A B A AND B
      0 0 0
      0 1 0
      1 0 0
      1 1 1

      OR A + B INPUT OUTPUT
      A B A OR B
      0 0 0
      0 1 1
      1 0 1
      1 1 1

      NOT INPUT OUTPUT
      A NOT A
      0 1
      1 0

      In electronics a NOT gate is more commonly called an inverter. The
      circle on the symbol is called a bubble, and is generally used in
      circuit diagrams to indicate an inverted (active-low) input or
      output.[1][2]
      NAND INPUT OUTPUT
      A B A NAND B
      0 0 1
      0 1 1
      1 0 1
      1 1 0

      NOR INPUT OUTPUT
      A B A NOR B
      0 0 1
      0 1 0
      1 0 0
      1 1 0

      In practice, the cheapest gate to manufacture is usually the NAND
      gate. Additionally, Charles Peirce showed that NAND gates alone (as
      well as NOR gates alone) can be used to reproduce the functions of
      all the other logic gates.
      The 7400 chip, containing four NANDs. The two additional pins supply
      power (+5 V) and connect the ground.Symbolically, a NAND gate can
      also be shown using the OR shape with bubbles on its inputs, and a
      NOR gate can be shown as an AND gate with bubbles on its inputs.
      This reflects the equivalency due to De Morgans law, but it also
      allows a diagram to be read more easily, or a circuit to be mapped
      onto available physical gates in packages easily, since any circuit
      node that has bubbles at both ends can be replaced by a simple
      bubble-less connection and a suitable change of gate. If the NAND is
      drawn as OR with input bubbles, and a NOR as AND with input bubbles,
      this gate substitution occurs automatically in the diagram
      (effectively, bubbles "cancel"). This is commonly seen in real logic
      diagrams - thus the reader must not get into the habit of
      associating the shapes exclusively as OR or AND shapes, but also
      take into account the bubbles at both inputs and outputs in order to
      determine the "true" logic function indicated.

      Two more gates are the exclusive-OR or XOR function and its inverse,
      exclusive-NOR or XNOR. The two input Exclusive-OR is true only when
      the two input values are different, false if they are equal,
      regardless of the value. If there are more than two inputs, the gate
      generates a true at its output if the number of trues at its input
      is odd ([2]). In practice, these gates are built from combinations
      of simpler logic gates.

      XOR INPUT OUTPUT
      A B A XOR B
      0 0 0
      0 1 1
      1 0 1
      1 1 0

      XNOR INPUT OUTPUT
      A B A XNOR B
      0 0 1
      0 1 0
      1 0 0
      1 1 1
    • moralyka
      There are two symbols for OR gates: the military symbol and the rectangular symbol.
      Message 2 of 24 , Feb 4, 2008
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        There are two symbols for OR gates: the 'military' symbol and
        the 'rectangular' symbol.
      • moralyka
        There are two symbols for NOT gates: the military symbol and the rectangular symbol
        Message 3 of 24 , Feb 4, 2008
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          There are two symbols for NOT gates: the 'military' symbol and
          the 'rectangular' symbol
        • moralyka
          There are two symbols for NAND gates: the military symbol and the rectangular symbol.
          Message 4 of 24 , Feb 4, 2008
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            There are two symbols for NAND gates: the 'military' symbol and
            the 'rectangular' symbol.
          • moralyka
            A B C D E F G ( | ) The Sheffer stroke commutes but does not associate. Hence any formal system including the Sheffer stroke must also include a means of
            Message 5 of 24 , Feb 4, 2008
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              A B C D E F G '
              ( | )

              The Sheffer stroke commutes but does not associate. Hence any formal
              system including the Sheffer stroke must also include a means of
              indicating grouping. We shall employ '(' and ')' to this effect.
            • rodriguez_mishikaiko
              Symbols A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617- 12.There are two sets
              Message 6 of 24 , Feb 8, 2008
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                Symbols

                A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in
                accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617-
                12.There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991.
                The "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is
                used for simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is
                sometimes unofficially described as "military", reflecting its
                origin if not its modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based
                on IEC 60617-12, has rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and
                allows representation of a much wider range of devices than is
                possible with the traditional symbols. The IEC's system has been
                adopted by other standards, such as EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and
                BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These
                were added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-
                shape symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not
                preferred, but is not considered to be in contradiction to that
                standard."

                In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The
                need for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape
                symbols are still the predominate style.[citation needed]
              • mhadz_dawal
                Circuit diagram symbols have differed from country to country and have changed over time, but are now to a large extent internationally standardized. Simple
                Message 7 of 24 , Feb 14, 2008
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                  Circuit diagram symbols have differed from country to country and
                  have changed over time, but are now to a large extent
                  internationally standardized. Simple components often had symbols
                  intended to represent some feature of the physical construction of
                  the device. For example, the symbol for a resistor shown here dates
                  back to the days when that component was made from a long piece of
                  wire wrapped in such a manner as to not produce inductance, which
                  would have made it a coil. These wirewound resistors are now used
                  only in high-power applications, smaller resistors being cast from
                  carbon composition (a mixture of carbon and filler) or fabricated as
                  an insulating tube or chip coated with a metal film. The
                  internationally standardized symbol for a resistor is therefore now
                  simplified to an oblong, sometimes with the value in ohms written
                  inside, instead of the zig-zag symbol. A less common symbol is
                  simply a series of peaks on one side of the line representing the
                  conductor, rather than back-and-forth as shown here.

                  Circuit symbols were originally standardised using BSI standard
                  B.S.3939. Which consisted of 21 sections from resistors and
                  capacitors to logic symbols and even a generalised drawing standard
                  of connections and bus line widths.

                  Circuit symbols are standardized, using either ANSI standard Y32 or
                  IEC standard 60617DB (a standard in database format). Different
                  symbols may be used depending on the discipline using the drawing;
                  for example, lighting and power symbols used as part of
                  architectural drawings may be different from symbols for devices
                  used in electronics.
                • mongayaanalyn
                  There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991. The distinctive shape set,
                  Message 8 of 24 , Feb 25, 2008
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                    There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                    ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991. The
                    "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is used for
                    simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is sometimes
                    unofficially described as "military", reflecting its origin if not its
                    modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based on IEC 60617-12, has
                    rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and allows representation
                    of a much wider range of devices than is possible with the traditional
                    symbols. The IEC's system has been adopted by other standards, such as
                    EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                    The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                    describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                    schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                    and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                    counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                    version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These were
                    added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-shape
                    symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not preferred,
                    but is not considered to be in contradiction to that standard."

                    In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                    circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                    and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                    Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The need
                    for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape symbols
                    are still the predominate style.[citation needed]
                  • mhadz_dawal
                    A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617- 12.There are two sets of
                    Message 9 of 24 , Feb 27, 2008
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                      A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in
                      accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617-
                      12.There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                      ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991.
                      The "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is used
                      for simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is sometimes
                      unofficially described as "military", reflecting its origin if not
                      its modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based on IEC 60617-12,
                      has rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and allows
                      representation of a much wider range of devices than is possible with
                      the traditional symbols. The IEC's system has been adopted by other
                      standards, such as EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and BS EN 60617-12:1999
                      in the United Kingdom.

                      The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                      describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                      schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                      and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                      counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                      version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These
                      were added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-
                      shape symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not
                      preferred, but is not considered to be in contradiction to that
                      standard."

                      In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                      circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                      and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                      Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The
                      need for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape
                      symbols are still the predominate style.[citation needed]

                      Type Distinctive shape Rectangular shape Boolean algebra between A &
                      B Truth table
                      AND INPUT OUTPUT
                      A B A AND B
                      0 0 0
                      0 1 0
                      1 0 0
                      1 1 1

                      OR A + B INPUT OUTPUT
                      A B A OR B
                      0 0 0
                      0 1 1
                      1 0 1
                      1 1 1

                      NOT INPUT OUTPUT
                      A NOT A
                      0 1
                      1 0

                      In electronics a NOT gate is more commonly called an inverter. The
                      circle on the symbol is called a bubble, and is generally used in
                      circuit diagrams to indicate an inverted (active-low) input or output.
                      [1][2]
                      NAND INPUT OUTPUT
                      A B A NAND B
                      0 0 1
                      0 1 1
                      1 0 1
                      1 1 0

                      NOR INPUT OUTPUT
                      A B A NOR B
                      0 0 1
                      0 1 0
                      1 0 0
                      1 1 0

                      In practice, the cheapest gate to manufacture is usually the NAND
                      gate. Additionally, Charles Peirce showed that NAND gates alone (as
                      well as NOR gates alone) can be used to reproduce the functions of
                      all the other logic gates.
                      The 7400 chip, containing four NANDs. The two additional pins supply
                      power (+5 V) and connect the ground.Symbolically, a NAND gate can
                      also be shown using the OR shape with bubbles on its inputs, and a
                      NOR gate can be shown as an AND gate with bubbles on its inputs. This
                      reflects the equivalency due to De Morgans law, but it also allows a
                      diagram to be read more easily, or a circuit to be mapped onto
                      available physical gates in packages easily, since any circuit node
                      that has bubbles at both ends can be replaced by a simple bubble-less
                      connection and a suitable change of gate. If the NAND is drawn as OR
                      with input bubbles, and a NOR as AND with input bubbles, this gate
                      substitution occurs automatically in the diagram (effectively,
                      bubbles "cancel"). This is commonly seen in real logic diagrams -
                      thus the reader must not get into the habit of associating the shapes
                      exclusively as OR or AND shapes, but also take into account the
                      bubbles at both inputs and outputs in order to determine the "true"
                      logic function indicated.

                      Two more gates are the exclusive-OR or XOR function and its inverse,
                      exclusive-NOR or XNOR. The two input Exclusive-OR is true only when
                      the two input values are different, false if they are equal,
                      regardless of the value. If there are more than two inputs, the gate
                      generates a true at its output if the number of trues at its input is
                      odd ([2]). In practice, these gates are built from combinations of
                      simpler logic gates.

                      XOR INPUT OUTPUT
                      A B A XOR B
                      0 0 0
                      0 1 1
                      1 0 1
                      1 1 0

                      XNOR INPUT OUTPUT
                      A B A XNOR B
                      0 0 1
                      0 1 0
                      1 0 0
                      1 1 1
                    • nogalesrona
                      There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by ANSI /IEEE
                      Message 10 of 24 , Mar 6 12:08 AM
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                        There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991. The "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is used for simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is sometimes unofficially described as "military", reflecting its origin if not its modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based on IEC 60617-12, has rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and allows representation of a much wider range of devices than is possible with the traditional symbols. The IEC's system has been adopted by other standards, such as EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                        The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984 version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These were added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-shape symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not preferred, but is not considered to be in contradiction to that standard."

                        In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The need for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape symbols are still the predominate style.[citation needed]

                        TypeDistinctive shapeRectangular shapeBoolean algebra between A & BTruth table
                        ANDAND symbolAND symbolA \cdot B
                        INPUTOUTPUT
                        ABA AND B
                        000
                        010
                        100
                        111
                        OROR symbolOR symbolA + B
                        INPUTOUTPUT
                        ABA OR B
                        000
                        011
                        101
                        111
                        NOTNOT symbolNOT symbol\overline{A}
                        INPUTOUTPUT
                        ANOT A
                        01
                        10
                        In electronics a NOT gate is more commonly called an inverter. The circle on the symbol is called a bubble, and is generally used in circuit diagrams to indicate an inverted (active-low) input or output.[1][2]
                        NANDNAND symbolNAND symbol\overline{A \cdot B}
                        INPUTOUTPUT
                        ABA NAND B
                        001
                        011
                        101
                        110
                        NORNOR symbolNOR symbol\overline{A + B}
                        INPUTOUTPUT
                        ABA NOR B
                        001
                        010
                        100
                        110
                        In practice, the cheapest gate to manufacture is usually the NAND gate. Additionally, Charles Peirce showed that NAND gates alone (as well as NOR gates alone) can be used to reproduce the functions of all the other logic gates.
                        The 7400 chip, containing four NANDs. The two additional pins supply power (+5 V) and connect the ground.
                        The 7400 chip, containing four NANDs. The two additional pins supply power (+5 V) and connect the ground.

                        Symbolically, a NAND gate can also be shown using the OR shape with bubbles on its inputs, and a NOR gate can be shown as an AND gate with bubbles on its inputs. This reflects the equivalency due to De Morgans law, but it also allows a diagram to be read more easily, or a circuit to be mapped onto available physical gates in packages easily, since any circuit node that has bubbles at both ends can be replaced by a simple bubble-less connection and a suitable change of gate. If the NAND is drawn as OR with input bubbles, and a NOR as AND with input bubbles, this gate substitution occurs automatically in the diagram (effectively, bubbles "cancel"). This is commonly seen in real logic diagrams - thus the reader must not get into the habit of associating the shapes exclusively as OR or AND shapes, but also take into account the bubbles at both inputs and outputs in order to determine the "true" logic function indicated.

                        Two more gates are the exclusive-OR or XOR function and its inverse, exclusive-NOR or XNOR. The two input Exclusive-OR is true only when the two input values are different, false if they are equal, regardless of the value. If there are more than two inputs, the gate generates a true at its output if the number of trues at its input is odd ([2]). In practice, these gates are built from combinations of simpler logic gates.

                        XORXOR symbolXOR symbolA \oplus B
                        INPUTOUTPUT
                        ABA XOR B
                        000
                        011
                        101
                        110
                        XNORXNOR symbolXNOR symbol\overline{A \oplus B}
                        INPUTOUTPUT
                        ABA XNOR B
                        001
                        010
                        100
                        111
                      • rosaljohnjay
                        Circuit diagram symbols have differed from country to country and have changed over time, but are now to a large extent internationally standardized. Simple
                        Message 11 of 24 , Sep 3, 2008
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                          Circuit diagram symbols have differed from country to country and have
                          changed over time, but are now to a large extent internationally
                          standardized. Simple components often had symbols intended to
                          represent some feature of the physical construction of the device. For
                          example, the symbol for a resistor shown here dates back to the days
                          when that component was made from a long piece of wire wrapped in such
                          a manner as to not produce inductance, which would have made it a
                          coil. These wirewound resistors are now used only in high-power
                          applications, smaller resistors being cast from carbon composition (a
                          mixture of carbon and filler) or fabricated as an insulating tube or
                          chip coated with a metal film. The internationally standardized symbol
                          for a resistor is therefore now simplified to an oblong, sometimes
                          with the value in ohms written inside, instead of the zig-zag symbol.
                          A less common symbol is simply a series of peaks on one side of the
                          line representing the conductor, rather than back-and-forth as shown
                          here.
                        • ventajonah
                          Symbols A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617- 12.There are two sets
                          Message 12 of 24 , Jan 21, 2009
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                            Symbols

                            A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in
                            accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617-
                            12.There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                            ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991.
                            The "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is
                            used for simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is
                            sometimes unofficially described as "military", reflecting its
                            origin if not its modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based
                            on IEC 60617-12, has rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and
                            allows representation of a much wider range of devices than is
                            possible with the traditional symbols. The IEC's system has been
                            adopted by other standards, such as EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and
                            BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                            The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                            describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                            schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                            and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                            counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                            version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These
                            were added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-
                            shape symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not
                            preferred, but is not considered to be in contradiction to that
                            standard."

                            In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                            circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                            and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                            Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The
                            need for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape
                            symbols are still the predominate style.
                          • ervin_2323
                            There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991. The distinctive shape set,
                            Message 13 of 24 , Feb 8, 2009
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                              There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                              ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991.
                              The "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is
                              used for simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is
                              sometimes unofficially described as "military", reflecting its
                              origin if not its modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based
                              on IEC 60617-12, has rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and
                              allows representation of a much wider range of devices than is
                              possible with the traditional symbols. The IEC's system has been
                              adopted by other standards, such as EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and
                              BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                              The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                              describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                              schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                              and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                              counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                              version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These
                              were added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-
                              shape symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not
                              preferred, but is not considered to be in contradiction to that
                              standard."

                              In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                              circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                              and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                              Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The
                              need for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape
                              symbols are still the predominate style.[citation needed]

                              Type Distinctive shape Rectangular shape Boolean algebra between A &
                              B Truth table
                              AND INPUT OUTPUT
                              A B A AND B
                              0 0 0
                              0 1 0
                              1 0 0
                              1 1 1

                              OR A + B INPUT OUTPUT
                              A B A OR B
                              0 0 0
                              0 1 1
                              1 0 1
                              1 1 1

                              NOT INPUT OUTPUT
                              A NOT A
                              0 1
                              1 0

                              In electronics a NOT gate is more commonly called an inverter. The
                              circle on the symbol is called a bubble, and is generally used in
                              circuit diagrams to indicate an inverted (active-low) input or
                              output.[1]
                              NAND INPUT OUTPUT
                              A B A NAND B
                              0 0 1
                              0 1 1
                              1 0 1
                              1 1 0

                              NOR INPUT OUTPUT
                              A B A NOR B
                              0 0 1
                              0 1 0
                              1 0 0
                              1 1 0

                              In practice, the cheapest gate to manufacture is usually the NAND
                              gate. Additionally, Charles Peirce showed that NAND gates alone (as
                              well as NOR gates alone) can be used to reproduce the functions of
                              all the other logic gates.
                              The 7400 chip, containing four NANDs. The two additional pins supply
                              power (+5 V) and connect the ground.Two more gates are the exclusive-
                              OR or XOR function and its inverse, exclusive-NOR or XNOR. The two
                              input Exclusive-OR is true only when the two input values are
                              different, false if they are equal, regardless of the value. If
                              there are more than two inputs, the gate generates a true at its
                              output if the number of trues at its input is odd ([2]). In
                              practice, these gates are built from combinations of simpler logic
                              gates.

                              XOR INPUT OUTPUT
                              A B A XOR B
                              0 0 0
                              0 1 1
                              1 0 1
                              1 1 0

                              XNOR INPUT OUTPUT
                              A B A XNOR B
                              0 0 1
                              0 1 0
                              1 0 0
                              1 1 1



                              [edit] De Morgan equivalent symbols
                              By use of De Morgan's theorem, an AND gate can be turned into an OR
                              gate by inverting the sense of the logic at its inputs and outputs.
                              This leads to a separate ends can be replaced by a simple bubble-
                              less connection and a suitable change of gate. If the NAND is drawn
                              as OR with input bubbles, and a NOR as AND with input bubbles, this
                              gate substitution occurs automatically in the diagram (effectively,
                              bubbles "cancel"). This is commonly seen in real logic diagrams -
                              thus the reader must not get into the habit of associating the
                              shapes exclusively as OR or AND shapes, but also take into account
                              the bubbles
                            • serhabie_16
                              Symbols A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617-12. There are two sets
                              Message 14 of 24 , Feb 9, 2009
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                                Symbols

                                A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in
                                accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617-12.

                                There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                                ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991. The
                                "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is used for
                                simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is sometimes
                                unofficially described as "military", reflecting its origin if not its
                                modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based on IEC 60617-12, has
                                rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and allows representation
                                of a much wider range of devices than is possible with the traditional
                                symbols. The IEC's system has been adopted by other standards, such as
                                EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                                The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                                describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                                schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                                and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                                counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                                version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These were
                                added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-shape
                                symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not preferred,
                                but is not considered to be in contradiction to that standard."

                                In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                                circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                                and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                                Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The need
                                for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape symbols
                                are still the predominate style.
                              • annedejesus16
                                A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617- 12.There are two sets of
                                Message 15 of 24 , Feb 9, 2009
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                                  A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in
                                  accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617-
                                  12.There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                                  ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991.
                                  The "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is
                                  used for simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is
                                  sometimes unofficially described as "military", reflecting its
                                  origin if not its modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based
                                  on IEC 60617-12, has rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and
                                  allows representation of a much wider range of devices than is
                                  possible with the traditional symbols. The IEC's system has been
                                  adopted by other standards, such as EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and
                                  BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                                  The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                                  describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                                  schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                                  and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                                  counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                                  version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These
                                  were added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-
                                  shape symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not
                                  preferred, but is not considered to be in contradiction to that
                                  standard."

                                  In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                                  circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                                  and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                                  Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The
                                  need for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape
                                  symbols are still the predominate style.[citation needed]

                                  Type Distinctive shape Rectangular shape Boolean algebra between A &
                                  B Truth table
                                  AND INPUT OUTPUT
                                  A B A AND B
                                  0 0 0
                                  0 1 0
                                  1 0 0
                                  1 1 1

                                  OR A + B INPUT OUTPUT
                                  A B A OR B
                                  0 0 0
                                  0 1 1
                                  1 0 1
                                  1 1 1

                                  NOT INPUT OUTPUT
                                  A NOT A
                                  0 1
                                  1 0

                                  In electronics a NOT gate is more commonly called an inverter. The
                                  circle on the symbol is called a bubble, and is generally used in
                                  circuit diagrams to indicate an inverted (active-low) input or
                                  output.[1]
                                  NAND INPUT OUTPUT
                                  A B A NAND B
                                  0 0 1
                                  0 1 1
                                  1 0 1
                                  1 1 0

                                  NOR INPUT OUTPUT
                                  A B A NOR B
                                  0 0 1
                                  0 1 0
                                  1 0 0
                                  1 1 0

                                  In practice, the cheapest gate to manufacture is usually the NAND
                                  gate. Additionally, Charles Peirce showed that NAND gates alone (as
                                  well as NOR gates alone) can be used to reproduce the functions of
                                  all the other logic gates.
                                  The 7400 chip, containing four NANDs. The two additional pins supply
                                  power (+5 V) and connect the ground.Two more gates are the exclusive-
                                  OR or XOR function and its inverse, exclusive-NOR or XNOR. The two
                                  input Exclusive-OR is true only when the two input values are
                                  different, false if they are equal, regardless of the value. If
                                  there are more than two inputs, the gate generates a true at its
                                  output if the number of trues at its input is odd ([2]). In
                                  practice, these gates are built from combinations of simpler logic
                                  gates.
                                • annedejesus16
                                  A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617- 12.There are two sets of
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Feb 9, 2009
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    A synchronous 4-bit up/down decade counter symbol (74LS192) in
                                    accordance with ANSI/IEEE Std. 91-1984 and IEC Publication 60617-
                                    12.There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                                    ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991.
                                    The "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is
                                    used for simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is
                                    sometimes unofficially described as "military", reflecting its
                                    origin if not its modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based
                                    on IEC 60617-12, has rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and
                                    allows representation of a much wider range of devices than is
                                    possible with the traditional symbols. The IEC's system has been
                                    adopted by other standards, such as EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and
                                    BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                                    The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                                    describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                                    schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                                    and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                                    counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                                    version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These
                                    were added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-
                                    shape symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not
                                    preferred, but is not considered to be in contradiction to that
                                    standard."

                                    In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                                    circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                                    and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                                    Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The
                                    need for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape
                                    symbols are still the predominate style.[citation needed]

                                    Type Distinctive shape Rectangular shape Boolean algebra between A &
                                    B Truth table
                                    AND INPUT OUTPUT
                                    A B A AND B
                                    0 0 0
                                    0 1 0
                                    1 0 0
                                    1 1 1

                                    OR A + B INPUT OUTPUT
                                    A B A OR B
                                    0 0 0
                                    0 1 1
                                    1 0 1
                                    1 1 1

                                    NOT INPUT OUTPUT
                                    A NOT A
                                    0 1
                                    1 0

                                    In electronics a NOT gate is more commonly called an inverter. The
                                    circle on the symbol is called a bubble, and is generally used in
                                    circuit diagrams to indicate an inverted (active-low) input or
                                    output.[1]
                                    NAND INPUT OUTPUT
                                    A B A NAND B
                                    0 0 1
                                    0 1 1
                                    1 0 1
                                    1 1 0

                                    NOR INPUT OUTPUT
                                    A B A NOR B
                                    0 0 1
                                    0 1 0
                                    1 0 0
                                    1 1 0

                                    In practice, the cheapest gate to manufacture is usually the NAND
                                    gate. Additionally, Charles Peirce showed that NAND gates alone (as
                                    well as NOR gates alone) can be used to reproduce the functions of
                                    all the other logic gates.
                                    The 7400 chip, containing four NANDs. The two additional pins supply
                                    power (+5 V) and connect the ground.Two more gates are the exclusive-
                                    OR or XOR function and its inverse, exclusive-NOR or XNOR. The two
                                    input Exclusive-OR is true only when the two input values are
                                    different, false if they are equal, regardless of the value. If
                                    there are more than two inputs, the gate generates a true at its
                                    output if the number of trues at its input is odd ([2]). In
                                    practice, these gates are built from combinations of simpler logic
                                    gates.
                                  • alansobrevinas
                                    There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991. The distinctive shape set,
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Feb 17, 2009
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                                      ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991. The
                                      "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is used for
                                      simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is sometimes
                                      unofficially described as "military", reflecting its origin if not its
                                      modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based on IEC 60617-12, has
                                      rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and allows representation
                                      of a much wider range of devices than is possible with the traditional
                                      symbols. The IEC's system has been adopted by other standards, such as
                                      EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                                      The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                                      describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                                      schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                                      and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                                      counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                                      version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These were
                                      added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-shape
                                      symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not preferred,
                                      but is not considered to be in contradiction to that standard."

                                      In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                                      circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                                      and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                                      Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The need
                                      for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape symbols
                                      are still the predominate style.[citation needed]
                                      Type Distinctive shape Rectangular shape Boolean algebra between
                                      A & B Truth table
                                      AND AND symbol AND symbol A \cdot B
                                      INPUT OUTPUT
                                      A B A AND B
                                      0 0 0
                                      0 1 0
                                      1 0 0
                                      1 1 1
                                      OR OR symbol OR symbol A + B
                                      INPUT OUTPUT
                                      A B A OR B
                                      0 0 0
                                      0 1 1
                                      1 0 1
                                      1 1 1
                                      NOT NOT symbol NOT symbol \overline{A}
                                      INPUT OUTPUT
                                      A NOT A
                                      0 1
                                      1 0
                                      In electronics a NOT gate is more commonly called an inverter. The
                                      circle on the symbol is called a bubble, and is generally used in
                                      circuit diagrams to indicate an inverted (active-low) input or output.[1]
                                      NAND NAND symbol NAND symbol \overline{A \cdot B}
                                      INPUT OUTPUT
                                      A B A NAND B
                                      0 0 1
                                      0 1 1
                                      1 0 1
                                      1 1 0
                                      NOR NOR symbol NOR symbol \overline{A + B}
                                      INPUT OUTPUT
                                      A B A NOR B
                                      0 0 1
                                      0 1 0
                                      1 0 0
                                      1 1 0
                                      In practice, the cheapest gate to manufacture is usually the NAND
                                      gate. Additionally, Charles Peirce showed that NAND gates alone (as
                                      well as NOR gates alone) can be used to reproduce the functions of all
                                      the other logic gates.
                                      The 7400 chip, containing four NANDs. The two additional pins supply
                                      power (+5 V) and connect the ground.

                                      Two more gates are the exclusive-OR or XOR function and its inverse,
                                      exclusive-NOR or XNOR. The two input Exclusive-OR is true only when
                                      the two input values are different, false if they are equal,
                                      regardless of the value. If there are more than two inputs, the gate
                                      generates a true at its output if the number of trues at its input is
                                      odd ([2]). In practice, these gates are built from combinations of
                                      simpler logic gates.
                                      XOR XOR symbol XOR symbol A \oplus B
                                      INPUT OUTPUT
                                      A B A XOR B
                                      0 0 0
                                      0 1 1
                                      1 0 1
                                      1 1 0
                                      XNOR XNOR symbol XNOR symbol \overline{A \oplus B}
                                      INPUT OUTPUT
                                      A B A XNOR B
                                      0 0 1
                                      0 1 0
                                      1 0 0
                                      1 1 1
                                    • ayie_pinxcess16
                                      There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991. The distinctive shape set,
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Feb 17, 2009
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                                        ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991. The
                                        "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is used for
                                        simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is sometimes
                                        unofficially described as "military", reflecting its origin if not its
                                        modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based on IEC 60617-12, has
                                        rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and allows representation
                                        of a much wider range of devices than is possible with the traditional
                                        symbols. The IEC's system has been adopted by other standards, such as
                                        EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                                        The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                                        describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                                        schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                                        and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                                        counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                                        version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These were
                                        added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-shape
                                        symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not preferred,
                                        but is not considered to be in contradiction to that standard."

                                        In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                                        circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                                        and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                                        Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The need
                                        for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape symbols
                                        are still the predominate style.[citation needed]
                                      • jovansanglay
                                        There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991. The distinctive shape set,
                                        Message 19 of 24 , Feb 25, 2009
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          There are two sets of symbols in common use, both now defined by
                                          ANSI/IEEE Std 91-1984 and its supplement ANSI/IEEE Std 91a-1991.
                                          The "distinctive shape" set, based on traditional schematics, is
                                          used for simple drawings and is quicker to draw by hand. It is
                                          sometimes unofficially described as "military", reflecting its
                                          origin if not its modern usage. The "rectangular shape" set, based
                                          on IEC 60617-12, has rectangular outlines for all types of gate, and
                                          allows representation of a much wider range of devices than is
                                          possible with the traditional symbols. The IEC's system has been
                                          adopted by other standards, such as EN 60617-12:1999 in Europe and
                                          BS EN 60617-12:1999 in the United Kingdom.

                                          The goal of IEEE Std 91-1984 was to provide a uniform method of
                                          describing the complex logic functions of digital circuits with
                                          schematic symbols. These functions were more complex than simple AND
                                          and OR gates. They could be medium scale circuits such as a 4-bit
                                          counter to a large scale circuits such as a microprocessor. The 1984
                                          version did not include the "distinctive shape" symbols.[1] These
                                          were added to the 1991 supplement with this note: "The distinctive-
                                          shape symbol is, according to IEC Publication 617, Part 12, not
                                          preferred, but is not considered to be in contradiction to that
                                          standard."

                                          In the 1980s, schematics were the predominant method to design both
                                          circuit boards and custom ICs known as gate arrays. Today custom ICs
                                          and the field-programmable gate array are typically designed with
                                          Hardware Description Languages (HDL) such as Verilog or VHDL. The
                                          need for complex logic symbols has diminished and distinctive shape
                                          symbols are still the predominate style
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