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Lairs

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  • margmasson
    Thanks to all who replied to my question re lair . Thank you Alison for a great explanation. I guess we would call it a family burial plot here in
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 27 12:07 AM
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      Thanks to all who replied to my question re "lair". Thank you Alison for a great explanation. I guess we would call it a family burial plot here in Australia.Are lairs still used? where does the word originate? Is there a limit to the number of burials in any one lair? Would a person need to be wealthy to purchase one?. I am curious because I came across a number of my late husband's family, including his paternal grandmother, in a lair record. There were others there too. Is it likely these are also family members? Perhaps in laws or grandchildren?
      Marg
    • Henderson, Roy
      A lair is nothing special in itself Marg. It s simply a section of ground very roughly 2.1m by 0.8m (and those sizes are just to give you an idea - they are by
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 27 3:16 AM
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        A lair is nothing special in itself Marg. It's simply a section of
        ground very roughly 2.1m by 0.8m (and those sizes are just to give you
        an idea - they are by no means exact).



        The accepted capacity these days for modern burials is usually three
        coffins with the deepest at about 2m below ground level. A lair would
        probably cost about 350 GBP or 700 AUD but again that figure would
        depend on the actual cemetery or burial ground.



        For lairs which may have originally started in the 17th C then the
        burial record can list 10 or more in a single plot but how this was
        achieved I don't know - perhaps others on the list can explain.



        Some families would purchase adjacent plots - and still do - to provide
        a larger burial area which they could mark off with a kerb boundary or
        erect a larger memorial on. For example, a friend of mine recently
        purchased 3 adjacent lairs and has started with the middle lair.



        With regard to the family lair you mention, it is almost certain that
        the other burials will be family members UNLESS the lair is designated
        as common ground and was provided - in that case, the other burials are
        unlikely to be related and will simply be those who died without means
        or relatives.



        Roy







        ________________________________

        From: Peterhead@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Peterhead@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of margmasson
        Sent: 27 July 2009 08:08
        To: Peterhead@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Peterhead] Lairs





        Thanks to all who replied to my question re "lair". Thank you Alison for
        a great explanation. I guess we would call it a family burial plot here
        in Australia.Are lairs still used? where does the word originate? Is
        there a limit to the number of burials in any one lair? Would a person
        need to be wealthy to purchase one?. I am curious because I came across
        a number of my late husband's family, including his paternal
        grandmother, in a lair record. There were others there too. Is it likely
        these are also family members? Perhaps in laws or grandchildren?
        Marg





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      • C & J Hinricks
        I have one family lair in St Peters Cemetery in Peterhead that I know has 12 in it. The burials were between 1802 and 1897. In 1860 twin babies were buried
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 27 2:40 PM
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          I have one family lair in St Peters Cemetery in Peterhead that I know has 12 in it. The burials were between 1802 and 1897. In 1860 twin babies were buried 3 days apart and in 1897 2 adults were buried less than 6 months apart. I don't think that would happen these days. Maybe lots were able to fit in the same lair as bodies were wrapped rather than in wooden coffins. My knowledge of history is not good enough to say when wooden coffins became the norm., must look that up.
          I was lucky to have one day in Peterhead to visit the town and cemetery, should have been more but ill health in the family meant we had to return to London quickly. The sun was shining the sea was sparkling so a pleasant place to visit and read the old memorial inscriptions. The Registrar of BDM was very helpful as was the lady working in the Museum and the man in charge of the cemetery upkeep went out of his way to help and inform us. Unfortunately the Family Research Centre was not open that day and we were unable to return the following morning when the volunteers were working there so I was not able to check on other members of the family who are probably buried in the same cemetery.
          Janet Hinricks
          in a very cold New Zealand


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        • bty20501509
          I have 3 family lairs in St Peter s one with 14 burials in it,another with only 4 and yet another with 6. What little I know on the subject - Presume the land
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 27 3:37 PM
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            I have 3 family lairs in St Peter's one with 14 burials in it,another with only 4 and yet another with 6.
            What little I know on the subject -
            Presume the land belonged to Merchant Maiden Company and would have been bought from same.
            Circa 1940's the practice was to leave a couple of inches of soil above last burial then use an impliment shaped like a giant wooden potato masher to pound down lair prior to next interment.
            Infants tended to be buried diagonally.
            Records from St Peter's have notation on far right which I believe to be depth.
            Constitiution St. Cemetery lair in 1920 was 8 x 3 feet and cost 3 Pounds 10 Shillings to buy from Edinburgh Merchant Company

            Hope this helps somebody!
          • margmasson
            Hello All, Thanks for all the info about lairs . I have found my notes on the lair containing the burials of who I believe are several members of my husbands
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 28 2:37 AM
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              Hello All,
              Thanks for all the info about "lairs". I have found my notes on the lair containing the burials of who I believe are several members of my husbands family. It is Peterhead Old Kirkyard.One of the "tenents" is Elizabeth Masson or Sedman, my late husbands paternal grandmother. She wasbornElizabeth Thomson (Lizzie) Masson abt 1886 Her parents Andrew Masson & Christian Hird. In 1905 she was living at 8 York St Peterhead when her son Alexander was born. This was probably her parents home. Alex son, my late husband was born there too in 1934. I don't know how long the family lived there before moving to Aberdeen. My husband came to Australia 1958. His parents and sister,brother and their families followed later.
              Marg
            • William Leslie
              Hello CJ; The Family History Society of Buchan (Peterhead) has a CD with details and pictures of all the gravestones in St Peter s Cemetery for a reasonable
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 28 4:18 AM
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                Hello CJ;
                The Family History Society of Buchan (Peterhead) has a CD with details and pictures of all the gravestones in St Peter's Cemetery for a reasonable price. anneallan@...
                Regards
                William Leslie

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: C & J Hinricks
                To: Peterhead@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, July 27, 2009 5:40 PM
                Subject: Re: [Peterhead] Lairs


                I have one family lair in St Peters Cemetery in Peterhead that I know has 12 in it. The burials were between 1802 and 1897. In 1860 twin babies were buried 3 days apart and in 1897 2 adults were buried less than 6 months apart. I don't think that would happen these days. Maybe lots were able to fit in the same lair as bodies were wrapped rather than in wooden coffins. My knowledge of history is not good enough to say when wooden coffins became the norm., must look that up.
                I was lucky to have one day in Peterhead to visit the town and cemetery, should have been more but ill health in the family meant we had to return to London quickly. The sun was shining the sea was sparkling so a pleasant place to visit and read the old memorial inscriptions. The Registrar of BDM was very helpful as was the lady working in the Museum and the man in charge of the cemetery upkeep went out of his way to help and inform us. Unfortunately the Family Research Centre was not open that day and we were unable to return the following morning when the volunteers were working there so I was not able to check on other members of the family who are probably buried in the same cemetery.
                Janet Hinricks
                in a very cold New Zealand


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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              • Ian Robertson
                The Buchan Family History Society ( http://www.fhsb.org.uk/html/links.html ) has access to some terrific CD s listing these buried in Peterhead
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 28 10:39 AM
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                  The Buchan Family History Society ( http://www.fhsb.org.uk/html/links.html ) has access to some terrific CD's listing these buried in Peterhead Cemeteries, along with pictures of the tombstones. I used it to find many members of my ancestors. The neat things is the Scots were so organized about who went where. Friends might be included in a lair, but black sheep were often buried in another lair!


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