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Re: [Peterhead] Farm Servants; Reply from Ray Hennessy; J thomson reply

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  • jsethomson@aol.com
    Hi Ray: I could not agree with you more about our ancestors and their lives. There was nothing demeaning in what they did. In fact, both my grandfather
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 13, 2006
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      Hi Ray: I could not agree with you more about our ancestors and their
      lives. There was nothing demeaning in what they did. In fact, both my
      grandfather and ggrandmother were admirably well suited for making good in the pioneer
      life in both Ontario and the midwest USA. Any good farm servant ploughman
      could make it in any agricultural land whether Ontario, New Zealand or
      Australia...and they did. It is surprising how so many of them came through with so
      little bitterness...even though they did not ever want to experience the great
      social gaps and slights again to which they were exposed in the Old World.
      Things were the worst in this respect on the larger farms that developed in the
      Northeast.....I have just sent a copy of an 1861 Angus farm census to relatives
      to show them the ultimate social gaps that existed on a 500 acre arable farm
      in one of its parishes. Four men in a "Bothy" where they made their own
      meals;
      Two young Highland girls in another womens "bothy"....they worked as hard as
      any men but for about half pay. The local girls worked in the master's
      house...and very hard but still above the Highland girls in status. There are so
      many stories...my ggrandfather had no father so you can imagine his start.

      Thank you again for your remarks and super understanding of 19th cent.
      Scotland.

      Best Regards. Jim Thomson


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Michael Brock
      Hi Jim, Ray and Others You talk of grand and great grand parents as servants. My mother was orphaned at age 9 years and, with her 2 older sisters, was trained
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 18, 2006
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        Hi Jim, Ray and Others

        You talk of grand and great grand parents as servants.

        My mother was orphaned at age 9 years and, with her 2 older sisters, was
        trained at a "domestic school". All 3 girls later emigrated to Australia,
        two under the care of the Salvation Army in 1927, when they chartered a
        vessel (White Star Liner "Vedic") to bring young boys and girls out to work
        on the farms and in the houses. It probably offered a far better opportunity
        than they had back in England at the time. My mother always took pride in
        the work she performed, she never felt demeaned, but she did comment that
        she had been trained in "upstairs" work!! My mother also commented on the
        wonderful life she had in the early days here in Australia.

        My ggrandfather emigrated from Scotland where the family were crofters.
        After coming here he commented "After that I called no man 'sir'" And the
        early crofters were snapped up quickly by the earlier farmers because of
        their farming skills.

        My mother only pased away in 2000 so the days of "service", so perhaps
        because we are a younger country than USA in settlement, this "service" is
        closer to home here.

        Best Regards

        Michael
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <jsethomson@...>
        To: <Peterhead@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, February 14, 2006 9:05 AM
        Subject: Re: [Peterhead] Farm Servants; Reply from Ray Hennessy; J thomson
        reply


        > Hi Ray: I could not agree with you more about our ancestors and their
        > lives. There was nothing demeaning in what they did. In fact, both my
        > grandfather and ggrandmother were admirably well suited for making good in
        > the pioneer
        > life in both Ontario and the midwest USA. Any good farm servant ploughman
        > could make it in any agricultural land whether Ontario, New Zealand or
        > Australia...and they did. It is surprising how so many of them came
        > through with so
        > little bitterness...even though they did not ever want to experience the
        > great
        > social gaps and slights again to which they were exposed in the Old World.
        > Things were the worst in this respect on the larger farms that developed
        > in the
        > Northeast.....I have just sent a copy of an 1861 Angus farm census to
        > relatives
        > to show them the ultimate social gaps that existed on a 500 acre arable
        > farm
        > in one of its parishes. Four men in a "Bothy" where they made their own
        > meals;
        > Two young Highland girls in another womens "bothy"....they worked as hard
        > as
        > any men but for about half pay. The local girls worked in the master's
        > house...and very hard but still above the Highland girls in status.
        > There are so
        > many stories...my ggrandfather had no father so you can imagine his start.
        >
        > Thank you again for your remarks and super understanding of 19th cent.
        > Scotland.
        >
        > Best Regards. Jim Thomson
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > Peterhead Genealogy at http://users.bigpond.net.au/phdgen/
        >
        > To unsubscribe send a messaged to: Peterhead-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Ray Hennessy
        Hi folks Sheena s ggparents were a mixed bunch, including tailors, a shopkeeper, a grieve, a police sergeant, & assorted servants: agricultural and domestic.
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 18, 2006
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          Hi folks

          Sheena's ggparents were a mixed bunch, including tailors, a
          shopkeeper, a grieve, a police sergeant, & assorted servants:
          agricultural and domestic. None of them were demeaned by
          their level in the local hierarchy and many showed determined
          independence, but it is interesting when one gets one's
          children's view.

          One of our sons said, why don't we have anyone famous in
          our tree? To which his mother pointed out: our ancestors
          did a really tough job in the 18-19th centuries, creating
          worthwhile agricultural land out of the primitive landscape
          and making it the lovely county it is today; and just think:
          by their hard work you have all had the opportunities now
          to go to university, get well-paid jobs and travel the world.

          I think he suddenly realised that there just might have been
          different conditions in those days and can now understand
          why we are so keen to get to know those hardy and brave
          forebears who did so much for us all. We are very much in
          awe of them and do this as much to honour their unknown
          memories as to find our own roots.

          End of sermon!!

          Best wishes to all

          Ray

          PS To be fair, we are trying to confirm a link into the Gordon
          line roughly at the time of Lord Byron, but that's another story.


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Michael Brock" <mrbgen@...>
          To: <Peterhead@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, March 18, 2006 8:04 AM
          Subject: Re: [Peterhead] Farm Servants; Reply from Ray Hennessy; J
          thomson reply


          > Hi Jim, Ray and Others
          >
          > You talk of grand and great grand parents as servants.
          >
          > My mother was orphaned at age 9 years and, with her 2 older sisters,
          > was
          > trained at a "domestic school". All 3 girls later emigrated to
          > Australia,
          > two under the care of the Salvation Army in 1927, when they chartered
          > a
          > vessel (White Star Liner "Vedic") to bring young boys and girls out
          > to work
          > on the farms and in the houses. It probably offered a far better
          > opportunity
          > than they had back in England at the time. My mother always took
          > pride in
          > the work she performed, she never felt demeaned, but she did comment
          > that
          > she had been trained in "upstairs" work!! My mother also commented on
          > the
          > wonderful life she had in the early days here in Australia.
          >
          > My ggrandfather emigrated from Scotland where the family were
          > crofters.
          > After coming here he commented "After that I called no man 'sir'" And
          > the
          > early crofters were snapped up quickly by the earlier farmers because
          > of
          > their farming skills.
          >
          > My mother only pased away in 2000 so the days of "service", so perhaps
          > because we are a younger country than USA in settlement, this
          > "service" is
          > closer to home here.
          >
          > Best Regards
          >
          > Michael
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: <jsethomson@...>
          > To: <Peterhead@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Tuesday, February 14, 2006 9:05 AM
          > Subject: Re: [Peterhead] Farm Servants; Reply from Ray Hennessy; J
          > thomson
          > reply
          >
          >
          >> Hi Ray: I could not agree with you more about our ancestors and
          >> their
          >> lives. There was nothing demeaning in what they did. In fact, both
          >> my
          >> grandfather and ggrandmother were admirably well suited for making
          >> good in
          >> the pioneer
          >> life in both Ontario and the midwest USA. Any good farm servant
          >> ploughman
          >> could make it in any agricultural land whether Ontario, New Zealand
          >> or
          >> Australia...and they did. It is surprising how so many of them came
          >> through with so
          >> little bitterness...even though they did not ever want to experience
          >> the
          >> great
          >> social gaps and slights again to which they were exposed in the Old
          >> World.
          >> Things were the worst in this respect on the larger farms that
          >> developed
          >> in the
          >> Northeast.....I have just sent a copy of an 1861 Angus farm census to
          >> relatives
          >> to show them the ultimate social gaps that existed on a 500 acre
          >> arable
          >> farm
          >> in one of its parishes. Four men in a "Bothy" where they made their
          >> own
          >> meals;
          >> Two young Highland girls in another womens "bothy"....they worked as
          >> hard
          >> as
          >> any men but for about half pay. The local girls worked in the
          >> master's
          >> house...and very hard but still above the Highland girls in status.
          >> There are so
          >> many stories...my ggrandfather had no father so you can imagine his
          >> start.
          >>
          >> Thank you again for your remarks and super understanding of 19th
          >> cent.
          >> Scotland.
          >>
          >> Best Regards. Jim Thomson
          >>
          >>
          >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> Peterhead Genealogy at http://users.bigpond.net.au/phdgen/
          >>
          >> To unsubscribe send a messaged to:
          >> Peterhead-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >>
          >> Yahoo! Groups Links
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Peterhead Genealogy at http://users.bigpond.net.au/phdgen/
          >
          > To unsubscribe send a messaged to:
          > Peterhead-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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