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Re: [Peterhead] Digest Number 660

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  • James D. Mitchell
    I was at school in Peterhead during the war and reminiscing about the Birnie Bridge , I remember going over the water on a lovely Sunday afternoon and
    Message 1 of 6 , May 5 10:46 AM
      I was at school in Peterhead during the war and reminiscing about the Birnie
      Bridge , I remember going over the water on a lovely Sunday afternoon and
      wandering over the sand dunes towards the Teashop, and coming across several
      groups of Fishermen in their Sunday dress, playing Housey-housey.
      Durno
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <Peterhead@yahoogroups.com>
      To: <Peterhead@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: 04 May 2002 06:12
      Subject: [Peterhead] Digest Number 660


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      > There is 1 message in this issue.
      >
      > Topics in this digest:
      >
      > 1. Photos
      > From: "fisherquine" <Mmm16dav@...>
      >
      >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Fri, 03 May 2002 20:50:13 -0000
      > From: "fisherquine" <Mmm16dav@...>
      > Subject: Photos
      >
      >
      > Have posted photos which may be on interest. The old Birnie Bridge -
      > someone was asking about it. You had to pay a half penny to get
      > across. On a fine summer's day we used to swim! Picnics "o'er the
      > watter" in the late 40's early 50's consisted of kippers and tatties
      > done on a paraffin stove and an ashet of cold rice with raisins
      > cooked in the oven the night before. We used to spend all day there
      > from 9am to 9pm. The summers were warmer then!
      >
      > The Guiding Light went to Yarmouth for the Autumn season. My father
      > was about 16 at this time- his young brother is beside him. His
      > sister is one of the gutting lassies. She started gutting when she
      > was 14. She has deep gougesto this day on her wrists where the rough
      > salt burned into her skin. She was 90 years old in January.
      >
      > Margie
      >
      >
      >
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    • Mmm16dav@aol.com
      They had to play over there as it would have been frowned at home. My father s mother said - He played bad man s cards and on a Sunday too - that compounded
      Message 2 of 6 , May 5 11:35 AM
        They had to play over there as it would have been frowned at home. My
        father's mother said - He played "bad man's cards" and on a Sunday too -
        that compounded the felony!

        When we went o'er the watter for picnics we went to the back of the tearooms
        - there was a small window there and we had a kettle filled with boiling
        water for a penny - old one of course.

        Margie


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • jcka2002
        I may be starting an argument here but the game that they were playin ower i wattir wis Pitch n Toss. There was a well known school that operated there on a
        Message 3 of 6 , May 5 3:35 PM
          I may be starting an argument here but the game that they were playin
          ower i wattir wis Pitch n Toss. There was a well known school that
          operated there on a sunday.
          Jim Adams
        • Mmm16dav@aol.com
          No argument - just a difference of years! My Dad played both as he taught his grandsons how to play pitch and toss when they were only 10 and 11 - one now 41
          Message 4 of 6 , May 6 2:14 AM
            No argument - just a difference of years! My Dad played both as he taught his
            grandsons how to play pitch and toss when they were only 10 and 11 - one now
            41 the other 39. He used his knife which of course was always wickedly sharp
            on our lawn! He had as big a row as the boys as he should have known better.
            Fishermen always had very sharp knives hence the game.

            Earlier however before he was married he used to go over and play cards -
            housey wasn't the only game they played. He said his uncles John and Jimmy
            took him over. When Jimmy went home he put the cards in his brother's pocket.
            When they were found he allowed his brother Peter to get the blame! Thats
            where the bad man's cards story comes from! Are you reading Bruce?

            I think the difference is in years not ardument - nice to have stirred some
            meories. Did everyone manage to access the photos?

            Warmest Regards

            Margie


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Linda Adam
            Can you please tell me the URL to view the photos. I couldn t find them Linda ... ADVERTISEMENT ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 6 , May 6 11:27 AM
              Can you please tell me the URL to view the photos. I couldn't find them
              Linda

              Mmm16dav@... wrote:

              >
              >
              > No argument - just a difference of years! My Dad played both as he
              > taught his
              > grandsons how to play pitch and toss when they were only 10 and 11 -
              > one now
              > 41 the other 39. He used his knife which of course was always wickedly
              > sharp
              > on our lawn! He had as big a row as the boys as he should have known
              > better.
              > Fishermen always had very sharp knives hence the game.
              >
              > Earlier however before he was married he used to go over and play
              > cards -
              > housey wasn't the only game they played. He said his uncles John and
              > Jimmy
              > took him over. When Jimmy went home he put the cards in his brother's
              > pocket.
              > When they were found he allowed his brother Peter to get the blame!
              > Thats
              > where the bad man's cards story comes from! Are you reading Bruce?
              >
              > I think the difference is in years not ardument - nice to have stirred
              > some
              > meories. Did everyone manage to access the photos?
              >
              > Warmest Regards
              >
              > Margie
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Bruce Milne
              I read you loud and clear, kiddo. Me peer aul Fither gettin the blame. Och, the shame of it. Is the game you call housey actually hossenpfeffer a game
              Message 6 of 6 , May 6 11:44 AM
                I read you loud and clear, kiddo. Me peer aul' Fither gettin the blame.
                Och, the shame of it.

                Is the game you call housey actually hossenpfeffer a game similar to
                euchre? I used to play that with my dad oh so many long years ago.

                Warm regards, Bruce
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