Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: New Questions...

Expand Messages
  • patrick.devoe
    Bert, The reason I ask this question was because of the cocanut substrate I used in her cage, it came in a brick form and it had to be soaked in warm water
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 15, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Bert,
      The reason I ask this question was because of the cocanut substrate I used in her cage, it came in a brick form and it had to be soaked in warm water before it would crumble apart.It startd growing mold and I had to replace the substrate. Potting soil with a mixture of peatmoss, this seems to be the best. I was worried the little T would be fast but it was very,very slow. I guess when it comes to questions its easy to ask questions but to know from experience is quie rewarding. No need to apologize,I agree with you on handling young tarantulas.

      Take care,

      Patrick



      --- In Pet_Tarantulas@yahoogroups.com, "BertW" <Bert.H.Wright@...> wrote:
      >
      > Patrick:
      >
      > Thanks again - I know that you've been around and have had T's for years as I have traded emails with you before. Please accept my apology if I seemingly was providing redundant information. Wee tarantulas (young-uns, spiderlings or 'Slings' as they're often referred to) are less intimidating than adult-sized tarantulas, but there are drawbacks to handling them, as well. Injury is the major concern. When they're little (nickel size and less), they molt more often and possibly more vulnerable to injury. Again, I would coax it to my hand. What you may find is that they will scurry out of eyesight and play hide-and-seek. That is, careful, you can lose them. Although the Brachypelma smithi or Mexican Red Knee Tarantula is not necessarily a fast tarantula, when they're small, they can surprise you (sometimes) - not like baboon tarantulas, by any means, but they're all different. Anyway, another concern with small tarantulas is that sometimes folks will put them in a cage too large, making it more difficult for them to catch food, maintain humdidity, etc. I sometimes will go from a pill bottle, to a baby-food jar, to a larger jar or container and then to their larger habitats as they're pre-adult to full size. It is merely a suggestion. Good luck with your red knee, they're fairly slow growing, but certainly a longlived species (30 years or more for some female Mexican Red Knees). They were huge (available) in the market years ago, but now they're not as easy to find (unless you go to Kelly Swift as he has a HUGE Breeding female and she is a beaut).
      >
      > Best regards,
      >
      > Bert Wright
      > Fellow Tarantula Keeper/Enthusiast
      >
      > --- In Pet_Tarantulas@yahoogroups.com, "patrick.devoe" <patrick.devoe@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Wow thanks thats some good stuff for newbees.
      > > I guess my question is at what size is ok to handel as my T is the size of a nickel. I'm 41 and I have had tarantulas for years and own the bible of Tarantula books as you mentioned. I haven't held a baby tarantula as I belive they would move quite quickly,but I don't know perhaps you can answer this question.
      > > I'll tell you this my wife has no fear of any tarantula, however she is scared of the crikets. She will hand me anyone of my tarantulas, to her there just bugs to me its the most exciting thing I can imagine
      > > I enjoy my pets and talk to them,just needed some info on the slings and how they react to human contact.
      > >
      > > Thanks
      > >
      > > Patrick
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In Pet_Tarantulas@yahoogroups.com, "BertW" <Bert.H.Wright@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Patrick:
      > > >
      > > > Thanks for your Post. Question: How big, or what size is your Brachypelma smithi Mexican Red Knee Tarantula? Handling is something that you have to take from pet to pet as they (tarantulas) are all different. Yes, there are some that will have no part of it. They are really not different than any other animal and that is: If left alone for long periods of time with little 'interaction' (with cage cleaning, watering, feeding, etc.), they can tend to be less familiar with you and thereby, less receptive to you. Animals left in the wild - such as feril cats - over time will get more wild. Have you ever tried to even pet a feril cat? They will not have any part of it. I am in no way trying to compare a cat to a tarantula, but the basic attitude is what I am referring to.
      > > >
      > > > The Mexican Red knee is an excellent pet species as they are beautifully colored, long-lived and fairly receptive to handling - they are not as easily handled as a Grammastola Rosea or Chilean rose hair, in my opinion, as they can be a bit skittish and readily flick urticating bristles if bothered. The point that most people need to understand with handling any tarantula (and there are many keepers who will NOT handle their tarantulas for the very reason) is not what they will do to you, but what you can and might do to them - they cannot suffer a fall to the floor generally as this will invariably rupture their opisthosoma and kill them - there are exceptions, but not usually. My put on that is keep ALL handling close to the floor. Tarantulas can bite, they will bite, but normally they are receptive and will not bite. People are often bitten when they MIS-handle a tarantula. Until you get more familiar with handling and tarantulas in general, do not try to just grab your tarantula and pick it up - chances are great that you will be bitten - some people are ok with just grabbing a tarantula, but this is normally with a pet that is very familair with you and you to them. Until you become more familiar with tarantulas and handling thereof, try coaxing the tarantula to your hand or your forearm. Use a free hand to block or divert them. Know the red flags of handling and tarantula keeping - if and when a tarantula raises their forelegs - keep away, they will bite if provoked in this mood. Also, kicking urticating bristles with their hind legs is a sign of leave me alone - however, sometimes this can be just a natural reaction and will allow handling - but raised forelegs - leave that tarantula be for the moment. I recommend Stanley and Marguerite Schultz's Tarantula Keeper's Guide as a MUST-OWN reference for all Tarantula Keepers - there are tips on handling by the PROs in the Guide. Check on the internet for other tips on hamdling. Just be aware - handling a tarantula is DANGEROUS to the tarantula and you must take all precautions necessary NOT to injure your tarantula by picking it up. Patrick, my best advice is that TIME and frequent interaction is how best to get to know your tarantula, and for them to know you. Avoid keeping them isolated for extended periods of time and keep them where you will know when they need water, fed, or to be left alone when they are approaching molt - that is another tip - try to avoid handling a tarantula near molt - that is just my opinion. Have fun and enjoy your tarantula Keeping Experiences. Thanks Patrick.
      > > >
      > > > Bert Wright
      > > > Fellow Tarantula Keeper/Enthusiast.
      > > >
      > > > --- In Pet_Tarantulas@yahoogroups.com, "patrick.devoe" <patrick.devoe@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Now that my new B. Smithi has become acquainted to her new home, how should I get her acquainted to me?
      > > > >
      > > > > Next I'm going to buy The Brazilian Black "Grammostola pulchra" due to the loss of my sling almost a year ago.
      > > > >
      > > > > Patrick
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • BertW
      Patrick: Thank you for the feedback. I suppose I may have been speaking in general terms on the speed of slings. In hindsight, some of the slow growers and
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 15, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Patrick:

        Thank you for the feedback. I suppose I may have been speaking in general terms on the speed of slings. In hindsight, some of the slow growers and longer lived may be a bit slow as they grow - then again, temperature, temperament and other factors play a part too. As far as substrate, I have wrestled with the best mixture for years - I still have lots of coconut fiber around in some cages - but I have a Peat moss, organic potting soil-mix that seems o.k. for the time being. Please continue to keep us posted on your keeping experiences. Thanks Patrick.

        Bert Wright
        Fellow Tarantula Keeper/Enthusiast

        --- In Pet_Tarantulas@yahoogroups.com, "patrick.devoe" <patrick.devoe@...> wrote:
        >
        > Bert,
        > The reason I ask this question was because of the cocanut substrate I used in her cage, it came in a brick form and it had to be soaked in warm water before it would crumble apart.It startd growing mold and I had to replace the substrate. Potting soil with a mixture of peatmoss, this seems to be the best. I was worried the little T would be fast but it was very,very slow. I guess when it comes to questions its easy to ask questions but to know from experience is quie rewarding. No need to apologize,I agree with you on handling young tarantulas.
        >
        > Take care,
        >
        > Patrick
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In Pet_Tarantulas@yahoogroups.com, "BertW" <Bert.H.Wright@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Patrick:
        > >
        > > Thanks again - I know that you've been around and have had T's for years as I have traded emails with you before. Please accept my apology if I seemingly was providing redundant information. Wee tarantulas (young-uns, spiderlings or 'Slings' as they're often referred to) are less intimidating than adult-sized tarantulas, but there are drawbacks to handling them, as well. Injury is the major concern. When they're little (nickel size and less), they molt more often and possibly more vulnerable to injury. Again, I would coax it to my hand. What you may find is that they will scurry out of eyesight and play hide-and-seek. That is, careful, you can lose them. Although the Brachypelma smithi or Mexican Red Knee Tarantula is not necessarily a fast tarantula, when they're small, they can surprise you (sometimes) - not like baboon tarantulas, by any means, but they're all different. Anyway, another concern with small tarantulas is that sometimes folks will put them in a cage too large, making it more difficult for them to catch food, maintain humdidity, etc. I sometimes will go from a pill bottle, to a baby-food jar, to a larger jar or container and then to their larger habitats as they're pre-adult to full size. It is merely a suggestion. Good luck with your red knee, they're fairly slow growing, but certainly a longlived species (30 years or more for some female Mexican Red Knees). They were huge (available) in the market years ago, but now they're not as easy to find (unless you go to Kelly Swift as he has a HUGE Breeding female and she is a beaut).
        > >
        > > Best regards,
        > >
        > > Bert Wright
        > > Fellow Tarantula Keeper/Enthusiast
        > >
        > > --- In Pet_Tarantulas@yahoogroups.com, "patrick.devoe" <patrick.devoe@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Wow thanks thats some good stuff for newbees.
        > > > I guess my question is at what size is ok to handel as my T is the size of a nickel. I'm 41 and I have had tarantulas for years and own the bible of Tarantula books as you mentioned. I haven't held a baby tarantula as I belive they would move quite quickly,but I don't know perhaps you can answer this question.
        > > > I'll tell you this my wife has no fear of any tarantula, however she is scared of the crikets. She will hand me anyone of my tarantulas, to her there just bugs to me its the most exciting thing I can imagine
        > > > I enjoy my pets and talk to them,just needed some info on the slings and how they react to human contact.
        > > >
        > > > Thanks
        > > >
        > > > Patrick
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --- In Pet_Tarantulas@yahoogroups.com, "BertW" <Bert.H.Wright@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Patrick:
        > > > >
        > > > > Thanks for your Post. Question: How big, or what size is your Brachypelma smithi Mexican Red Knee Tarantula? Handling is something that you have to take from pet to pet as they (tarantulas) are all different. Yes, there are some that will have no part of it. They are really not different than any other animal and that is: If left alone for long periods of time with little 'interaction' (with cage cleaning, watering, feeding, etc.), they can tend to be less familiar with you and thereby, less receptive to you. Animals left in the wild - such as feril cats - over time will get more wild. Have you ever tried to even pet a feril cat? They will not have any part of it. I am in no way trying to compare a cat to a tarantula, but the basic attitude is what I am referring to.
        > > > >
        > > > > The Mexican Red knee is an excellent pet species as they are beautifully colored, long-lived and fairly receptive to handling - they are not as easily handled as a Grammastola Rosea or Chilean rose hair, in my opinion, as they can be a bit skittish and readily flick urticating bristles if bothered. The point that most people need to understand with handling any tarantula (and there are many keepers who will NOT handle their tarantulas for the very reason) is not what they will do to you, but what you can and might do to them - they cannot suffer a fall to the floor generally as this will invariably rupture their opisthosoma and kill them - there are exceptions, but not usually. My put on that is keep ALL handling close to the floor. Tarantulas can bite, they will bite, but normally they are receptive and will not bite. People are often bitten when they MIS-handle a tarantula. Until you get more familiar with handling and tarantulas in general, do not try to just grab your tarantula and pick it up - chances are great that you will be bitten - some people are ok with just grabbing a tarantula, but this is normally with a pet that is very familair with you and you to them. Until you become more familiar with tarantulas and handling thereof, try coaxing the tarantula to your hand or your forearm. Use a free hand to block or divert them. Know the red flags of handling and tarantula keeping - if and when a tarantula raises their forelegs - keep away, they will bite if provoked in this mood. Also, kicking urticating bristles with their hind legs is a sign of leave me alone - however, sometimes this can be just a natural reaction and will allow handling - but raised forelegs - leave that tarantula be for the moment. I recommend Stanley and Marguerite Schultz's Tarantula Keeper's Guide as a MUST-OWN reference for all Tarantula Keepers - there are tips on handling by the PROs in the Guide. Check on the internet for other tips on hamdling. Just be aware - handling a tarantula is DANGEROUS to the tarantula and you must take all precautions necessary NOT to injure your tarantula by picking it up. Patrick, my best advice is that TIME and frequent interaction is how best to get to know your tarantula, and for them to know you. Avoid keeping them isolated for extended periods of time and keep them where you will know when they need water, fed, or to be left alone when they are approaching molt - that is another tip - try to avoid handling a tarantula near molt - that is just my opinion. Have fun and enjoy your tarantula Keeping Experiences. Thanks Patrick.
        > > > >
        > > > > Bert Wright
        > > > > Fellow Tarantula Keeper/Enthusiast.
        > > > >
        > > > > --- In Pet_Tarantulas@yahoogroups.com, "patrick.devoe" <patrick.devoe@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Now that my new B. Smithi has become acquainted to her new home, how should I get her acquainted to me?
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Next I'm going to buy The Brazilian Black "Grammostola pulchra" due to the loss of my sling almost a year ago.
        > > > > >
        > > > > > Patrick
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • Dana Goodyear
        ... for safety/show reasons, you can always see where they are- over time it seems two hides-webbing spots are aquired by her in each area- arborel and
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 15, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          :) not a problem, my friend.  Ya, the "best" mix will vary by species.  Then again it always boils down to personal preference.  I personally prefer to emulate the natural environment as much as possible- with one exception.  Moss.  In most of the tanks, it is there, in some way, shape or form- the only exception being new world arid/dessert species.  I prefer the mix that hardens after you soak it the first time for one major reason- creating small pre tunnels along glass sides for the obligate burrowers out of those species, and they get no moss.  :)  The arid/sub tropical/tropical/arboreal always get it old world.  Main reason being that it, asside from a small increase in humidity when pre molt behavioral patterns are noticed, is visual.  A very dry substrate, for instance, for a P. Murinus that wants to burrow, will not hold up well....so- I layer the corners if not entire top layer with the moss mat- it allows them a place to burrow and for safety/show reasons, you can always see where they are- over time it seems two hides-webbing spots are aquired by her in each area- arborel and terrestrial- and what is unique is they are close by, not spread out- within a couple inches of each other-something I would guess, is for thei comfort/personal safety in the wild- as an obligate tagger, and animal dumb enough to survive the tag of a P. Murinus will not attempt a secondary run to get one, and thus they have a back up home right next door that is not ruined?  Not sure- but this winter she made one burrow, was not disturbed, anything- and the second night she made burrow number two, as usual about 4 inches from the first.  Murinus are quite the charectors in behavior.

          From: BertW <Bert.H.Wright@...>
          To: Pet_Tarantulas@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Thursday, November 15, 2012 11:47 AM
          Subject: [Pet_Tarantulas] Re: New Questions...
           
          Patrick:

          Thank you for the feedback. I suppose I may have been speaking in general terms on the speed of slings. In hindsight, some of the slow growers and longer lived may be a bit slow as they grow - then again, temperature, temperament and other factors play a part too. As far as substrate, I have wrestled with the best mixture for years - I still have lots of coconut fiber around in some cages - but I have a Peat moss, organic potting soil-mix that seems o.k. for the time being. Please continue to keep us posted on your keeping experiences. Thanks Patrick.

          Bert Wright
          Fellow Tarantula Keeper/Enthusiast

          --- In mailto:Pet_Tarantulas%40yahoogroups.com, "patrick.devoe" <patrick.devoe@...> wrote:
          >
          > Bert,
          > The reason I ask this question was because of the cocanut substrate I used in her cage, it came in a brick form and it had to be soaked in warm water before it would crumble apart.It startd growing mold and I had to replace the substrate. Potting soil with a mixture of peatmoss, this seems to be the best. I was worried the little T would be fast but it was very,very slow. I guess when it comes to questions its easy to ask questions but to know from experience is quie rewarding. No need to apologize,I agree with you on handling young tarantulas.
          >
          > Take care,
          >
          > Patrick
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In mailto:Pet_Tarantulas%40yahoogroups.com, "BertW" <Bert.H.Wright@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Patrick:
          > >
          > > Thanks again - I know that you've been around and have had T's for years as I have traded emails with you before. Please accept my apology if I seemingly was providing redundant information. Wee tarantulas (young-uns, spiderlings or 'Slings' as they're often referred to) are less intimidating than adult-sized tarantulas, but there are drawbacks to handling them, as well. Injury is the major concern. When they're little (nickel size and less), they molt more often and possibly more vulnerable to injury. Again, I would coax it to my hand. What you may find is that they will scurry out of eyesight and play hide-and-seek. That is, careful, you can lose them. Although the Brachypelma smithi or Mexican Red Knee Tarantula is not necessarily a fast tarantula, when they're small, they can surprise you (sometimes) - not like baboon tarantulas, by any means, but they're all different. Anyway, another concern with small tarantulas is that sometimes folks will put them in a cage too large, making it more difficult for them to catch food, maintain humdidity, etc. I sometimes will go from a pill bottle, to a baby-food jar, to a larger jar or container and then to their larger habitats as they're pre-adult to full size. It is merely a suggestion. Good luck with your red knee, they're fairly slow growing, but certainly a longlived species (30 years or more for some female Mexican Red Knees). They were huge (available) in the market years ago, but now they're not as easy to find (unless you go to Kelly Swift as he has a HUGE Breeding female and she is a beaut).
          > >
          > > Best regards,
          > >
          > > Bert Wright
          > > Fellow Tarantula Keeper/Enthusiast
          > >
          > > --- In mailto:Pet_Tarantulas%40yahoogroups.com, "patrick.devoe" <patrick.devoe@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Wow thanks thats some good stuff for newbees.
          > > > I guess my question is at what size is ok to handel as my T is the size of a nickel. I'm 41 and I have had tarantulas for years and own the bible of Tarantula books as you mentioned. I haven't held a baby tarantula as I belive they would move quite quickly,but I don't know perhaps you can answer this question.
          > > > I'll tell you this my wife has no fear of any tarantula, however she is scared of the crikets. She will hand me anyone of my tarantulas, to her there just bugs to me its the most exciting thing I can imagine
          > > > I enjoy my pets and talk to them,just needed some info on the slings and how they react to human contact.
          > > >
          > > > Thanks
          > > >
          > > > Patrick
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In mailto:Pet_Tarantulas%40yahoogroups.com, "BertW" <Bert.H.Wright@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > Patrick:
          > > > >
          > > > > Thanks for your Post. Question: How big, or what size is your Brachypelma smithi Mexican Red Knee Tarantula? Handling is something that you have to take from pet to pet as they (tarantulas) are all different. Yes, there are some that will have no part of it. They are really not different than any other animal and that is: If left alone for long periods of time with little 'interaction' (with cage cleaning, watering, feeding, etc.), they can tend to be less familiar with you and thereby, less receptive to you. Animals left in the wild - such as feril cats - over time will get more wild. Have you ever tried to even pet a feril cat? They will not have any part of it. I am in no way trying to compare a cat to a tarantula, but the basic attitude is what I am referring to.
          > > > >
          > > > > The Mexican Red knee is an excellent pet species as they are beautifully colored, long-lived and fairly receptive to handling - they are not as easily handled as a Grammastola Rosea or Chilean rose hair, in my opinion, as they can be a bit skittish and readily flick urticating bristles if bothered. The point that most people need to understand with handling any tarantula (and there are many keepers who will NOT handle their tarantulas for the very reason) is not what they will do to you, but what you can and might do to them - they cannot suffer a fall to the floor generally as this will invariably rupture their opisthosoma and kill them - there are exceptions, but not usually. My put on that is keep ALL handling close to the floor. Tarantulas can bite, they will bite, but normally they are receptive and will not bite. People are often bitten when they MIS-handle a tarantula. Until you get more familiar with handling and tarantulas in general, do not try to just grab your tarantula and pick it up - chances are great that you will be bitten - some people are ok with just grabbing a tarantula, but this is normally with a pet that is very familair with you and you to them. Until you become more familiar with tarantulas and handling thereof, try coaxing the tarantula to your hand or your forearm. Use a free hand to block or divert them. Know the red flags of handling and tarantula keeping - if and when a tarantula raises their forelegs - keep away, they will bite if provoked in this mood. Also, kicking urticating bristles with their hind legs is a sign of leave me alone - however, sometimes this can be just a natural reaction and will allow handling - but raised forelegs - leave that tarantula be for the moment. I recommend Stanley and Marguerite Schultz's Tarantula Keeper's Guide as a MUST-OWN reference for all Tarantula Keepers - there are tips on handling by the PROs in the Guide. Check on the internet for other tips on hamdling. Just be aware - handling a tarantula is DANGEROUS to the tarantula and you must take all precautions necessary NOT to injure your tarantula by picking it up. Patrick, my best advice is that TIME and frequent interaction is how best to get to know your tarantula, and for them to know you. Avoid keeping them isolated for extended periods of time and keep them where you will know when they need water, fed, or to be left alone when they are approaching molt - that is another tip - try to avoid handling a tarantula near molt - that is just my opinion. Have fun and enjoy your tarantula Keeping Experiences. Thanks Patrick.
          > > > >
          > > > > Bert Wright
          > > > > Fellow Tarantula Keeper/Enthusiast.
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In mailto:Pet_Tarantulas%40yahoogroups.com, "patrick.devoe" <patrick.devoe@> wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Now that my new B. Smithi has become acquainted to her new home, how should I get her acquainted to me?
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Next I'm going to buy The Brazilian Black "Grammostola pulchra" due to the loss of my sling almost a year ago.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Patrick
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.