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Ergonomic suggestions for the next Grand Opening

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  • Phillip Thorne
    I ve BCC d this to Cale and Michelle-at-the-store. If someone could forward it to the appropriate people running the next Grand Opening this weekend in
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 6, 2008
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      I've BCC'd this to Cale and Michelle-at-the-store. If someone could
      forward it to the appropriate people running the next Grand Opening
      this weekend in Massachusetts, I think a lot of volunteers (and their
      joints and muscles) would appreciate it.

      During this weekend's Master Build Event at King of Prussia, there
      were six small hoppers of bricks on each table for the use of
      kid-visitor-buildiers, periodically refilled from large bins kept
      beneath, concealed by elastic table skirts. This kept the area
      looking neat, but had severe consequences vis-a-vis workflow and
      ergonomics for the volunteers.

      I suggest that the following procedural changes should reduce the
      number of aches and pains incurred by volunteers, and might improve
      efficiency so that volunteers aren't as rushed with the refill
      operations. (Comments welcome.)

      1. Bins beneath the tables.

      Problem: Interrupting visitors during refill operations.

      Problem: Repeated bending and kneeling on hard mall floors.

      Fix: Don't hide the bins beneath the tables. Elevate them (on a table
      or atop other bins) for easy access.

      2. Filling hoppers directly from the bins.

      Problem: Interrupting visitors by forcing them to use an alternate
      hopper while their own is refilled.

      Problem: The squarish hoppers don't have handles, so forcing them
      through bricks (usually one-handed, because you're balancing with the
      other against the bin) is strenuous.

      Problem: Repeated back-and-forth trips to the bin as hoppers empty.

      Fix: Take a page from waitressing and use an intermediate container to
      transfer bricks from bin to hoppers. (A plastic juice jug would work,
      but a restaurant pitcher has an unnecessary spout.) Fill up at the
      bin, then circulate in one direction, topping off multiple hoppers in
      one trip.

      The supply bins could be kept inside the statue-perimeter, which is
      already unavoidably messy. Making them visible would also encourage
      faster refills from the QC-recycling room. (Look under table: "Oops,
      it's suddenly empty!")

      --
    • longhairedredneck220
      ... It s funny I was thinking some of the same things you were. Getting the bins out from under the table was kind of silly. Constantly needing to excuse
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 7, 2008
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        --- In Pennlug@yahoogroups.com, Phillip Thorne <pethorne@...> wrote:
        >
        > I've BCC'd this to Cale and Michelle-at-the-store. If someone could
        > forward it to the appropriate people running the next Grand Opening
        > this weekend in Massachusetts, I think a lot of volunteers (and their
        > joints and muscles) would appreciate it.
        >
        > During this weekend's Master Build Event at King of Prussia, there
        > were six small hoppers of bricks on each table for the use of
        > kid-visitor-buildiers, periodically refilled from large bins kept
        > beneath, concealed by elastic table skirts. This kept the area
        > looking neat, but had severe consequences vis-a-vis workflow and
        > ergonomics for the volunteers.
        >

        It's funny I was thinking some of the same things you were.  Getting the bins out from under the table was kind of silly.  Constantly needing to excuse yourself to get them and then be in the way as you fill or having to pick them up. 

         


        > I suggest that the following procedural changes should reduce the
        > number of aches and pains incurred by volunteers, and might improve
        > efficiency so that volunteers aren't as rushed with the refill
        > operations. (Comments welcome.)
        >
        > 1. Bins beneath the tables.
        >
        > Problem: Interrupting visitors during refill operations.
        >
        > Problem: Repeated bending and kneeling on hard mall floors.
        >
        > Fix: Don't hide the bins beneath the tables. Elevate them (on a table
        > or atop other bins) for easy access.

        I agree Phil.  As I said I was thinking of this as well. 
        >
        > 2. Filling hoppers directly from the bins.
        >
        > Problem: Interrupting visitors by forcing them to use an alternate
        > hopper while their own is refilled.
        >
        > Problem: The squarish hoppers don't have handles, so forcing them
        > through bricks (usually one-handed, because you're balancing with the
        > other against the bin) is strenuous.
        >
        > Problem: Repeated back-and-forth trips to the bin as hoppers empty.
        >
        > Fix: Take a page from waitressing and use an intermediate container to
        > transfer bricks from bin to hoppers. (A plastic juice jug would work,
        > but a restaurant pitcher has an unnecessary spout.) Fill up at the
        > bin, then circulate in one direction, topping off multiple hoppers in
        > one trip.
        >

        another excellent idea!


        > The supply bins could be kept inside the statue-perimeter, which is
        > already unavoidably messy. Making them visible would also encourage
        > faster refills from the QC-recycling room. (Look under table: "Oops,
        > it's suddenly empty!")
        >
        > --
        >

        Adding to the table with all the bins a "BRICK RESUPPLY DEPOT" or something like that may add to the overall feel they're looking for.

        I found that making a brick at the table with the kids and letting them "see" it, compare etc they were more eager and confident.  I think some were a bit concerned to "get it right" so their bricks could be used in the Yoda.  Others, well you saw thier work /:)


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