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Re: Lutterloh Pattern system

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  • SanderT
    Hi Fran, I have some experience with Lutterloh. The scale enlargement error s you talk about can be easily avoided. Firstly, I always use an enlarged pattern
    Message 1 of 38 , Mar 6, 2011
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      Hi Fran,

      I have some experience with Lutterloh.
      The scale enlargement error's you talk about can be easily avoided.

      Firstly, I always use an enlarged pattern sheet while enlarging.
      This has the effect the enlargement can be more accurately done.
      Secondly I use a stiff ruler in stead of the textile based tape measure which is suited for measuring but not so for drafting.

      The two alterations to the recommended work method results in more accurate patterns. Strangely the Lutterloh Company does not agree with both alterations but I have been studying the system on a mathmatical level and I can't come to any other conclussion that enlarging pattern sheets does not effect the way the enlarged pattern turns out. I have tested several alternatives all based on my enlarged pattern sheet idea, which all result in the exact same pattern. Both size and shape demand were met...

      Regards, Sander Tel


      --- In PatternDesign@yahoogroups.com, "francesgrimble" <fran@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In PatternDesign@yahoogroups.com, "N" <SeamsSoEasy@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I am part of the St. Louis ASG. A friend and I tested the Lutterloh patterns and found it was not consistant. Meaning the patterns were not always accurate. Sometime missing a section on a pattern pieces. They have fun designs that are worth coping.
      >
      > I haven't worked with Lutterloh because it's outside my main period of interest (which ends about 1930, aside from the modern clothes I make for myself). But, I have worked with a number of 19th and early 20th-century pattern-drafting systems that use apportioning scales. These are patent rulers whose units are not imperial or metric, but specific to that drafting system. The pattern diagrams published for the system are specific to that set of apportioning scales. You choose the ruler that accords with one of your specific measurements. The ways different systems do this vary, but for example it is common to choose a scale whose label corresponds to your bust measurement to draft bodice patterns. Then you use the scale to draft the pattern pieces, according to the numbers printed on the diagrams. So, if the printed diagram tells you to draw a line 28 units long you do so, regardless of which scale you are using.
      >
      > These systems are sensitive to how accurately you draft the published pattern diagram. You are always enlarging it from book-page size to human size, so a small error is multiplied several times in the enlarged version. I am pretty sure it is the same with Lutterloh.
      >
      > The other thing that may or may not be the same, is that the systems do not always provide all the pattern pieces for the garment in the section for that garment. (a) They usually expect the user to know how to draft things like common rectangular waistbands without a diagram. (b) To save space, they often tell the user to use a pattern piece for some other garment in the same publication, rather than printing it twice. This tends to confuse people, so in my anthologies of these patterns I repeat such pieces rather than cross-referencing all over the place.
      >
      > My opinion of pattern-drafting software is that it is unnecessary for the home drafter, someone who does not have to deliver a pattern in that format to am employer or client. Also, my one experiment with an AutoCAD-based drafting program was very frustrating. I felt it was a lot easier and cheaper to do this with a pencil, some common drafting tools, and a roll of paper. Admittedly, I went through a college fashion design program where I'd learned to draft patterns on paper, and I've been doing it ever since. It might be easier for someone not used to using paper to start out with a computer program. I still think that for home drafter, such software is a neat technical toy rather than a necessity.
      >
      > Fran
      > Lavolta Press
      > Books of historic clothing patterns
      > www.lavoltapress.com
      >
    • Joanne
      Greetings, I know this thread is an older one, but a person mentioned the purchase of a cd that I have been trying to locate for almost two years now. There
      Message 38 of 38 , Jan 24, 2013
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        Greetings,

        I know this thread is an older one, but a person mentioned the purchase of a cd that I have been trying to locate for almost two years now. There was a CD or DVD available on ebay with the lutterloh system on it....if anyone knows how to help me locate a copy of this or has a copy they are willing to part with or copy and sell to me, I would be grateful.

        I would greatly love to have the large collection that was offered, but by now I am grateful for an scans I can get.

        Please help me locate this collection.

        I wish you well,

        Joanneeve
        --- In PatternDesign@yahoogroups.com, "j.pook" wrote:
        >
        > thanks kathleen
        > will have to check if I have these,think I have oneof them,I bought mine on a cd so they are scans
        > was a birthday pressie
        > jane
        >
        >
        >
        > http://holliedesigns.blogspot.com/
        >
        > my world revolves just a different way(j.lodge)
        >
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