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The Buffalo~~~>

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  • FrenchIndian@webtv.net
    Hi all I received this from a web friend and wanted to pass it on you all~Thank you Zeph~~~~ Jeanne I think it s a crying shame, that people can slaughter
    Message 1 of 1 , May 3, 2002
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      Hi all I received this from a web friend and wanted to pass it on you
      all~Thank you Zeph~~~~>Jeanne

      I think it's a crying shame, that people can slaughter animals on false
      accusations, Oh, well if they can do it to their fellow human beings,
      what's to stop them.
      I know their cattle businesses are being threatened by the studies that
      Buffalo meat is better to consume then their chemical filled domestic
      cattle.
      We knew and still know the sacred Tatanka is indigenous to Turtle Island
      for the use of the Indigenous dwellers of this hemisphere and the cow
      was indigenous to the Europeans.
      My tears run for them.and I ask the Great Spirit to forgive them, for
      they know not what they do. These are my thoughts and feelings, and I
      hope that my fellow Landlords of this country, will join me... "Ishnana
      Najin" (Stands Alone)

      From:    Aimfl@... Date:    Wed, May 1, 2002, 9:20am
      Subject:    Action-Help stop the buffalo slaughter To:   
      SGMAIMFL@...
      Additional park bison killed
      WEST YELLOWSTONE - Seventy-two bison that left Yellowstone National Park
      Monday
      were sent to slaughter without being tested for brucellosis, federal and
      state
      officials said.
      "This is the second week that bison have been removed from the herd
      without
      being tested for the disease of brucellosis," said Montana state
      veterinarian
      Dr. Arnold Gertonson.
      The Interagency Bison Management Plan calls for killing bison that
      wander
      outside the park if the size of the herd is over 3,000. In late
      February, the
      National Park Service documented 3,300 bison, which does not include the
      spring
      calf count.
      The management plan was developed to reduce the risk of transmission of
      brucellosis from bison to cattle. The disease causes cattle to abort.
      An additional seven bison captured at the Horse Butte facility that had
      previously tested negative for brucellosis were released.
      Another 34 bison that left the park were hazed to a separate timbered
      area
      outside the park rather than being killed, the state Department of
      Livestock
      said.
      One protester was arrested by U.S. Forest Service law enforcement
      officers.
      http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2002/04/30/build
      /
      local/z-digest-mt.inc
      ====================
      Death Sentence Faces Roaming Bison
      HELENA, Montana, April 29, 2002 (ENS) - Any bison that wander outside
      the
      boundaries of Yellowstone National Park will be removed from the park's
      herd
      and slaughtered for the rest of the calving season, the Montana
      Department of
      Livestock said last week.
      Under the Interagency Bison Management Plan (IBMP), if there are more
      than
      3,000 bison in the park by late winter or early spring, Montana may kill
      bison
      found outside the park without testing them for brucellosis. Brucellosis
      is a
      bacterial disease that causes bison, cattle, elk and other hoofed
      mammals to
      spontaneously abort.
      Some physicians and biologists believe that exposure to brucellosis
      infected
      animals can cause a disease called undulant fever in humans.
      Montana and other states that border Yellowstone attempt to prevent the
      transmission of brucellosis to cattle herds by hazing bison that leave
      the
      park
      back across park borders. If that tactic fails, the bison may be
      captured and
      tested for brucellosis, and if they test positive, they may be
      slaughtered.
      Because the Yellowstone herd was measured in February at 3,300 bison,
      above
      the
      target set by the IBMP, the Montana Department of Livestock has opted to
      skip
      the testing step and just remove any bison found outside the park. The
      IBMP
      was
      developed by the state of Montana, the National Park Service, U.S.
      Forest
      Service, and Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
      "The decision to begin removing bison from the herd without brucellosis
      testing
      in the field was based on the large number of bison outside the Park and
      the
      fact that calving has begun," said Montana state veterinarian Arnold
      Gertonson.
      At least three calves were observed outside the park boundaries last
      week.
      Montana officials are also concerned by the confirmation that a cattle
      herd in
      Idaho, which was grazing on pasture shared by brucellosis infected elk,
      has
      tested positive for the disease.
      "This is a strong indication that our greatest concerns about the
      transmission
      of brucellosis from wildlife to domestic cattle herds is a very real
      possibility," said Montana Governor Judy Martz on April 20. "This proves
      that
      we must step up our efforts to eradicate brucellosis in wildlife in the
      Greater
      Yellowstone Area."
      Of a total of 35 bison captured last week, two were released - one that
      had
      previously tested negative for brucellosis and been radio collared for a
      research project, and one cow that gave birth while in captivity. The
      rest
      will
      be slaughtered.
      Critics of the brucellosis management tactics used by Montana note that
      documented cases of transmission of the disease from wildlife to
      domestic
      cattle are few. Most experts agree that brucellosis can only be
      transferred
      through amniotic fluid or aborted fetal tissue, yet many of the animals
      that
      are being hazed or slaughtered are male, non-pregnant females, or
      females too
      young to become pregnant.
      Of the bison captured last week, 11 were bulls and six were yearlings.
      Conservation groups point out that most bison captured outside the park
      are
      still on public lands, such as national forest lands where ranchers can
      buy
      grazing rights for their cattle.
      "The public lands surrounding Yellowstone should be managed for native
      species,
      not cows - as they were intended," said Jim Coefield of the Ecology
      Center in
      Missoula, Montana. "Wild buffalo hold a special place in the American
      public's
      hearts and heritage. They need room to roam outside Yellowstone Park on
      federal
      lands to survive."
      http://ens-news.com/ens/apr2002/2002L-04-29-07.html
      ====================
      (Note: in case some missed it from yesterday's article, here are two
      paragraphs
      from the Buffalo Field Campaign letter):
      ~~~~~~~~~~
      Not even the sparkling, azure sky can erase the memory of a fellow
      buffalo
      warrior's horrified description of a hazing operation in West
      Yellowstone.
      Tears born of sadness and frustration filled my eyes, as she described
      how
      Montana Department of Livestock agents on snowmobiles chased a group of
      bison
      into a barbed wire fence, wounding several of them. One bison in
      particular
      apparently suffered a dramatic injury, as evidenced by the trail of
      blood
      which
      followed him into the capture facility.
      Upon incarceration this animal, injured and physically traumatized, just
      simply
      laid down. The state agents were unable to coax him into the chutes for
      brucellosis testing and quickly grew frustrated with this wild animal's
      impudence. Physically overwhelmed and suffering, he continued to ignore
      their
      angry tirades as a large pool of red grew beside him. Finally, some of
      the
      agents decided to exercise punishment against their reluctant captive
      with the
      aid of a two by four piece of lumber. For ten to fifteen minutes, an
      eternity
      in bison time, the state of Montana's hired goons beat an already
      injured and
      traumatized wild animal.
      ~~~~~~~~~~
      Notes:
      Maybe the West Yellowstone Chamber of Commerce and the Montana
      Department of
      Tourism and some other organizations should hear from people about the
      ongoing,
      escalating Buffalo Slaughter (and snowmobile pollution in Yellowstone
      Park)
      A suggestion - as maddening as these two situations are - BOTH
      centralized in
      West Yellowstone - these people and agencies are more likely to pay
      attention
      to what hits then in their pocketbooks, rather than to the spicy words
      we'd
      LIKE to say to them:
      W.Yellowstone Chamber of Commerce (email):   
      wycc@...
      State of Montana Dept. of Tourism (email - Matthew Cohn, Director):
      matthew@...  and  matthew@...  and  
      thurston@...
      Yellowstone Country Montana (email):   yellowstone@...
      (Here's their online GuestBook:
      http://yellowstone.visitmt.com/guestbook/yellowstone_guestbook.asp?SiteID=17%c2%a0
      )
      Yellowstone Public Affairs (email):  YELL_Public_Affairs@...
      Montana Magazine (email):  editor@...
      Tom
      Karen Cooper of the Montana Department of Livestock announced
      yesterday that all wild buffalo roaming outside Yellowstone National
      Park on their traditional grazing and calving grounds will be
      slaughtered.
      Public agencies will no longer use the facade of brucellosis testing
      to determine if buffalo exposed to the disease (& carrying the
      antibody) get the death sentence.  All will be killed.  Cooper said
      she does not know how long DOL will continue killing animals without
      testing them.
      Yellowstone spokeswoman Marsha Karle said the National Park Service
      did not protest DOL's decision to get kill untested bison.
      What can you do? - Here's 4 options
      1) Nothing
      2) Speak out
      Yellowstone National Park's new supervisor is Suzanne Lewis.  Her
      number is: 307.344.2002; P.O. Box 168, Yellowstone National Park, WY
      82190-0168. Federal agencies must set a precedent and defend the
      biological integrity of this national treasure!
      Montana's State vet is Arnold Gertonson.  His number is:
      406-444-2043; Box 202201,Helena, MT 59620; agertonson@...  Why
      aren't they continuing to do tissue testing to prove their "disease
      management" excuse?  <answer: the brucellois argument is a sham!>>
      a five minute call or 34 cent stamp could save a buffalo's life!
      3) Pass this on to 32 friends in honor of the 32 buffalo slaughtered
      yesterday.
      4) Pass this on to one acquaintance in honor of the the abused
      buffalo whose leg was broken in the capture facility or to one person
      in honor of the wild momma buffalo who had to give birth to her calf
      in the capture facility.
      The American people must demand that wild buffalo be treated like
      wildlife and not treated as domestic livestock.  Buffalo need to be
      protected for future generations!  Arbitrary depopulation of the herd
      based on a population estimate that could be off by several hundred
      animals is absurd. Use Science, not
      Thank you!
      *********************************************************************************************
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