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new TED video posted about Photosynth

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  • Rik Littlefield
    Many of you will be interested in this new 7 minute online video. http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/129 From the TED introduction: Using photos of
    Message 1 of 3 , May 30, 2007
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      Many of you will be interested in this new 7 minute online video.

      http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/129

      From the TED introduction:
      Using photos of oft-snapped subjects (like Notre Dame)
      scraped from around the Web, Photosynth creates breathtaking
      multidimensional spaces with zoom and navigation features that
      outstrip all expectation. Its architect, Blaise Aguera y Arcas,
      shows it off in this standing-ovation demo. Curious about
      that speck in corner? Dive into a freefall and watch as
      the speck becomes a gargoyle. With an unpleasant grimace.
      And an ant-sized chip in its lower left molar. "Perhaps
      the most amazing demo I've seen this year," wrote Ethan Zuckerman,
      after TED2007. Indeed, Photosynth might utterly transform
      the way we manipulate and experience digital images.

      --Rik
    • Carl von Einem
      That was a good laugh! I love those promotional texts about standing ovations for a demo. One could ask if they just not had enough seats ;-) In fact modern
      Message 2 of 3 , May 30, 2007
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        That was a good laugh! I love those promotional texts about standing
        ovations for a demo. One could ask if they just not had enough seats ;-)
        In fact modern computers tend to use huge amounts of their power just to
        run that astonishing new operating system and a buggy office app. And
        the industrie wants us to buy even more powerful computers for their
        next generation of bloated apps.

        Diving into a newspaper's ad as demonstrated here is only possible if
        it's the ad of the sponsor and you happen to have access to all the high
        resolution print data. The cathedral's front is one of the most
        photographed buildings, but there's no way (yet) to generate an object
        movie that shows the facade from all directions. The gnome is one of the
        famous features and that's why you have that interesting detail
        somewhere on flickr. The statue two meters on the left will be just
        another blurry spot. Highly interesting and nice to see but IMHO just as
        relevant as the technology earlier demo'ed in Blade Runner (still one of
        my favourite movies). "Zoom in... Stop. Left. More detail..."

        Highlighting those tourist attractions might also lead to blind spots in
        different areas of the world. What if we didn't have people like Mickael
        Therer who show us those other parts of our world?
        http://www.guardian.co.uk/panoramic/page/0,,1869994,00.html

        I also love the World Wide Panorama on
        http://geoimages.berkeley.edu/wwp/ for making us all aware of topics
        every new quarter of the year, it's not just pretty pictures. It's the
        story behind it.

        It gives me the shivers when I think that maybe images from 9/11 might
        have been used for such a demo.

        Carl

        > http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/129
        > From the TED introduction:
        > Using photos of oft-snapped subjects (like Notre Dame)
        > scraped from around the Web, Photosynth creates breathtaking
        > multidimensional spaces with zoom and navigation features that
        > outstrip all expectation. Its architect, Blaise Aguera y Arcas,
        > shows it off in this standing-ovation demo. Curious about
        > that speck in corner? Dive into a freefall and watch as
        > the speck becomes a gargoyle. With an unpleasant grimace.
        > And an ant-sized chip in its lower left molar. "Perhaps
        > the most amazing demo I've seen this year," wrote Ethan Zuckerman,
        > after TED2007. Indeed, Photosynth might utterly transform
        > the way we manipulate and experience digital images.
      • Serge Maandag (yahoo)
        ... It s a panorama viewer on steroids. I like it a lot. They even offer a firefox plugin and it s smooth as can be. They must have had a really smart approach
        Message 3 of 3 , Jun 1, 2007
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          > Many of you will be interested in this new 7 minute online video.
          > http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/129

          It's a panorama viewer on steroids. I like it a lot.
          They even offer a firefox plugin and it's smooth as can be.

          They must have had a really smart approach on streaming imagery.

          It does not give the same experience as a panorama viewer imho. A panorama
          viewer can give you a real immersive feeling (provided your display is big
          enough). The type of viewing of this viewer makes you much more eager to
          start exploring a scene.

          A thing it misses is an indication of the quality of a view. After zooming
          in a few times in vain you might give up trying quickly.

          serge.
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