Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

d200

Expand Messages
  • oldfbii
    Hi, I just got the D200 (whooppee). Anyway, I am in the process of trying to figure out what the field of view of the D200 is when used with my standard lenses
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 9, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi,
      I just got the D200 (whooppee). Anyway, I am in the process of
      trying to figure out what the field of view of the D200 is when used
      with my standard lenses in order to get the correct number of pictures
      around. Is it just a matter of taking the fov and dividing by 1.5 for
      both horizontal and vertical?
      So that a 28mm lens used here would be instead of:
      30.4 and 65.0 degrees, would be:
      30.0 and 43.3 degrees respectfully. Right?


      It appears that the 8MM Peleng is a special case, for when it is
      installed it is still a full 180 degrees in the landscape direction
      (with some vignetting) but is cut in the vertical. (Just the opposite
      when used in my film camera) I assume six around plus up/dn would be OK?

      (The weather isn't cooperating for running outdoor tests just yet.)

      fritz
    • Philip Scott
      Suggest you look here: http://www.vrwave.com/panoramic/photography/lens_database.html ... From: oldfbii To:
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 9, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Suggest you look here:
        http://www.vrwave.com/panoramic/photography/lens_database.html


        ----- Original Message ----
        From: oldfbii <xtoper@...>
        To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Monday, April 9, 2007 7:01:55 PM
        Subject: [PanoToolsNG] d200













        Hi,

        I just got the D200 (whooppee). Anyway, I am in the process of

        trying to figure out what the field of view of the D200 is when used

        with my standard lenses in order to get the correct number of pictures

        around. Is it just a matter of taking the fov and dividing by 1.5 for

        both horizontal and vertical?

        So that a 28mm lens used here would be instead of:

        30.4 and 65.0 degrees, would be:

        30.0 and 43.3 degrees respectfully. Right?



        It appears that the 8MM Peleng is a special case, for when it is

        installed it is still a full 180 degrees in the landscape direction

        (with some vignetting) but is cut in the vertical. (Just the opposite

        when used in my film camera) I assume six around plus up/dn would be OK?



        (The weather isn't cooperating for running outdoor tests just yet.)



        fritz














        <!--

        #ygrp-mlmsg {font-size:13px;font-family:arial, helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}
        #ygrp-mlmsg table {font-size:inherit;font:100%;}
        #ygrp-mlmsg select, input, textarea {font:99% arial, helvetica, clean, sans-serif;}
        #ygrp-mlmsg pre, code {font:115% monospace;}
        #ygrp-mlmsg * {line-height:1.22em;}
        #ygrp-text{
        font-family:Georgia;
        }
        #ygrp-text p{
        margin:0 0 1em 0;}
        #ygrp-tpmsgs{
        font-family:Arial;
        clear:both;}
        #ygrp-vitnav{
        padding-top:10px;font-family:Verdana;font-size:77%;margin:0;}
        #ygrp-vitnav a{
        padding:0 1px;}
        #ygrp-actbar{
        clear:both;margin:25px 0;white-space:nowrap;color:#666;text-align:right;}
        #ygrp-actbar .left{
        float:left;white-space:nowrap;}
        .bld{font-weight:bold;}
        #ygrp-grft{
        font-family:Verdana;font-size:77%;padding:15px 0;}
        #ygrp-ft{
        font-family:verdana;font-size:77%;border-top:1px solid #666;
        padding:5px 0;
        }
        #ygrp-mlmsg #logo{
        padding-bottom:10px;}

        #ygrp-vital{
        background-color:#e0ecee;margin-bottom:20px;padding:2px 0 8px 8px;}
        #ygrp-vital #vithd{
        font-size:77%;font-family:Verdana;font-weight:bold;color:#333;text-transform:uppercase;}
        #ygrp-vital ul{
        padding:0;margin:2px 0;}
        #ygrp-vital ul li{
        list-style-type:none;clear:both;border:1px solid #e0ecee;
        }
        #ygrp-vital ul li .ct{
        font-weight:bold;color:#ff7900;float:right;width:2em;text-align:right;padding-right:.5em;}
        #ygrp-vital ul li .cat{
        font-weight:bold;}
        #ygrp-vital a {
        text-decoration:none;}

        #ygrp-vital a:hover{
        text-decoration:underline;}

        #ygrp-sponsor #hd{
        color:#999;font-size:77%;}
        #ygrp-sponsor #ov{
        padding:6px 13px;background-color:#e0ecee;margin-bottom:20px;}
        #ygrp-sponsor #ov ul{
        padding:0 0 0 8px;margin:0;}
        #ygrp-sponsor #ov li{
        list-style-type:square;padding:6px 0;font-size:77%;}
        #ygrp-sponsor #ov li a{
        text-decoration:none;font-size:130%;}
        #ygrp-sponsor #nc {
        background-color:#eee;margin-bottom:20px;padding:0 8px;}
        #ygrp-sponsor .ad{
        padding:8px 0;}
        #ygrp-sponsor .ad #hd1{
        font-family:Arial;font-weight:bold;color:#628c2a;font-size:100%;line-height:122%;}
        #ygrp-sponsor .ad a{
        text-decoration:none;}
        #ygrp-sponsor .ad a:hover{
        text-decoration:underline;}
        #ygrp-sponsor .ad p{
        margin:0;}
        o {font-size:0;}
        .MsoNormal {
        margin:0 0 0 0;}
        #ygrp-text tt{
        font-size:120%;}
        blockquote{margin:0 0 0 4px;}
        .replbq {margin:4;}
        -->









        ____________________________________________________________________________________
        Bored stiff? Loosen up...
        Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.
        http://games.yahoo.com/games/front

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Robert C. Fisher
        ... less than 30 deg, more like 20 by 43 degrees. ... on the D200 with camera in portrait 4 images around and maybe 1 down to cover the head. You should have
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 9, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          On Apr 9, 2007, at 5:01 PM, Philip Scott wrote:

          > Suggest you look here:
          > http://www.vrwave.com/panoramic/photography/lens_database.html
          >
          > ----- Original Message ----
          > From: oldfbii <xtoper@...>
          > To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Monday, April 9, 2007 7:01:55 PM
          > Subject: [PanoToolsNG] d200
          >
          > Hi,
          >
          > I just got the D200 (whooppee). Anyway, I am in the process of
          >
          > trying to figure out what the field of view of the D200 is when used
          >
          > with my standard lenses in order to get the correct number of pictures
          >
          > around. Is it just a matter of taking the fov and dividing by 1.5 for
          >
          > both horizontal and vertical?
          >
          > So that a 28mm lens used here would be instead of:
          >
          > 30.4 and 65.0 degrees, would be:
          >
          > 30.0 and 43.3 degrees respectfully. Right?
          less than 30 deg, more like 20 by 43 degrees.
          >
          > It appears that the 8MM Peleng is a special case, for when it is
          >
          > installed it is still a full 180 degrees in the landscape direction
          >
          > (with some vignetting) but is cut in the vertical. (Just the opposite
          >
          > when used in my film camera) I assume six around plus up/dn would
          > be OK?
          on the D200 with camera in portrait 4 images around and maybe 1 down
          to cover the head. You should have around 178-180 deg vertical and
          120 deg horizontal. If you tilt up about 5 deg you can cover
          everything except the tripod head and not have to fix the hole in the
          sky you may get if the image is just under 180 deg.
          >
          > (The weather isn't cooperating for running outdoor tests just yet.)
          >
          > fritz
          >
          Cheers
          Robert C. Fisher
          VR Photography/Cinematography
        • oldfbii
          ... Thank you very much for the pointer to that very informative database of lenses. Appreciate it! Thanks fritz ... Thanks Mr. Fisher! Now if the wx will get
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 9, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Philip Scott wrote:
            >
            > > Suggest you look here:
            > > http://www.vrwave.com/panoramic/photography/lens_database.html
            > >

            Thank you very much for the pointer to that very informative
            database of lenses. Appreciate it!

            Thanks
            fritz



            > on the D200 with camera in portrait 4 images around and maybe 1 down
            > to cover the head. You should have around 178-180 deg vertical and
            > 120 deg horizontal. If you tilt up about 5 deg you can cover
            > everything except the tripod head and not have to fix the hole in the
            > sky you may get if the image is just under 180 deg.

            > Cheers
            > Robert C. Fisher
            > VR Photography/Cinematography
            >

            Thanks Mr. Fisher! Now if the wx will get better I'll test!

            Again appreciate the response!

            fritz
          • John Houghton
            ... No, that doesn t work. The crop factor of 1.5 means that the 28mm lens has the same angle of view as a 42mm lens on a 35mm film camera. The angle of view
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 9, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "oldfbii" <xtoper@...> wrote:
              >
              > Is it just a matter of taking the fov and dividing by 1.5 for
              > both horizontal and vertical?

              No, that doesn't work. The crop factor of 1.5 means that the 28mm lens
              has the same angle of view as a 42mm lens on a 35mm film camera. The
              angle of view is not inversely proportional to the focal length. E.g.
              if you double the focal length, the angle of view does not halve.

              The easy way of finding the angle of view is to add an image to PTGui,
              set the focal length and crop factor, and use the Fit Image button on
              the Panorama Editor window. Read off the angles of view at the
              bottom. For the 28mm lens, that would give you 31.9 x 46.4.

              John
            • oldfbii
              ... Thanks John, I was trying to work it out by doing drawings in designer but was getting a little frustrated. Appreciate it very much! fritz
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 10, 2007
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "John Houghton" <j.houghton@...>
                wrote:
                > No, that doesn't work. The crop factor of 1.5 means that the 28mm lens
                > has the same angle of view as a 42mm lens on a 35mm film camera. The
                > angle of view is not inversely proportional to the focal length. E.g.
                > if you double the focal length, the angle of view does not halve.
                >
                > The easy way of finding the angle of view is to add an image to PTGui,
                > set the focal length and crop factor, and use the Fit Image button on
                > the Panorama Editor window. Read off the angles of view at the
                > bottom. For the 28mm lens, that would give you 31.9 x 46.4.
                >
                > John
                >
                Thanks John,
                I was trying to work it out by doing drawings in designer but
                was getting a little frustrated. Appreciate it very much!

                fritz
              • Bjørn K Nilssen
                ... And if you want to know the fov of a lens which you don t have access to, you could try f/calc from http://www.tangentsoft.net/ Maybe even easier than
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 10, 2007
                • 0 Attachment
                  On 10 Apr 2007 at 13:58, oldfbii wrote:

                  > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "John Houghton" <j.houghton@...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > No, that doesn't work. The crop factor of 1.5 means that the 28mm lens
                  > > has the same angle of view as a 42mm lens on a 35mm film camera. The
                  > > angle of view is not inversely proportional to the focal length. E.g.
                  > > if you double the focal length, the angle of view does not halve.
                  > >
                  > > The easy way of finding the angle of view is to add an image to PTGui,
                  > > set the focal length and crop factor, and use the Fit Image button on
                  > > the Panorama Editor window. Read off the angles of view at the
                  > > bottom. For the 28mm lens, that would give you 31.9 x 46.4.
                  > >
                  > > John
                  > >
                  > Thanks John,
                  > I was trying to work it out by doing drawings in designer but
                  > was getting a little frustrated. Appreciate it very much!

                  And if you want to know the fov of a lens which you don't have access to, you could try
                  f/calc from http://www.tangentsoft.net/
                  Maybe even easier than using PTgui?

                  --
                  Bjørn K Nilssen - http://www.bknilssen.no - panoramas and 3D
                • John Houghton
                  ... to, you could .... Well, you don t need an image actually taken with a 28mm lens to work out it s fov with PTGui. Any 3:2 image will do. The image
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 10, 2007
                  • 0 Attachment
                    --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Bjørn K Nilssen <bk@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > And if you want to know the fov of a lens which you don't have access
                    to, you could ....

                    Well, you don't need an image actually taken with a 28mm lens to work
                    out it's fov with PTGui. Any 3:2 image will do. The image content is
                    irrelevant.

                    John
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.