Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

converting cylindrical images to equirectangulars

Expand Messages
  • Yuval Levy
    Hi all, there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to convert cylindrical images to equirectangular. John Houghton points out that if
    Message 1 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
      Hi all,

      there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
      convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.

      John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
      non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
      cropped areas, albeit blank.

      Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
      runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
      that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
      to equirect?

      Yuv

      --
      Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy
      Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup
      strictly forbidden.
    • Yuval Levy
      Hi all, there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to convert cylindrical images to equirectangular. John Houghton points out that if
      Message 2 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
        Hi all,

        there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
        convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.

        John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
        non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
        cropped areas, albeit blank.

        Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
        runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
        that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
        to equirect?

        Yuv

        --
        Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy
        Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup
        strictly forbidden.
      • Yuval Levy
        Hi all, there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to convert cylindrical images to equirectangular. John Houghton points out that if
        Message 3 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
          Hi all,

          there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
          convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.

          John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
          non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
          cropped areas, albeit blank.

          Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
          runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
          that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
          to equirect?

          Yuv

          --
          Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy
          Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup
          strictly forbidden.
        • Yuval Levy
          Hi all, there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to convert cylindrical images to equirectangular. John Houghton points out that if
          Message 4 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
            Hi all,

            there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
            convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.

            John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
            non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
            cropped areas, albeit blank.

            Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
            runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
            that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
            to equirect?

            Yuv

            --
            Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy
            Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup
            strictly forbidden.
          • Yuval Levy
            Hi all, there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to convert cylindrical images to equirectangular. John Houghton points out that if
            Message 5 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
              Hi all,

              there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
              convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.

              John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
              non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
              cropped areas, albeit blank.

              Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
              runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
              that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
              to equirect?

              Yuv

              --
              Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy
              Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup
              strictly forbidden.
            • Yuval Levy
              Hi all, there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to convert cylindrical images to equirectangular. John Houghton points out that if
              Message 6 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                Hi all,

                there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.

                John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                cropped areas, albeit blank.

                Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                to equirect?

                Yuv

                --
                Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy
                Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup
                strictly forbidden.
              • dmgalpha
                ... totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle. ... Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image). All you need is a point. Then
                Message 7 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                  --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi all,
                  >
                  > there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                  > convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                  >
                  > John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                  > non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                  > cropped areas, albeit blank.
                  >

                  totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.


                  > Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                  > runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                  > that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                  > to equirect?
                  >

                  Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                  All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                  bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                  matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                  to equirectangular.

                  dmg
                • dmgalpha
                  ... totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle. ... Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image). All you need is a point. Then
                  Message 8 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                    --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi all,
                    >
                    > there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                    > convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                    >
                    > John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                    > non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                    > cropped areas, albeit blank.
                    >

                    totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.


                    > Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                    > runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                    > that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                    > to equirect?
                    >

                    Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                    All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                    bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                    matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                    to equirectangular.

                    dmg
                  • dmgalpha
                    ... totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle. ... Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image). All you need is a point. Then
                    Message 9 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi all,
                      >
                      > there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                      > convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                      >
                      > John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                      > non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                      > cropped areas, albeit blank.
                      >

                      totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.


                      > Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                      > runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                      > that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                      > to equirect?
                      >

                      Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                      All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                      bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                      matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                      to equirectangular.

                      dmg
                    • dmgalpha
                      ... totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle. ... Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image). All you need is a point. Then
                      Message 10 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                        --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi all,
                        >
                        > there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                        > convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                        >
                        > John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                        > non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                        > cropped areas, albeit blank.
                        >

                        totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.


                        > Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                        > runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                        > that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                        > to equirect?
                        >

                        Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                        All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                        bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                        matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                        to equirectangular.

                        dmg
                      • dmgalpha
                        ... totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle. ... Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image). All you need is a point. Then
                        Message 11 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi all,
                          >
                          > there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                          > convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                          >
                          > John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                          > non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                          > cropped areas, albeit blank.
                          >

                          totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.


                          > Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                          > runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                          > that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                          > to equirect?
                          >

                          Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                          All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                          bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                          matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                          to equirectangular.

                          dmg
                        • dmgalpha
                          ... totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle. ... Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image). All you need is a point. Then
                          Message 12 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hi all,
                            >
                            > there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                            > convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                            >
                            > John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                            > non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                            > cropped areas, albeit blank.
                            >

                            totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.


                            > Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                            > runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                            > that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                            > to equirect?
                            >

                            Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                            All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                            bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                            matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                            to equirectangular.

                            dmg
                          • dmgalpha
                            ... totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle. ... Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image). All you need is a point. Then
                            Message 13 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi all,
                              >
                              > there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                              > convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                              >
                              > John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                              > non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                              > cropped areas, albeit blank.
                              >

                              totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.


                              > Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                              > runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                              > that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                              > to equirect?
                              >

                              Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                              All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                              bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                              matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                              to equirectangular.

                              dmg
                            • dmgalpha
                              ... totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle. ... Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image). All you need is a point. Then
                              Message 14 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Hi all,
                                >
                                > there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                                > convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                                >
                                > John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                                > non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                                > cropped areas, albeit blank.
                                >

                                totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.


                                > Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                                > runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                                > that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                                > to equirect?
                                >

                                Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                                All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                                bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                                matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                                to equirectangular.

                                dmg
                              • dmgalpha
                                ... totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle. ... Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image). All you need is a point. Then
                                Message 15 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                                  --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Hi all,
                                  >
                                  > there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                                  > convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                                  >
                                  > John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                                  > non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                                  > cropped areas, albeit blank.
                                  >

                                  totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.


                                  > Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                                  > runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                                  > that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                                  > to equirect?
                                  >

                                  Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                                  All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                                  bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                                  matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                                  to equirectangular.

                                  dmg
                                • dmgalpha
                                  ... totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle. ... Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image). All you need is a point. Then
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                                    --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Hi all,
                                    >
                                    > there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                                    > convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                                    >
                                    > John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                                    > non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                                    > cropped areas, albeit blank.
                                    >

                                    totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.


                                    > Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                                    > runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                                    > that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                                    > to equirect?
                                    >

                                    Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                                    All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                                    bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                                    matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                                    to equirectangular.

                                    dmg
                                  • Yuval Levy
                                    ... wouldn t there be a way to find it programmatically, e.g. through the curves in non-vertical lines? Yuv -- Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy Verbatim copying
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                                      dmgalpha wrote:
                                      > Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).

                                      wouldn't there be a way to find it programmatically, e.g. through the
                                      curves in non-vertical lines?

                                      Yuv


                                      --
                                      Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy
                                      Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup
                                      strictly forbidden.
                                    • Yuval Levy
                                      ... wouldn t there be a way to find it programmatically, e.g. through the curves in non-vertical lines? Yuv -- Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy Verbatim copying
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                                        dmgalpha wrote:
                                        > Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).

                                        wouldn't there be a way to find it programmatically, e.g. through the
                                        curves in non-vertical lines?

                                        Yuv


                                        --
                                        Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy
                                        Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup
                                        strictly forbidden.
                                      • Joost Nieuwenhuijse
                                        Actually you don t have to modify the cylindrical image; instead you should be able to adjust the vertical shift (e parameter) until the horizon is in the
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Mar 28, 2007
                                          Actually you don't have to modify the cylindrical image; instead you
                                          should be able to adjust the vertical shift (e parameter) until the
                                          horizon is in the middle. I think this can be done in all guis, in PTGui
                                          it's on the Lens Settings tab.

                                          John is right: if not done properly, and the resulting equirect is
                                          loaded in a panorama viewer, straight lines will become curved.

                                          Joost


                                          dmgalpha wrote:
                                          > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                                          >> Hi all,
                                          >>
                                          >> there is an interesting discussion on the PTgui mailing list on how to
                                          >> convert cylindrical images to equirectangular.
                                          >>
                                          >> John Houghton points out that if the cylindrical image has been cropped
                                          >> non symmetrically, then some attempts should be made to restore the
                                          >> cropped areas, albeit blank.
                                          >>
                                          >
                                          > totally! The horizon should be exactly in the middle.
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >> Which leads to my question: is there a way to identify where the horizon
                                          >> runs in a cropped cylindrical image, if possible programmatically, so
                                          >> that it is possible to restore those "cropped areas" before translating
                                          >> to equirect?
                                          >>
                                          >
                                          > Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                                          > All you need is a point. Then compute the distance to the top and
                                          > bottom edges. If it is not the same, enlarge the smaller side so it
                                          > matches. Now you have a "complete" cylindrical that you can easily map
                                          > to equirectangular.
                                        • Ian Wood
                                          ... I would think setting a series of vertical line points around the scene and optimising vertical offset would do the job. Ian
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Mar 29, 2007
                                            On 29 Mar 2007, at 01:17, Yuval Levy wrote:

                                            > dmgalpha wrote:
                                            >> Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                                            >
                                            > wouldn't there be a way to find it programmatically, e.g. through the
                                            > curves in non-vertical lines?
                                            >
                                            > Yuv

                                            I would think setting a series of vertical line points around the
                                            scene and optimising vertical offset would do the job.

                                            Ian
                                          • Yuval Levy
                                            ... that s still manual. I rephrase my wish: a way to feed a ton of asymmetrically cropped cylinders into some piece of code that would find out how where the
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Mar 29, 2007
                                              Ian Wood wrote:
                                              > On 29 Mar 2007, at 01:17, Yuval Levy wrote:
                                              >> dmgalpha wrote:

                                              >>> Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                                              >>>
                                              >> wouldn't there be a way to find it programmatically, e.g. through the
                                              >> curves in non-vertical lines?
                                              >
                                              > I would think setting a series of vertical line points around the
                                              > scene and optimising vertical offset would do the job.

                                              that's still manual. I rephrase my wish: a way to feed a ton of
                                              asymmetrically cropped cylinders into some piece of code that would find
                                              out how where the horizon is and fill in the blank?

                                              Yuv

                                              --
                                              Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy
                                              Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup
                                              strictly forbidden.
                                            • dmgalpha
                                              ... Do you want the theoretical answer? I suspect the answer is yes. You might have to do feature extraction, determine potential horizontal lines, and from
                                              Message 22 of 27 , Mar 29, 2007
                                                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Yuval Levy <yahoo06@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Ian Wood wrote:
                                                > > On 29 Mar 2007, at 01:17, Yuval Levy wrote:
                                                > >> dmgalpha wrote:
                                                >
                                                > >>> Find the horizon (the only way to do this is to inspect the image).
                                                > >>>
                                                > >> wouldn't there be a way to find it programmatically, e.g. through the
                                                > >> curves in non-vertical lines?
                                                > >
                                                > > I would think setting a series of vertical line points around the
                                                > > scene and optimising vertical offset would do the job.
                                                >
                                                > that's still manual. I rephrase my wish: a way to feed a ton of
                                                > asymmetrically cropped cylinders into some piece of code that would find
                                                > out how where the horizon is and fill in the blank?
                                                >
                                                > Yuv

                                                Do you want the theoretical answer? I suspect the answer is yes. You
                                                might have to do feature extraction, determine potential horizontal
                                                lines, and from their curvature estimate the location of the horizon.

                                                How good will it work? I don't know.

                                                For me the practical answer is to create a simple user interface where
                                                a user can choose the point where the horizon is and move to the next
                                                image.

                                                This task is not one that is very likely to be needed by other
                                                individuals, so the programming effort to solve it automatically might
                                                be larger than the non-skill effort needed to pin-point the horizon.

                                                dmg
                                              • Yuval Levy
                                                ... as so often, you are probably right. Yuv -- Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup strictly
                                                Message 23 of 27 , Mar 29, 2007
                                                  dmgalpha wrote:
                                                  > This task is not one that is very likely to be needed by other
                                                  > individuals, so the programming effort to solve it automatically might
                                                  > be larger than the non-skill effort needed to pin-point the horizon.

                                                  as so often, you are probably right.

                                                  Yuv

                                                  --
                                                  Copyright © 2007 Yuval Levy
                                                  Verbatim copying and distribution on other medium than YahooGroup
                                                  strictly forbidden.
                                                • dmgalpha
                                                  ... PTGui ... Using panotools or similar tools is like using a hammer to kill a fly. You don t need to remap the image. All you need is to fill the empty
                                                  Message 24 of 27 , Mar 29, 2007
                                                    --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Joost Nieuwenhuijse <imim@...> wrote:
                                                    >
                                                    > Actually you don't have to modify the cylindrical image; instead you
                                                    > should be able to adjust the vertical shift (e parameter) until the
                                                    > horizon is in the middle. I think this can be done in all guis, in
                                                    PTGui
                                                    > it's on the Lens Settings tab.
                                                    >
                                                    > John is right: if not done properly, and the resulting equirect is
                                                    > loaded in a panorama viewer, straight lines will become curved.
                                                    >
                                                    > Joost

                                                    Using panotools or similar tools is like using a hammer to kill a fly.
                                                    You don't need to remap the image. All you need is to fill the empty
                                                    space.

                                                    dmg
                                                  • Joost Nieuwenhuijse
                                                    ... But the question was about remapping from cylindrical to equirect.. So you can do it in one go, without editing the source image. Joost
                                                    Message 25 of 27 , Mar 29, 2007
                                                      dmgalpha wrote:
                                                      > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Joost Nieuwenhuijse <imim@...> wrote:
                                                      >> Actually you don't have to modify the cylindrical image; instead you
                                                      >> should be able to adjust the vertical shift (e parameter) until the
                                                      >> horizon is in the middle. I think this can be done in all guis, in
                                                      > PTGui
                                                      >> it's on the Lens Settings tab.
                                                      >>
                                                      >> John is right: if not done properly, and the resulting equirect is
                                                      >> loaded in a panorama viewer, straight lines will become curved.
                                                      >>
                                                      >> Joost
                                                      >
                                                      > Using panotools or similar tools is like using a hammer to kill a fly.
                                                      > You don't need to remap the image. All you need is to fill the empty
                                                      > space.

                                                      But the question was about remapping from cylindrical to equirect.. So
                                                      you can do it in one go, without editing the source image.

                                                      Joost
                                                    • dmgalpha
                                                      ... You are combining two problems into 1. Problem one: finding the horizon in the original image. You suggest to use PToptimizer to do this. In my opinion
                                                      Message 26 of 27 , Mar 30, 2007
                                                        --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Joost Nieuwenhuijse <imim@...> wrote:
                                                        >
                                                        > dmgalpha wrote:
                                                        > > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Joost Nieuwenhuijse <imim@> wrote:
                                                        > >> Actually you don't have to modify the cylindrical image; instead you
                                                        > >> should be able to adjust the vertical shift (e parameter) until the
                                                        > >> horizon is in the middle. I think this can be done in all guis, in
                                                        > > PTGui
                                                        > >> it's on the Lens Settings tab.
                                                        > >>
                                                        > >> John is right: if not done properly, and the resulting equirect is
                                                        > >> loaded in a panorama viewer, straight lines will become curved.
                                                        > >>
                                                        > >> Joost
                                                        > >
                                                        > > Using panotools or similar tools is like using a hammer to kill a fly.
                                                        > > You don't need to remap the image. All you need is to fill the empty
                                                        > > space.
                                                        >
                                                        > But the question was about remapping from cylindrical to equirect.. So
                                                        > you can do it in one go, without editing the source image.
                                                        >
                                                        > Joost
                                                        >


                                                        You are combining two problems into 1.

                                                        Problem one: finding the horizon in the original image. You suggest to
                                                        use PToptimizer to do this. In my opinion this is an overkill.

                                                        Problem two. Remap from cylindrical to equirectilinear. This requires
                                                        PTmender (or similar).

                                                        dmg
                                                      • Ian Wood
                                                        ... Actually, that was my suggestion not Joost s. Ian
                                                        Message 27 of 27 , Mar 30, 2007
                                                          On 30 Mar 2007, at 09:55, dmgalpha wrote:

                                                          > Problem one: finding the horizon in the original image. You suggest to
                                                          > use PToptimizer to do this. In my opinion this is an overkill.

                                                          Actually, that was my suggestion not Joost's.

                                                          Ian
                                                        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.