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Re: [PanoToolsNG] NASCAR panorama

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  • Ian Wood
    ... Interesting stuff! Not quite as innovative or unique as it s made out to be in the article, though. But that s partly just journalism. Slitscan photography
    Message 1 of 11 , Mar 2, 2007
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      On 1 Mar 2007, at 23:24, jasonwalp wrote:

      > A friend just sent me this article about a photographer shooting
      > panoramas at the NASCAR race at Daytona:
      >
      > http://autoweek.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070223/FREE/
      > 70216011/1065/FREE
      >
      > Thought this would be the perfect group to share it with.

      Interesting stuff!

      Not quite as innovative or unique as it's made out to be in the
      article, though. But that's partly just journalism.

      Slitscan photography is a well-understood technique used by a
      surprisingly large number of photographers - I personally know two
      (and know of a third) in the UK alone who have used similar
      electronically-controlled motor-driven medium format cameras... I'll
      admit that 66" per second is pretty unusual.

      Tim MacMillan (the timeslice guy) has a lot of images that are *very*
      similar to those on the Distavision site, but they were done in the
      Eighties and Nineties and aren't on the web anywhere. :-(
      <http://www.timeslicefilms.com/>

      You can see images which are a bit similar to Tim's by Andrew Davidhazy:
      http://www.rit.edu/~andpph/>

      Dominic Pote uses a similar system but to quite different effect:
      <http://dominicpote.co.uk/main.php>
      I'll give you three guesses who made his first integrated motorised
      camera for him...


      For a really comprehensive list of stuff have a look at <http://
      www.flong.com/writings/lists/list_slit_scan.html> which contains both
      moving film and video slitscan work.

      Other stuff:
      <http://www.gavaligai.com/main/sub/installation/PixelPresent/
      PixelPresent.html>

      Half a mile of train on fourteen feet of film:
      <http://www.invisiblephotography.com/image.htm>



      Last but definitely not least, after the 2006 PT meeting in Bath
      where we visited Tim MacMillan, Thomas Rauscher knocked up a Flash
      slitscan app which works with your webcam:
      <http://www.panotools.org/node/22>

      Ian
    • Roger D. Williams
      On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 18:42:06 +0900, Andrei Zdetovetchi ... Andrei, his camera is essentially a fixed slit past which the cars pass, and a
      Message 2 of 11 , Mar 2, 2007
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        On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 18:42:06 +0900, Andrei Zdetovetchi <zdeto@...>
        wrote:

        > Very interesting!
        > I looked on Datavision/Rick Graves portfolio, and the images I saw there
        > look weird, yet interesting but some of them look grotesque, like a
        > nightmare. I am talking about the one's with people inside... very
        > deformed. Also most of his images have some vertical stripes in them...
        > Anyone has any ideea about how he managed to create this? My head is
        > filled with technical questions now.... ;))
        > Best regards,
        > Andrei Zdetovetchi
        >
        > the panoblogus - http://www.csvd.ro/panoblog/

        Andrei, his camera is essentially a fixed slit past which the cars pass,
        and a moto drives the film past the slit at a speed that matches the
        passage of the cars in front of the slit. Any slight mismatch, which
        would result in foreshortening or stretching of the car images could
        presumably be easily corrected in PhotoShop.

        Since people, and the various parts of their bodies, all pass the slit
        at varying speeds, there is much more distortion in the resulting
        images than there is with NASDAR cars, which all go past in a tight
        bunch at about the same speed.

        The same effect can be seen in Seiko photo-finish picture of the finishes
        of major sporting events, like Carl Luis's breaking of the 100m 10sec
        barrier (which I personally witnessed here in Tokyo).

        Roger

        --
        Work: www.adex-japan.com
        Play: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
      • Flemming V. Larsen
        The European Indoor Championships is going on right how in in Birmingham - you just have to find a sport channel showing it to see similar cameras in action.
        Message 3 of 11 , Mar 2, 2007
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          The European Indoor Championships is going on right how in in Birmingham -
          you just have to find a sport channel showing it to see similar cameras in
          action.
          Or go to your local horse-race web-page, like this
          http://www.skivetrav.com/m%E5l_foto.htm
        • d9616
          Recently went to FOCUS on imaging exhibition at the NEC in Birmingham (UK) and saw this 360 camera by Spheron http://www.teamworkphoto.com/spheron.html My
          Message 4 of 11 , Mar 2, 2007
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            Recently went to FOCUS on imaging exhibition at the NEC in Birmingham
            (UK) and saw this 360 camera by Spheron

            http://www.teamworkphoto.com/spheron.html

            My guess is that the NASCAR photos were taken with something similar
            with the 360 revolution matched to the average laptime of the cars,
            thus rendering the complete oval blurred whilst recording the cars as
            sharp.

            Just my 2p worth

            Dave H










            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Ian Wood <panolists@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > On 1 Mar 2007, at 23:24, jasonwalp wrote:
            >
            > > A friend just sent me this article about a photographer shooting
            > > panoramas at the NASCAR race at Daytona:
            > >
            > > http://autoweek.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070223/FREE/
            > > 70216011/1065/FREE
            > >
            > > Thought this would be the perfect group to share it with.
            >
            > Interesting stuff!
            >
            > Not quite as innovative or unique as it's made out to be in the
            > article, though. But that's partly just journalism.
            >
            > Slitscan photography is a well-understood technique used by a
            > surprisingly large number of photographers - I personally know two
            > (and know of a third) in the UK alone who have used similar
            > electronically-controlled motor-driven medium format cameras...
            I'll
            > admit that 66" per second is pretty unusual.
            >
            > Tim MacMillan (the timeslice guy) has a lot of images that are
            *very*
            > similar to those on the Distavision site, but they were done in
            the
            > Eighties and Nineties and aren't on the web anywhere. :-(
            > <http://www.timeslicefilms.com/>
            >
            > You can see images which are a bit similar to Tim's by Andrew
            Davidhazy:
            > http://www.rit.edu/~andpph/>
            >
            > Dominic Pote uses a similar system but to quite different effect:
            > <http://dominicpote.co.uk/main.php>
            > I'll give you three guesses who made his first integrated
            motorised
            > camera for him...
            >
            >
            > For a really comprehensive list of stuff have a look at <http://
            > www.flong.com/writings/lists/list_slit_scan.html> which contains
            both
            > moving film and video slitscan work.
            >
            > Other stuff:
            > <http://www.gavaligai.com/main/sub/installation/PixelPresent/
            > PixelPresent.html>
            >
            > Half a mile of train on fourteen feet of film:
            > <http://www.invisiblephotography.com/image.htm>
            >
            >
            >
            > Last but definitely not least, after the 2006 PT meeting in Bath
            > where we visited Tim MacMillan, Thomas Rauscher knocked up a Flash
            > slitscan app which works with your webcam:
            > <http://www.panotools.org/node/22>
            >
            > Ian
            >
          • Ian Wood
            It s a static camera with moving film. If it were rotating it would be the ground would be clear and the cars would either be long blurs (if travelling in the
            Message 5 of 11 , Mar 2, 2007
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              It's a static camera with moving film.

              If it were rotating it would be the ground would be clear and the
              cars would either be long blurs (if travelling in the same direction
              as the camera) or very short blobs (if travelling against the camera).

              But it could be done with a Spheron or other scanning camera if you
              turned the rotation motor off - might not be enough control over
              speed, though.

              Ian

              On 2 Mar 2007, at 14:58, d9616 wrote:

              >
              > Recently went to FOCUS on imaging exhibition at the NEC in Birmingham
              > (UK) and saw this 360 camera by Spheron
              >
              > http://www.teamworkphoto.com/spheron.html
              >
              > My guess is that the NASCAR photos were taken with something similar
              > with the 360 revolution matched to the average laptime of the cars,
              > thus rendering the complete oval blurred whilst recording the cars as
              > sharp.
              >
              > Just my 2p worth
              >
              > Dave H
            • Flemming V. Larsen
              With my old Spinshot rotating camera for film I could fasten the camera and let the handle roll to have it worl like at finish line slit-camera . Wouldn t it
              Message 6 of 11 , Mar 2, 2007
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                With my old Spinshot rotating camera for film I could fasten the camera and
                let the handle roll to have it worl like at "finish line slit-camera".
                Wouldn't it be possible to do the same with the Spheron - just remember to
                rewind the cable before you take the next shot ;-)

                My link in the former mail didn't work because the use special danish
                charecters in the file name - didn't knew it was possible at all!!
                http://www.skivetrav.com/m%c3%a5l_foto.htm

                But here you also find a collectin of fish line photos:
                http://www.onthemarktiming.com/results%202005/Big%20Red%2005/Big_Red_Invitational.htm

                - Flemming

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Ian Wood" <


                > It's a static camera with moving film.
                >
                > If it were rotating it would be the ground would be clear and the
                > cars would either be long blurs (if travelling in the same direction
                > as the camera) or very short blobs (if travelling against the camera).
                >
                > But it could be done with a Spheron or other scanning camera if you
                > turned the rotation motor off - might not be enough control over
                > speed, though.
                >
                > Ian
                >
                > On 2 Mar 2007, at 14:58, d9616 wrote:
                >
                >>
                >> Recently went to FOCUS on imaging exhibition at the NEC in Birmingham
                >> (UK) and saw this 360 camera by Spheron
                >>
                >> http://www.teamworkphoto.com/spheron.html
                >>
                >> My guess is that the NASCAR photos were taken with something similar
                >> with the 360 revolution matched to the average laptime of the cars,
                >> thus rendering the complete oval blurred whilst recording the cars as
                >> sharp.
                >>
                >> Just my 2p worth
                >>
                >> Dave H
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