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Problems with panoramas...

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  • Roger D Williams
    Just got back to Japan from our summer holiday in France, divided between the picturesque villages of the Alsace Wine Road, Strasbourg, and a few days in
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 21, 2013
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      Just got back to Japan from our summer holiday in France, divided between the picturesque villages of the Alsace Wine Road, Strasbourg, and a few days in Paris.

      I had problems stitching one panorama because a truck forced me off the road in the middle of the shoot and despite leaving a marker on the road it looks as if I didn't finish on quite the same spot... Masking came to the rescue and I don't think the patching shows. I was less lucky with one panorama that was interrupted by a very lovey-dovey young couple who weren't sure they wanted to appear in a panorama that would end up on the Internet. I retook the sequence but ended up one shot short... The gap is not as large as it might have been because the zenith and nadir shots helped fill it. But there's a sizable rectangular hole and somehow I think it's beyond my limited cloning skills even with the help of Photoshop's intelligent fill function.

      I've been relying on the excellent low-noise performance of my Pentax K-01, exposing for the highlights and boosting the shadows as necessary. This has been working pretty well, but I now know roughly where the limits are: I had to apply some fairly aggressive noise reduction on one or two panoramas taken on very bright days with dark shadows. I still prefer this to the ghosting I cannot avoid with bracketed HDR exposures. Sigh.

      I'll post a link to the series when it's finished. This will probably be the last done with my old faithful Peleng, as I have just got a home-made monopod foot with clear markers for 60-degree spaced shots. This will let me use my lovely Pentax 11-17mm zoom fisheye. Until now I've been unable to trust my judgement for hand-held shots other than 90 degrees apart, which meant using the Peleng. And I am getting too old for the heavier combination of tripod and NN3 click-stop panorama head. My wife rejects the Sherpa role, alas, even when I explain it's what being a photographic assistant really means. Grin.

      Roger W

      Sent from my iPad
    • Roger D Williams
      To see some of the panoramas mentioned in my recent post (below) please visit www.photosynth.net and search for, ahem, rogerama. This site is fully compatible
      Message 2 of 3 , Jul 22, 2013
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        To see some of the panoramas mentioned in my recent post (below) please visit www.photosynth.net and search for, ahem, rogerama.

        This site is fully compatible with iPhones and iPads, although it looks much better on the latter. Portrait orientation is best for viewing.

        I apologise if the colours look a little dim; I forgot to convert to sRGB before uploading, so they are all in Adobe RGB.

        I have a few more from the delightful villages of the Route des Vins, but they are proving very difficult to stitch and/or salvage.

        Roger W

        Sent from my iPad

        On Jul 21, 2013, at 6:15 PM, Roger D Williams <roger@...> wrote:

        > Just got back to Japan from our summer holiday in France, divided between the picturesque villages of the Alsace Wine Road, Strasbourg, and a few days in Paris.
        >
        > I had problems stitching one panorama because a truck forced me off the road in the middle of the shoot and despite leaving a marker on the road it looks as if I didn't finish on quite the same spot... Masking came to the rescue and I don't think the patching shows. I was less lucky with one panorama that was interrupted by a very lovey-dovey young couple who weren't sure they wanted to appear in a panorama that would end up on the Internet. I retook the sequence but ended up one shot short... The gap is not as large as it might have been because the zenith and nadir shots helped fill it. But there's a sizable rectangular hole and somehow I think it's beyond my limited cloning skills even with the help of Photoshop's intelligent fill function.
        >
        > I've been relying on the excellent low-noise performance of my Pentax K-01, exposing for the highlights and boosting the shadows as necessary. This has been working pretty well, but I now know roughly where the limits are: I had to apply some fairly aggressive noise reduction on one or two panoramas taken on very bright days with dark shadows. I still prefer this to the ghosting I cannot avoid with bracketed HDR exposures. Sigh.
        >
        > I'll post a link to the series when it's finished. This will probably be the last done with my old faithful Peleng, as I have just got a home-made monopod foot with clear markers for 60-degree spaced shots. This will let me use my lovely Pentax 11-17mm zoom fisheye. Until now I've been unable to trust my judgement for hand-held shots other than 90 degrees apart, which meant using the Peleng. And I am getting too old for the heavier combination of tripod and NN3 click-stop panorama head. My wife rejects the Sherpa role, alas, even when I explain it's what being a photographic assistant really means. Grin.
        >
        > Roger W
        >
        > Sent from my iPad
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > --
        >
        >
        >
      • John Riley
        ... Sounds like it should be old-style 3D cinema porn (rogering in the British sense , with the corny old in and out of the scree to show off the 3D.) Kind of
        Message 3 of 3 , Jul 22, 2013
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          On Jul 22, 2013, at 8:12 AM, Roger D Williams wrote:

          and search for, ahem, rogerama

          Sounds like it should be old-style 3D cinema porn (rogering in the British sense , with the corny old in and out of the scree to show off the 3D.)

          Kind of makes me miss the 70s.

          John Riley
          johnriley@...
          (h)864-461-3504
          (c)864-431-7075
          (w)864-503-5775
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