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Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: linear pano/mosaic of a city block elevation?

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  • Nathan Bennett
    Thank you everyone for the great ideas. This video idea looks interesting Manfred... They need it for a website banner so it could work ok. Time for testing,
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 13, 2013
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      Thank you everyone for the great ideas. 
      This video idea looks interesting Manfred... 
      They need it for a website banner so it could work ok.
      Time for testing, testing, testing.
      Cheers,
      Nathan Bennett
      www.nbphoto.com
      On Mar 13, 2013, at 3:32 PM, Manfred Kröger wrote:

      One could do a first try with a video camera, I think:

      Walk on the other side of the street and aim your camera on the buildings, camera rotated 90° so that it's filming in portrait orientation. Afterwards you use a software like VirtualDub to create BMPs, TIFs or JPGs from the frames. Crop the images so that only a very small strip from the center remains and feed those images into the panorama application of your choice for automatic control point detection. 

      By filming you get lots of images with a minimal effort. Unfortunately the resolution is not that great. But maybe that's enough?!


    • panovrx
      It will be easier to stitch if all your shots are parallel and at right angles to the facade opposite. There are similar requirements for shooting with camera
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 13, 2013
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        It will be easier to stitch if all your shots are parallel and at right angles to the facade opposite. There are similar requirements for shooting with camera arrays for lenticular print image sequences.
        It is possible to make all the shots parallel with camera tracking/stabilization software. For example the camera tracker feature in After Effects CS6.
        Here is a tutorial I wrote for using the Camera Tracker for lenticular image sequence alignment
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lenticular_art/message/2718

        PeterM


        --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Nathan Bennett <nbennettphoto@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thank you everyone for the great ideas.
        > This video idea looks interesting Manfred...
        > They need it for a website banner so it could work ok.
        > Time for testing, testing, testing.
        > Cheers,
        > Nathan Bennett
        > www.nbphoto.com
        > On Mar 13, 2013, at 3:32 PM, Manfred Kröger wrote:
        >
        > > One could do a first try with a video camera, I think:
        > >
        > > Walk on the other side of the street and aim your camera on the buildings, camera rotated 90° so that it's filming in portrait orientation. Afterwards you use a software like VirtualDub to create BMPs, TIFs or JPGs from the frames. Crop the images so that only a very small strip from the center remains and feed those images into the panorama application of your choice for automatic control point detection.
        > >
        > > By filming you get lots of images with a minimal effort. Unfortunately the resolution is not that great. But maybe that's enough?!
        >
      • panovrx
        My first reply went missing -- so sorry if this is a duplicate You will find it easier if you can parallelize all your shots. You can do this with camera
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 13, 2013
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          My first reply went missing -- so sorry if this is a duplicate
          You will find it easier if you can parallelize all your shots. You can do this with camera tracking/stabilization software. eg. the Camera Tracker in After Effects CS6. Here is a mini-tutorial I wrote for aligning image sequences for lenticular print creation (which has similar parallelism requirements to your case):
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lenticular_art/message/2718

          PeterM

          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Nathan Bennett <nbennettphoto@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thank you everyone for the great ideas.
          > This video idea looks interesting Manfred...
          > They need it for a website banner so it could work ok.
          > Time for testing, testing, testing.
          > Cheers,
          > Nathan Bennett
          > www.nbphoto.com
          > On Mar 13, 2013, at 3:32 PM, Manfred Kröger wrote:
          >
          > > One could do a first try with a video camera, I think:
          > >
          > > Walk on the other side of the street and aim your camera on the buildings, camera rotated 90° so that it's filming in portrait orientation. Afterwards you use a software like VirtualDub to create BMPs, TIFs or JPGs from the frames. Crop the images so that only a very small strip from the center remains and feed those images into the panorama application of your choice for automatic control point detection.
          > >
          > > By filming you get lots of images with a minimal effort. Unfortunately the resolution is not that great. But maybe that's enough?!
          >
        • michaelalearmonth
          This may be helpful: http://www4.telus.net/public/wexsessa/travo.html Mike Learmonth
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 14, 2013
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            This may be helpful:

            http://www4.telus.net/public/wexsessa/travo.html

            Mike Learmonth

            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Nathan Bennett <nbennettphoto@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello Group,
            >
            > Nathan Bennett here, I'm an interior and architectural photographer in the S.F. Bay Area. se. www.nbphoto.com
            >
            > I need to make a linear pano / mosaic of a city block elevation? Not by 'panning' a camera on a tripod from one static point.
            > (by moving the camera down the block and stitching vertical images together to create one long hopefully flat field image.)
            >
            >
            > How does one correct for parallax and the wonkyness of things in the foreground?
            > What programs do you use and how do you go about capturing the image in the 'best light'?
            >
            > ...Use a 'horizontal Plumb line', keep tripod height consistent and parallel, use Lasers,
            > shoot many vertical images and use only the center of each one (at 5-10" overlapping intervals), use XYZ program, etc.?...
            >
            > Thank you for any solution which would give professional results.
            >
            >
            > Nathan
            >
            >
            > NATHANAEL BENNETT PHOTOGRAPHY
            >
            > contact@...
            > www.nbphoto.com
            >
          • giant_klobasa_monster
            a BANNER? use photoshop. everything else is a time sink for the output you need.
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 14, 2013
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              a BANNER?

              use photoshop.

              everything else is a time sink for the output you need.



              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Nathan Bennett <nbennettphoto@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thank you everyone for the great ideas.
              > This video idea looks interesting Manfred...
              > They need it for a website banner so it could work ok.
              > Time for testing, testing, testing.
              > Cheers,
              > Nathan Bennett
              > www.nbphoto.com
              > On Mar 13, 2013, at 3:32 PM, Manfred Kröger wrote:
              >
              > > One could do a first try with a video camera, I think:
              > >
              > > Walk on the other side of the street and aim your camera on the buildings, camera rotated 90° so that it's filming in portrait orientation. Afterwards you use a software like VirtualDub to create BMPs, TIFs or JPGs from the frames. Crop the images so that only a very small strip from the center remains and feed those images into the panorama application of your choice for automatic control point detection.
              > >
              > > By filming you get lots of images with a minimal effort. Unfortunately the resolution is not that great. But maybe that's enough?!
              >
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