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Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: linear pano/mosaic of a city block elevation?

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  • Manfred Kröger
    One could do a first try with a video camera, I think: Walk on the other side of the street and aim your camera on the buildings, camera rotated 90° so that
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 13, 2013
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      One could do a first try with a video camera, I think:

      Walk on the other side of the street and aim your camera on the buildings, camera rotated 90° so that it's filming in portrait orientation. Afterwards you use a software like VirtualDub to create BMPs, TIFs or JPGs from the frames. Crop the images so that only a very small strip from the center remains and feed those images into the panorama application of your choice for automatic control point detection.

      By filming you get lots of images with a minimal effort. Unfortunately the resolution is not that great. But maybe that's enough?!

      On 13.03.2013 16:35, Scott Highton wrote:
       

      (Response sent previously)



      Linear panoramas can be tricky to stitch due to parallax problems.  They're easier if the subject (i.e. the building faces on the block) are all on a single plane with no foreground or background subjects at different distances (i.e. cars, light poles, fire hydrants, trees, other background buildings, etc.).  But that's rarely ever the case, so plan on lots – and I do mean LOTS – of post production work.

      Use as long a lens as you can (shoot with the camera in vertical format), and give yourself LOTS of overlap between images.  Then, when you stitch the images, use only the center portion of each image.  The smaller this portion is, the better your stitching results will be.  In an ideal world, you would connect thousands of single-pixel-wide columns together.  That's highly impractical, but the closer you can get to that ideal, the better.  (There actually are slit-scan camera rigs that do this.  The camera is set up on a track that moves at a precise speed for the camera-to-subject distance to expose each column of pixels – one pixel wide by several thousand high, and creates a perfect looking linear panorama.  Check out thesystems from Panoscan – www.panoscan.com  and Roundshot – www.roundshot.com  ).

      To do it with a traditional camera, however, you'll want to do some preliminary tests before you tackle the assignment.  It may seem possible, using the longest focal length practical, to shoot from the opposite side of the street, and get 1/3 to 1/2 of the frame overlapping by moving the camera 20 linear feet down the street for each shot.  I can almost assure you you'll be disappointed with the results.  So instead, take a shot every 10 feet, or every five feet, or every two feet, etc., and then crop each of these shots so only a narrow center column is left (wide enough so there's some overlap between the same-width center columns of the images on either side).  Try the stitching process with these combinations and see how your results look (PhotoMerge in Photoshop is worth a try).  This will give you a feel for what approach, distances, focal length, etc. you'll need for your assignment subject.

      When shooting, be sure to keep your camera level and square with the front faces of the buildings.  Shoot it like you'd shoot architectural images (a perspective control lens might help if you don't have much shooting distance to work with – but again, test this before hand).  And again, plan on doing a fair bit of retouching afterward.

      To be honest, these types of shots are a pain in the butt – they require a tremendous amount of work (or unique equipment) in order to get good results... and the client usually doesn't want to pay very much for the effort.

      Other options you might look into are 3D CAD renderings of the buildings which you simply map photos of the buildings onto.  For more insights on this, consider Autodesk's ImageModeler and Maya software (expensive).  For a lot of educational info on image mapping and 3D rendering, check out Paul Debevec's site at: http://www.pauldebevec.com/ )

      Best of luck,



      Scott Highton
      Author, Virtual Reality Photography


    • Nathan Bennett
      Thank you everyone for the great ideas. This video idea looks interesting Manfred... They need it for a website banner so it could work ok. Time for testing,
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 13, 2013
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        Thank you everyone for the great ideas. 
        This video idea looks interesting Manfred... 
        They need it for a website banner so it could work ok.
        Time for testing, testing, testing.
        Cheers,
        Nathan Bennett
        www.nbphoto.com
        On Mar 13, 2013, at 3:32 PM, Manfred Kröger wrote:

        One could do a first try with a video camera, I think:

        Walk on the other side of the street and aim your camera on the buildings, camera rotated 90° so that it's filming in portrait orientation. Afterwards you use a software like VirtualDub to create BMPs, TIFs or JPGs from the frames. Crop the images so that only a very small strip from the center remains and feed those images into the panorama application of your choice for automatic control point detection. 

        By filming you get lots of images with a minimal effort. Unfortunately the resolution is not that great. But maybe that's enough?!


      • panovrx
        It will be easier to stitch if all your shots are parallel and at right angles to the facade opposite. There are similar requirements for shooting with camera
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 13, 2013
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          It will be easier to stitch if all your shots are parallel and at right angles to the facade opposite. There are similar requirements for shooting with camera arrays for lenticular print image sequences.
          It is possible to make all the shots parallel with camera tracking/stabilization software. For example the camera tracker feature in After Effects CS6.
          Here is a tutorial I wrote for using the Camera Tracker for lenticular image sequence alignment
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lenticular_art/message/2718

          PeterM


          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Nathan Bennett <nbennettphoto@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thank you everyone for the great ideas.
          > This video idea looks interesting Manfred...
          > They need it for a website banner so it could work ok.
          > Time for testing, testing, testing.
          > Cheers,
          > Nathan Bennett
          > www.nbphoto.com
          > On Mar 13, 2013, at 3:32 PM, Manfred Kröger wrote:
          >
          > > One could do a first try with a video camera, I think:
          > >
          > > Walk on the other side of the street and aim your camera on the buildings, camera rotated 90° so that it's filming in portrait orientation. Afterwards you use a software like VirtualDub to create BMPs, TIFs or JPGs from the frames. Crop the images so that only a very small strip from the center remains and feed those images into the panorama application of your choice for automatic control point detection.
          > >
          > > By filming you get lots of images with a minimal effort. Unfortunately the resolution is not that great. But maybe that's enough?!
          >
        • panovrx
          My first reply went missing -- so sorry if this is a duplicate You will find it easier if you can parallelize all your shots. You can do this with camera
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 13, 2013
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            My first reply went missing -- so sorry if this is a duplicate
            You will find it easier if you can parallelize all your shots. You can do this with camera tracking/stabilization software. eg. the Camera Tracker in After Effects CS6. Here is a mini-tutorial I wrote for aligning image sequences for lenticular print creation (which has similar parallelism requirements to your case):
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/lenticular_art/message/2718

            PeterM

            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Nathan Bennett <nbennettphoto@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thank you everyone for the great ideas.
            > This video idea looks interesting Manfred...
            > They need it for a website banner so it could work ok.
            > Time for testing, testing, testing.
            > Cheers,
            > Nathan Bennett
            > www.nbphoto.com
            > On Mar 13, 2013, at 3:32 PM, Manfred Kröger wrote:
            >
            > > One could do a first try with a video camera, I think:
            > >
            > > Walk on the other side of the street and aim your camera on the buildings, camera rotated 90° so that it's filming in portrait orientation. Afterwards you use a software like VirtualDub to create BMPs, TIFs or JPGs from the frames. Crop the images so that only a very small strip from the center remains and feed those images into the panorama application of your choice for automatic control point detection.
            > >
            > > By filming you get lots of images with a minimal effort. Unfortunately the resolution is not that great. But maybe that's enough?!
            >
          • michaelalearmonth
            This may be helpful: http://www4.telus.net/public/wexsessa/travo.html Mike Learmonth
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 14, 2013
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              This may be helpful:

              http://www4.telus.net/public/wexsessa/travo.html

              Mike Learmonth

              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Nathan Bennett <nbennettphoto@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello Group,
              >
              > Nathan Bennett here, I'm an interior and architectural photographer in the S.F. Bay Area. se. www.nbphoto.com
              >
              > I need to make a linear pano / mosaic of a city block elevation? Not by 'panning' a camera on a tripod from one static point.
              > (by moving the camera down the block and stitching vertical images together to create one long hopefully flat field image.)
              >
              >
              > How does one correct for parallax and the wonkyness of things in the foreground?
              > What programs do you use and how do you go about capturing the image in the 'best light'?
              >
              > ...Use a 'horizontal Plumb line', keep tripod height consistent and parallel, use Lasers,
              > shoot many vertical images and use only the center of each one (at 5-10" overlapping intervals), use XYZ program, etc.?...
              >
              > Thank you for any solution which would give professional results.
              >
              >
              > Nathan
              >
              >
              > NATHANAEL BENNETT PHOTOGRAPHY
              >
              > contact@...
              > www.nbphoto.com
              >
            • giant_klobasa_monster
              a BANNER? use photoshop. everything else is a time sink for the output you need.
              Message 6 of 10 , Mar 14, 2013
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                a BANNER?

                use photoshop.

                everything else is a time sink for the output you need.



                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Nathan Bennett <nbennettphoto@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thank you everyone for the great ideas.
                > This video idea looks interesting Manfred...
                > They need it for a website banner so it could work ok.
                > Time for testing, testing, testing.
                > Cheers,
                > Nathan Bennett
                > www.nbphoto.com
                > On Mar 13, 2013, at 3:32 PM, Manfred Kröger wrote:
                >
                > > One could do a first try with a video camera, I think:
                > >
                > > Walk on the other side of the street and aim your camera on the buildings, camera rotated 90° so that it's filming in portrait orientation. Afterwards you use a software like VirtualDub to create BMPs, TIFs or JPGs from the frames. Crop the images so that only a very small strip from the center remains and feed those images into the panorama application of your choice for automatic control point detection.
                > >
                > > By filming you get lots of images with a minimal effort. Unfortunately the resolution is not that great. But maybe that's enough?!
                >
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