Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Trouble with PTgui and wide angle lens

Expand Messages
  • Jephotog
    Hi everyone, New to the group, but have worked with Panoramas in the past. I had used the Panofactory software for my previous project with success. Using
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 31, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi everyone,
      New to the group, but have worked with Panoramas in the past. I had
      used the Panofactory software for my previous project with success.
      Using that software was pretty much drag, drop and click. As I am
      starting to panoramas again i have chosen PTGui as my software
      this time as I hear of superior results from forums.

      Unfortunately I am having some trouble with PTGui. One is I am
      shooting with a Sigma 10-20 on an EOS 10d giving me an equivalent 16mm
      lens. I am having trouble getting images to line up. I am still
      experimenting with the nodal point, but are there any other clues to
      get PTGui to work with such a wide lens.

      Another problem I am having is sometimes PTGui places my images in a
      random order. An order other than they were shot at or that lines up
      the scene. Placing control points does not solve the allignment.

      I appreciate any advice to jumpstart my efforts into creating panoramas.
      Thanks
      JE
    • John Houghton
      ... PTGui should not have any particular trouble handling your lens. What type of panorama are you aiming to generate? 360 degree cylindrical,
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 31, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Jephotog" <jephotog@...> wrote:
        >
        >I am having trouble getting images to line up. I am still
        > experimenting with the nodal point, but are there any other clues to
        > get PTGui to work with such a wide lens.

        PTGui should not have any particular trouble handling your lens. What
        type of panorama are you aiming to generate? 360 degree cylindrical,
        <360 cylindrical, or 360x180 spherical? I've emailed some general
        instructions for manual stitching if the auto facilities are not
        working adequately. There are tutorials on the wiki that may help at:
        http://wiki.panotools.org/Tutorials

        John
      • Jephotog
        Right now I am just trying to do some 360 cylindricals but would like to build a spherical one soon. I have just read that the nodal point on these lenses are
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 31, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Right now I am just trying to do some 360 cylindricals but would like
          to build a spherical one soon. I have just read that the nodal point
          on these lenses are further forward than I am used to on my previous
          lenses. I will try moving the camera back on the Pano head and see
          what I get.

          It is the fine tuning I am having a little trouble with. Is the only
          way to do this is with the control point editor? I have one pano that
          has 2 images that do not quite overlap. Is it possible to manipulate
          these images even though there is no overlap? It is not a 360 image
          anyways, if I can get it close, I can clean up and rebuild the
          transition in photoshop.
        • Pat Swovelin
          ... Go here for info on the NPP of your lens (you ll have to figure out the Tripod mount length yourself. Or finding the NPP tutorials you can go here (for a
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 31, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Jephotog wrote:
            > Right now I am just trying to do some 360 cylindricals but would like
            > to build a spherical one soon. I have just read that the nodal point
            > on these lenses are further forward than I am used to on my previous
            > lenses. I will try moving the camera back on the Pano head and see
            > what I get.

            Go here for info on the NPP of your lens (you'll have to figure out the
            Tripod mount length yourself. Or finding the NPP tutorials you can go
            here (for a high tech version)
            http://michel.thoby.free.fr/Laser_pointer_intro.html or here (for the
            Homer Simpson low tech version)
            http://dgrin.smugmug.com/gallery/2114189/1/109263193

            > It is the fine tuning I am having a little trouble with. Is the only
            > way to do this is with the control point editor? I have one pano that
            > has 2 images that do not quite overlap. Is it possible to manipulate
            > these images even though there is no overlap? It is not a 360 image
            > anyways, if I can get it close, I can clean up and rebuild the
            > transition in photoshop.




            Pat Swovelin
            Cool Guy @ Large
          • Robert C. Fisher
            I much prefer the low tech solution, less tools and crap to do a simple thing like find the nodal point. I think far too many photographers stress over the
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 31, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              I much prefer the low tech solution, less tools and crap to do a
              simple thing like find the nodal point. I think far too many
              photographers stress over the nodal point, just set up do the routeen
              and you are done. It's a pretty simple procedure you have to admit.
              There are several low tech ways to do it including using a chucnk of
              pipe or a couple of sticks. I prefer a rod or stick about 2-3 inches
              from the front of the lens (for real wide lenses) and use a telephone
              pole or fence post thats at infinity. If you are lining up a fisheye
              lens, the Nodal point changes along the front of the lens so just
              line up quick in center then spend time getting the right and left
              sides to line up.

              Just my .02

              On Dec 31, 2006, at 3:18 PM, Pat Swovelin wrote:

              > Jephotog wrote:
              > > Right now I am just trying to do some 360 cylindricals but would
              > like
              > > to build a spherical one soon. I have just read that the nodal point
              > > on these lenses are further forward than I am used to on my previous
              > > lenses. I will try moving the camera back on the Pano head and see
              > > what I get.
              >
              > Go here for info on the NPP of your lens (you'll have to figure out
              > the
              > Tripod mount length yourself. Or finding the NPP tutorials you can go
              > here (for a high tech version)
              > http://michel.thoby.free.fr/Laser_pointer_intro.html or here (for the
              > Homer Simpson low tech version)
              > http://dgrin.smugmug.com/gallery/2114189/1/109263193
              >
              > > It is the fine tuning I am having a little trouble with. Is the only
              > > way to do this is with the control point editor? I have one pano
              > that
              > > has 2 images that do not quite overlap. Is it possible to manipulate
              > > these images even though there is no overlap? It is not a 360 image
              > > anyways, if I can get it close, I can clean up and rebuild the
              > > transition in photoshop.
              >
              > Pat Swovelin
              > Cool Guy @ Large
              Cheers
              Robert C. Fisher
              VR Photography/Cinematography
            • John Houghton
              ... Jordan, one way to deal with this is to make use of the fact that all the images have the same pitch and roll values - assuming you used a tripod and pano
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 31, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Jephotog" <jephotog@...> wrote:
                >
                > I have one pano that has 2 images that do not quite overlap. Is it
                > possible to manipulate these images even though there is no overlap?
                > It is not a 360 image anyways,

                Jordan, one way to deal with this is to make use of the fact that all
                the images have the same pitch and roll values - assuming you used a
                tripod and pano head. You should start by aligning the images
                roughly by hand using the panorama editor window. Pay particular
                attention to the two that don't quite overlap, and align those as
                accurately as you can.

                Assign control points, and for the initial optimization, check the
                link pitch and roll boxes in the advanced features of the optimizer
                tab. Optimize y,r,p on all images except uncheck yaw on the two non
                overlapping images. (Also include lens parameter b for
                optimization). Then uncheck the link pitch and roll boxes. Uncheck
                y,p,r for the two non overlapping images to anchor them both, and
                optimize y,p,r on all the other images.

                After, optimization and generating the final panorama image, you can
                if necessary fine tune the alignment of the two halves of the
                panorama in Photoshop and clone over the gap. If you take care not
                to crop the image, you can input the edited image to PTGui with lens
                parameters set to the projection and fov of the panorama image to
                correct verticals and a wavy horizon. This might be necessary if the
                vertical rotation axis of the panorama head was not quite vertical.

                John
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.