Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: How to create a high resolution image of a hammer

Expand Messages
  • David
    I ve used Zerene stacker for many stacked macro photos. Form all the reviews I ve been able to find it is one of the best. I also have an extra Melles Griot
    Message 1 of 15 , Jan 25, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I've used Zerene stacker for many stacked macro photos. Form all the reviews I've been able to find it is one of the best.

      I also have an extra Melles Griot telecentric lens if anyone is interested. Here is a pan and stitched sample (not stacked):
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/dbur971/4732547090/in/set-72157627813468144

      Here is what the lens looks like:
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/dbur971/4732535550/in/photostream

      Front of the lens is about 3" across, I use it with 55mm Nikkor macro lens as base lens. Seems to work with the Canon 50mm as well.

      It may require more images than you want for your hammer, but doable.

      David B


      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Erik Krause wrote:
      >
      > Am 23.01.2013 11:44, schrieb johntunley:
      > > I don't at present have a focus slider so decided to give lens focus
      > > adjustment a try and produced two more stitched images at different
      > > focus planes..
      >
      > Inspired by your question I searched a bit and found Zerene Stacker, a
      > program made by a (former) member of this group, Rik Littlefield. There
      > is a lot of information at http://zerenesystems.com/ and interestingly
      > he favors the focus ring method.
      >
      > He is also administrator at http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/ where
      > you can find a real wealth of information, including how to create and
      > use a telecentric lens system, which allows for perspective-less focus
      > stacking and stitching.
      >
      > --
      > Erik Krause
      > http://www.erik-krause.de
      >
    • Erik Krause
      ... Just for the records: There are several combinations of standard lenses and standard achromatic close-up lenses that make up a (near) telecentric combo:
      Message 2 of 15 , Jan 26, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Am 25.01.2013 11:43, schrieb johntunley:
        > Thanks for the link to the telecentric lens articles which are worth
        > a more detailed look, unfortunately timescales prevent that just
        > now.

        Just for the records: There are several combinations of standard lenses
        and standard achromatic close-up lenses that make up a (near)
        telecentric combo: f.e the Canon EF 100mm 1:2.8 IS USM macro lens
        together with a 5dpt close-up lens as well as the EF 100-400 1:4.5-5.6
        IS USM (at 400mm) with a 2dpt close-up lens. Both must be used at near
        focus.

        I've discovered both accidentally when playing around with close-up
        lenses I happen to own. For the EF 100mm I used a step down ring
        (67->58mm) which doesn't cause vignetting and allows to use my
        collection of 58mm filters. It doesn't work with the older Canon 100mm
        macro lenses though...

        The 2dpt close-up lens is recycled from a 500mm f/8 Beroflex telephoto
        lens (where the back lens group was blinded by bad lens fungus). I use
        it with a step down ring (77->72mm). I mention this because the distance
        between close-up lens and base lens is critical.

        In fact any combination of close-up lens and base lens should work if
        some kind of extension tube is used which places the focal point of the
        close-up lens in the entrance pupil of the base lens, which effectively
        projects the entrance pupil and hence the no-parallax-point at infinity
        behind the camera.

        --
        Erik Krause
        http://www.erik-krause.de
      • Gerhard Killesreiter
        ... Hash: SHA1 ... Is there a tutorial how I can determine which add-on lens I need to buy for a given macro lens? I have a Sigma 105mm macro. Cheers, Gerhard
        Message 3 of 15 , Jan 26, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
          Hash: SHA1


          > In fact any combination of close-up lens and base lens should work
          > if some kind of extension tube is used which places the focal point
          > of the close-up lens in the entrance pupil of the base lens, which
          > effectively projects the entrance pupil and hence the
          > no-parallax-point at infinity behind the camera.


          Is there a tutorial how I can determine which add-on lens I need to
          buy for a given macro lens?

          I have a Sigma 105mm macro.

          Cheers,
          Gerhard


          -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
          Version: GnuPG v1.4.11 (GNU/Linux)

          iEYEARECAAYFAlED71AACgkQfg6TFvELooRDnwCglMgd/q3DvALvmapmUsYqVwI8
          dckAoLwQJo3t5TnCjui8Tu38/rvYlPaH
          =LlRe
          -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
        • Erik Krause
          ... I don t know of any. However, it s not limited to macro lenses, any lens will do as a base lens. First determine where the no-parallax-point (NPP) of the
          Message 4 of 15 , Jan 26, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Am 26.01.2013 15:59, schrieb Gerhard Killesreiter:
            >> >In fact any combination of close-up lens and base lens should work
            >> >if some kind of extension tube is used which places the focal point
            >> >of the close-up lens in the entrance pupil of the base lens, which
            >> >effectively projects the entrance pupil and hence the
            >> >no-parallax-point at infinity behind the camera.
            >
            > Is there a tutorial how I can determine which add-on lens I need to
            > buy for a given macro lens?

            I don't know of any. However, it's not limited to macro lenses, any lens
            will do as a base lens. First determine where the no-parallax-point
            (NPP) of the base lens is just as for panorama shooting. Next calculate
            the focal length of the close-up lens, it's 1/dpt in meters. So if it
            has 2 dpt (diopters) the focal length is 50cm. Place the close-up lens
            by it's focal length in front of the NPP of the base lens. In our
            example you should place it 50cm in front of the NPP.
            You can even use an inverted other lens if you don't have a close-up
            lens, like Rik did in his setup:
            http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1032
            In this case the correct position must be found by try and error

            Another combo can be found here:
            http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=18323

            For more one telecentric macro shooting search Rik's page for
            "telecentr": http://janrik.net/RiksLinks.html

            --
            Erik Krause
            http://www.erik-krause.de
          • Lionel
            Companies like JD Edwards, Melles Griot and other have some tutorials that explain exactly what telecentricity is. Based on my research on this topic, your
            Message 5 of 15 , Jan 26, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Companies like JD Edwards, Melles Griot and other have some tutorials that explain exactly what "telecentricity" is. Based on my research on this topic, your best resource will be the links to photomacrography.net that were posted earlier. As far as I can tell, this is relatively novel ground for photographers in general; Rik Littlefield's articles are the best I've found.

              Regards
              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Gerhard Killesreiter wrote:
              >
              > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
              > Hash: SHA1
              >
              >
              > > In fact any combination of close-up lens and base lens should work
              > > if some kind of extension tube is used which places the focal point
              > > of the close-up lens in the entrance pupil of the base lens, which
              > > effectively projects the entrance pupil and hence the
              > > no-parallax-point at infinity behind the camera.
              >
              >
              > Is there a tutorial how I can determine which add-on lens I need to
              > buy for a given macro lens?
              >
              > I have a Sigma 105mm macro.
              >
              > Cheers,
              > Gerhard
              >
              >
              > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
              > Version: GnuPG v1.4.11 (GNU/Linux)
              >
              > iEYEARECAAYFAlED71AACgkQfg6TFvELooRDnwCglMgd/q3DvALvmapmUsYqVwI8
              > dckAoLwQJo3t5TnCjui8Tu38/rvYlPaH
              > =LlRe
              > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
              >
            • Rick Drew
              I ve also used my desktop scanner. My old model would do legal size scans up to 4800 dpi. I d scan old coins at some phenomenal resolution. From:
              Message 6 of 15 , Jan 26, 2013
              • 0 Attachment

                I’ve also used my desktop scanner. My old model would do legal size scans up to 4800 dpi. I’d scan old coins at some phenomenal resolution.

                 

                From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lionel
                Sent: 2013-01-26 3:52 PM
                To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Re: How to create a high resolution image of a hammer

                 

                 


                Companies like JD Edwards, Melles Griot and other have some tutorials that explain exactly what "telecentricity" is. Based on my research on this topic, your best resource will be the links to photomacrography.net that were posted earlier. As far as I can tell, this is relatively novel ground for photographers in general; Rik Littlefield's articles are the best I've found.

                Regards

                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Gerhard Killesreiter wrote:
                >
                > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
                > Hash: SHA1
                >
                >
                > > In fact any combination of close-up lens and base lens should work
                > > if some kind of extension tube is used which places the focal point
                > > of the close-up lens in the entrance pupil of the base lens, which
                > > effectively projects the entrance pupil and hence the
                > > no-parallax-point at infinity behind the camera.
                >
                >
                > Is there a tutorial how I can determine which add-on lens I need to
                > buy for a given macro lens?
                >
                > I have a Sigma 105mm macro.
                >
                > Cheers,
                > Gerhard
                >
                >
                > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
                > Version: GnuPG v1.4.11 (GNU/Linux)
                >
                > iEYEARECAAYFAlED71AACgkQfg6TFvELooRDnwCglMgd/q3DvALvmapmUsYqVwI8
                > dckAoLwQJo3t5TnCjui8Tu38/rvYlPaH
                > =LlRe
                > -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
                >

              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.