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Re: [PanoToolsNG] Panos down to earth...

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  • Michel Thoby
    Thomas shooting principle (that proposes to use a horizontal monopod) is sound and works. At least, a variant of it did work fine for me (I think):
    Message 1 of 19 , Jan 18, 2013
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      Thomas' shooting principle (that proposes to use a horizontal monopod) is sound and works. At least, a variant of it did work fine for me (I think):
      I have paradoxically used the huge Manfrotto 269HDBU 7.5 m long pole! 
      The legs were kept folded and the mast was partially extended (about 4 or 5 meters of the bigger tubes only). The whole thing was lying sideways on the ground. The camera was mounted on a NN 5L at the tip of the pole (as usual). The fisheye lens NNP was thus maintained fixed in 3D space, yet kept at about 15-20 cm above the ground just high enough to allow the camera to rotate around the horizontal pole axis: a small block of wood supported the upper part of the pole at about one meter from the camera.
      Lot of room is needed when doing that way. Other means have to be devised and deployed if available space is scarce. An example: http://michel.thoby.free.fr/Scholtes/Making-of.html

      Michel

      Le 18 janv. 2013 à 10:22, Thomas Bredenfeld a écrit :

       

      i think it's not off topic at all :-)

      needed to think about the same subject some time ago for a project
      planning and made some tests.

      inverting the center column and taking two panos with 60 deg rotation
      offset in itself isn't a bad idea, but practically not achievable with a
      sufficient precision, especially when the floor isn't a flat surface.

      best what i found out is a tripod and a horizontal or downwards tilted
      monopod mounted on it. so the tripod is farer away and easier to
      retouch, depending on the background behind the tripod. capturing one
      panorama is enough.

      some tipps/remarks:
      - if you shoot outdoor be sure to have a 90 deg alignment of the monopod
      related to the sun and the shadows.
      - with a fisheye this method needs 4 shots and the down shot covers the
      nadir in the important image area with best quality.
      - the longer the monopod, the better.
      - dependent on the length you may need a counterweight (which is hardly
      visible in the panorama because it's behind the tripod).

      maybe this helps a little bit ;-)

      best
      thomas

      Am 18.01.13 01:16, schrieb Gerhard Killesreiter:
      > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
      > Hash: SHA1
      >
      > Hi there,
      >
      > I hope I a not off topic.
      >
      > I would like to create a pano that is close to the ground. The minimal
      > distance my fisheye can do is about 20cm, so about that close.
      >
      > The idea is to invert the middle column of the tripod and turn the
      > camera on its head. I can take three images around, but then I'll have
      > the legs of the tripod (and their shadow) in all of them. I think I
      > would need a 2nd set of images with the tripod rotated by 60°.
      >
      > Now my problem: How to I ensure that the camera is at exactly the same
      > place after rotating? I would think that this matters a lot since the
      > camera is close to the ground.
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Gerhard


    • panokaemena
      This here http://www.worldwidepanorama.org/worldwidepanorama/wwp309/html/WillyKaemena-5368.html was done freehand with a monopod shortly above ground Willy
      Message 2 of 19 , Jan 18, 2013
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        This here http://www.worldwidepanorama.org/worldwidepanorama/wwp309/html/WillyKaemena-5368.html  was done freehand with a monopod shortly above ground

        Willy

        On Jan 18, 2013, at 1:16, Gerhard Killesreiter <gerhard@...> wrote:

         

        -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
        Hash: SHA1

        Hi there,

        I hope I a not off topic.

        I would like to create a pano that is close to the ground. The minimal
        distance my fisheye can do is about 20cm, so about that close.

        The idea is to invert the middle column of the tripod and turn the
        camera on its head. I can take three images around, but then I'll have
        the legs of the tripod (and their shadow) in all of them. I think I
        would need a 2nd set of images with the tripod rotated by 60°.

        Now my problem: How to I ensure that the camera is at exactly the same
        place after rotating? I would think that this matters a lot since the
        camera is close to the ground.

        Cheers,
        Gerhard
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      • Gerhard Killesreiter
        ... Hash: SHA1 ... Thank you, Thomas! ... I have paradoxically used the huge Manfrotto 269HDBU 7.5 m long pole! I was looking for something more portable. 8) I
        Message 3 of 19 , Jan 18, 2013
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          Am 18.01.2013 12:12, schrieb Michel Thoby:

          > Thomas' shooting principle (that proposes to use a horizontal
          > monopod) is sound and works.

          Thank you, Thomas!

          > At least, a variant of it did work fine for me (I think):
          > http://worldwidepanorama.org/worldwidepanorama/wwp309/html/MichelThoby-5350.html
          >
          >
          I have paradoxically used the huge Manfrotto 269HDBU 7.5 m long pole!

          I was looking for something more portable. 8)

          I have one of the shorter Manfrotto monopods, I'll see if that works
          and how big the tripod will appear in the image.

          > The legs were kept folded and the mast was partially extended
          > (about 4 or 5 meters of the bigger tubes only). The whole thing was
          > lying sideways on the ground. The camera was mounted on a NN 5L at
          > the tip of the pole (as usual). The fisheye lens NNP was thus
          > maintained fixed in 3D space, yet kept at about 15-20 cm above the
          > ground just high enough to allow the camera to rotate around the
          > horizontal pole axis: a small block of wood supported the upper
          > part of the pole at about one meter from the camera.


          how did you get rid of the block in the picture?

          > Lot of room is needed when doing that way. Other means have to be
          > devised and deployed if available space is scarce. An example:
          > http://michel.thoby.free.fr/Scholtes/Making-of.html


          Now I am hungry...

          Cheers,
          Gerhard
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        • Thomas Bredenfeld
          something else came in my mind. succeeded in finding it here on the list :-) http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/PanoToolsNG/message/52419
          Message 4 of 19 , Jan 18, 2013
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            something else came in my mind. succeeded in finding it here on the list :-)

            http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/PanoToolsNG/message/52419

            http://indiavrtours.com/pic/low_shot.jpg

            maybe it's interesting for you...

            keep us posted about your experiments :-)

            best
            thomas


            Am 18.01.13 12:53, schrieb Gerhard Killesreiter:
            > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
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            >
            > Am 18.01.2013 12:12, schrieb Michel Thoby:
            >
            > > Thomas' shooting principle (that proposes to use a horizontal
            > > monopod) is sound and works.
            >
            > Thank you, Thomas!
            >
            > > At least, a variant of it did work fine for me (I think):
            > >
            > http://worldwidepanorama.org/worldwidepanorama/wwp309/html/MichelThoby-5350.html
            > >
            > >
            > I have paradoxically used the huge Manfrotto 269HDBU 7.5 m long pole!
            >
            > I was looking for something more portable. 8)
            >
            > I have one of the shorter Manfrotto monopods, I'll see if that works
            > and how big the tripod will appear in the image.
            >
            > > The legs were kept folded and the mast was partially extended
            > > (about 4 or 5 meters of the bigger tubes only). The whole thing was
            > > lying sideways on the ground. The camera was mounted on a NN 5L at
            > > the tip of the pole (as usual). The fisheye lens NNP was thus
            > > maintained fixed in 3D space, yet kept at about 15-20 cm above the
            > > ground just high enough to allow the camera to rotate around the
            > > horizontal pole axis: a small block of wood supported the upper
            > > part of the pole at about one meter from the camera.
            >
            > how did you get rid of the block in the picture?
            >
            > > Lot of room is needed when doing that way. Other means have to be
            > > devised and deployed if available space is scarce. An example:
            > > http://michel.thoby.free.fr/Scholtes/Making-of.html
            >
            > Now I am hungry...
            >
            > Cheers,
            > Gerhard
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            >
          • Mark D. Fink
            I can t remember if it was Yuval Levy or Andras Frenyo who had a weighted disc that they put beneath their camera with a short bolt to attach to the camera,
            Message 5 of 19 , Jan 18, 2013
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              I can't remember if it was Yuval Levy or Andras Frenyo who had a weighted
              disc that they put beneath their camera with a short bolt to attach to the
              camera, but I do remember seeing it several years ago in NYC. That got them
              just a few inches off the ground, or tabletop if that is the location you
              are looking for. There was just the nadir to patch then, and that could be
              shot handheld.

              Mark

              -----Original Message-----
              From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of Gerhard Killesreiter
              Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2013 7:17 PM
              To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Panos down to earth...

              -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
              Hash: SHA1

              Hi there,

              I hope I a not off topic.

              I would like to create a pano that is close to the ground. The minimal
              distance my fisheye can do is about 20cm, so about that close.

              The idea is to invert the middle column of the tripod and turn the
              camera on its head. I can take three images around, but then I'll have
              the legs of the tripod (and their shadow) in all of them. I think I
              would need a 2nd set of images with the tripod rotated by 60°.

              Now my problem: How to I ensure that the camera is at exactly the same
              place after rotating? I would think that this matters a lot since the
              camera is close to the ground.

              Cheers,
              Gerhard
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              ------------------------------------

              --
            • Sacha Griffin
              If you don’t mind the extra photoshop work or room for errors.. you system should be ok. I use a plumb from the edge of the lens to place a dime. Then you
              Message 6 of 19 , Jan 18, 2013
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                If you don’t mind the extra photoshop work or room for errors.. you system should be ok.

                I use a plumb from the edge of the lens to place a dime. Then you can re-match position easily. You’ll also need to notate the height on the line.

                 

                Better would be add an extension the center column and heavy weight the tripod to extend back over. This will put the areas to retouch much farther away and reduce the parallax error you introduced by repositioning, and reduce the number of edges to worry about.

                 

                Best Regards,

                 

                Sacha Griffin

                Southern Digital Solutions LLC  - Atlanta, Georgia

                http://www.seeit360.com

                http://twitter.com/SeeIt360

                http://www.facebook.com/SeeIt360

                IM: sachagriffin007@...

                Office: 404-551-4275

                 

                 

                From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Gerhard Killesreiter
                Sent: Thursday, January 17, 2013 7:17 PM
                To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Panos down to earth...

                 

                 

                -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
                Hash: SHA1

                Hi there,

                I hope I a not off topic.

                I would like to create a pano that is close to the ground. The minimal
                distance my fisheye can do is about 20cm, so about that close.

                The idea is to invert the middle column of the tripod and turn the
                camera on its head. I can take three images around, but then I'll have
                the legs of the tripod (and their shadow) in all of them. I think I
                would need a 2nd set of images with the tripod rotated by 60°.

                Now my problem: How to I ensure that the camera is at exactly the same
                place after rotating? I would think that this matters a lot since the
                camera is close to the ground.

                Cheers,
                Gerhard
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              • erik_leeman
                The business end of that horizontal pole could also look something like this: This way you get
                Message 7 of 19 , Jan 18, 2013
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                  The business end of that horizontal pole could also look something like this:

                  <http://www.flickr.com/photos/erik-nl/6059502647/in/photostream>

                  This way you get your zenith and nadir where they usually are, something I prefer in most cases. Downside might be that you have to get close enough to the camera to turn it after each shot.

                  I use the strongest Gitzo monopod I could get, and made an adapter to mount it horizontally on my tripod (with a counterweight). Do NOT use a Manfrotto monopod with a plastic camera plate (all of them I guess), it will flex and simply is not strong enough.

                  Cheers!

                  Erik Leeman

                  <http://www.erikleeman.com>


                  --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Michel Thoby wrote:
                  >
                  > Thomas' shooting principle (that proposes to use a horizontal monopod) is sound and works. At least, a variant of it did work fine for me (I think):
                  > http://worldwidepanorama.org/worldwidepanorama/wwp309/html/MichelThoby-5350.html
                  > I have paradoxically used the huge Manfrotto 269HDBU 7.5 m long pole!
                  > The legs were kept folded and the mast was partially extended (about 4 or 5 meters of the bigger tubes only). The whole thing was lying sideways on the ground. The camera was mounted on a NN 5L at the tip of the pole (as usual). The fisheye lens NNP was thus maintained fixed in 3D space, yet kept at about 15-20 cm above the ground just high enough to allow the camera to rotate around the horizontal pole axis: a small block of wood supported the upper part of the pole at about one meter from the camera.
                  > Lot of room is needed when doing that way. Other means have to be devised and deployed if available space is scarce. An example: http://michel.thoby.free.fr/Scholtes/Making-of.html
                  >
                  > Michel
                • Uri
                  ... I would build a simple, short philopod - tie a short piece of string around the no-parallax point of the lens and dangle some pointy weight from it. mount
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jan 18, 2013
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                    --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Gerhard Killesreiter wrote:

                    > I would like to create a pano that is close to the ground. The minimal
                    > distance my fisheye can do is about 20cm, so about that close.
                    >
                    > The idea is to invert the middle column of the tripod and turn the
                    > camera on its head. I can take three images around, but then I'll have
                    > the legs of the tripod (and their shadow) in all of them. I think I
                    > would need a 2nd set of images with the tripod rotated by 60°.
                    >
                    > Now my problem: How to I ensure that the camera is at exactly the same
                    > place after rotating? I would think that this matters a lot since the
                    > camera is close to the ground.

                    I would build a simple, short philopod - tie a short piece of string around the no-parallax point of the lens and dangle some pointy weight from it. mount the camera so that the pointy weight is very close the ground. Mark that spot. Now you can shoot, reposition the camera around that spot at whatever angle you want to use, repeat until done.

                    Another idea is to stick a central column of an old tripod and into the ground and mount your pano head on it.
                  • L.D.I. Felipe B. González
                    I´ve done that height with a custom lens ring and a mini tripod: http://flic.kr/p/6pEgyB 2013/1/18 Uri ... -- L.D.I. Felipe B. González C.
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jan 18, 2013
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                      I´ve done that height with a custom lens ring and a mini tripod: http://flic.kr/p/6pEgyB


                      2013/1/18 Uri <uri@...>
                       



                      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Gerhard Killesreiter wrote:

                      > I would like to create a pano that is close to the ground. The minimal
                      > distance my fisheye can do is about 20cm, so about that close.
                      >
                      > The idea is to invert the middle column of the tripod and turn the
                      > camera on its head. I can take three images around, but then I'll have
                      > the legs of the tripod (and their shadow) in all of them. I think I
                      > would need a 2nd set of images with the tripod rotated by 60°.
                      >
                      > Now my problem: How to I ensure that the camera is at exactly the same
                      > place after rotating? I would think that this matters a lot since the
                      > camera is close to the ground.

                      I would build a simple, short philopod - tie a short piece of string around the no-parallax point of the lens and dangle some pointy weight from it. mount the camera so that the pointy weight is very close the ground. Mark that spot. Now you can shoot, reposition the camera around that spot at whatever angle you want to use, repeat until done.

                      Another idea is to stick a central column of an old tripod and into the ground and mount your pano head on it.




                      --
                      L.D.I. Felipe B. González C.
                      felipe@...
                      1998-5246
                      www.fpk.com.mx
                      http://recorridosvirtuales.wordpress.com/

                      Socio Director Recorridos Virtuales www.recorridosvirtuales.com
                    • Erik Krause
                      ... This one was done with my standard panorama head and a modified slik mini tripod: http://pano.erik-krause.de/beginning/spring_qt.flash I replaced the
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jan 18, 2013
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                        Am 18.01.2013 01:16, schrieb Gerhard Killesreiter:
                        > I would like to create a pano that is close to the ground. The minimal
                        > distance my fisheye can do is about 20cm, so about that close.

                        This one was done with my standard panorama head and a modified slik
                        mini tripod: http://pano.erik-krause.de/beginning/spring_qt.flash

                        I replaced the center column of the tripod with one with a simple 3/4"
                        screw mount instead of the original head. Then I mounted my panorama
                        head <http://erik-krause.de/panohead/dscn3507_en.htm> directly on the
                        center column instead of the reversed ball head. The nadir shot was done
                        hand held. Some photoshop work was needed...

                        --
                        Erik Krause
                        http://www.erik-krause.de
                      • Yazan Sboul
                        Not sure if a better solution has already been offered or not, but I simply attached my atome panhead to a heavy base made from a jam jar filled with plaster.
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jan 19, 2013
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                          Not sure if a better solution has already been offered or not, but I simply attached my atome panhead to a heavy base made from a jam jar filled with plaster. The atome fits snugly and can be detached (it just fits into the hole - no screws required), the weight of the plaster keeps the camera from tipping over and allows for turning the panohead without moving camera position. The small base can fit almost anywhere, I usually use it to take shots on restaurant tables but its been in the fridge, on shelves, and on car seats. 

                          Y.S


                          > To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                          > From: erik.krause@...
                          > Date: Fri, 18 Jan 2013 20:28:59 +0100
                          > Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Re: Panos down to earth...
                          >
                          > Am 18.01.2013 01:16, schrieb Gerhard Killesreiter:
                          > > I would like to create a pano that is close to the ground. The minimal
                          > > distance my fisheye can do is about 20cm, so about that close.
                          >
                          > This one was done with my standard panorama head and a modified slik
                          > mini tripod: http://pano.erik-krause.de/beginning/spring_qt.flash
                          >
                          > I replaced the center column of the tripod with one with a simple 3/4"
                          > screw mount instead of the original head. Then I mounted my panorama
                          > head <http://erik-krause.de/panohead/dscn3507_en.htm> directly on the
                          > center column instead of the reversed ball head. The nadir shot was done
                          > hand held. Some photoshop work was needed...
                          >
                          > --
                          > Erik Krause
                          > http://www.erik-krause.de
                          >
                          >
                          > ------------------------------------
                          >
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                        • jrgen_schrader
                          You didn t specify how deep you want to get and what the ground is made of. Given the right circumstances something like this can easily be achieved
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jan 23, 2013
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                            You didn't specify how "deep" you want to get and what the ground is made of. Given the right circumstances something like this can easily be achieved http://s3.bavaria360.de.s3.amazonaws.com/mushroom/pilz.html




                            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Gerhard Killesreiter wrote:
                            >
                            > -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
                            > Hash: SHA1
                            >
                            > Hi there,
                            >
                            > I hope I a not off topic.
                            >
                            > I would like to create a pano that is close to the ground. The minimal
                            > distance my fisheye can do is about 20cm, so about that close.
                            >
                            > The idea is to invert the middle column of the tripod and turn the
                            > camera on its head. I can take three images around, but then I'll have
                            > the legs of the tripod (and their shadow) in all of them. I think I
                            > would need a 2nd set of images with the tripod rotated by 60°.
                            >
                            > Now my problem: How to I ensure that the camera is at exactly the same
                            > place after rotating? I would think that this matters a lot since the
                            > camera is close to the ground.
                            >
                            > Cheers,
                            > Gerhard
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                            > =KKMc
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                            >
                          • Gerhard Killesreiter
                            ... Hash: SHA1 ... Great picture! That s about the distance I was thinking of, yes. Is there a making of ? I also wish to thank the other contributors. The
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jan 23, 2013
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                              Am 23.01.2013 11:06, schrieb jrgen_schrader:
                              > You didn't specify how "deep" you want to get and what the ground
                              > is made of. Given the right circumstances something like this can
                              > easily be achieved
                              > http://s3.bavaria360.de.s3.amazonaws.com/mushroom/pilz.html

                              Great picture!

                              That's about the distance I was thinking of, yes.

                              Is there a "making of"?

                              I also wish to thank the other contributors.

                              The device used for creating the snake pano looks very interesting. It
                              appears it is custom made, though.

                              Regarding the comments a la "if you do not mind a litte photoshop
                              work". I do mind, I don't have talent or patience for this. :(

                              So I would prefer a method where I can feed the images into Hugin and
                              then get a pano out.

                              I was also thinking about methods that involve a mirror ball, but the
                              balls that are available are mostly not of good optical quality and
                              also, the camera would be in all the images unless I don't fotograph
                              towards the center of the ball.

                              Cheers,
                              Gerhard

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                            • jrgen_schrader
                              The trick is to have a panohead that can be stuck into the earth. As you can see from the nadir the footprint of my construction is also extremely small.
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jan 23, 2013
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                                The "trick" is to have a "panohead" that can be stuck into the earth.
                                As you can see from the nadir the footprint of my construction is also extremely small.

                                The principle is similar to other solutions. In this case a ring mount for camera and lens and an individual construction to mount it to the ground. Here I used a simple metal cylinder with a thread on top. Hard ground would need a different approach though.

                                Only limit is the height of the camerabody and/or lens to allow free rotation.

                                Cheers
                                Jürgen

                                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Gerhard Killesreiter wrote:
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                                > Am 23.01.2013 11:06, schrieb jrgen_schrader:
                                > > You didn't specify how "deep" you want to get and what the ground
                                > > is made of. Given the right circumstances something like this can
                                > > easily be achieved
                                > > http://s3.bavaria360.de.s3.amazonaws.com/mushroom/pilz.html
                                >
                                > Great picture!
                                >
                                > That's about the distance I was thinking of, yes.
                                >
                                > Is there a "making of"?
                                >
                                > I also wish to thank the other contributors.
                                >
                                > The device used for creating the snake pano looks very interesting. It
                                > appears it is custom made, though.
                                >
                                > Regarding the comments a la "if you do not mind a litte photoshop
                                > work". I do mind, I don't have talent or patience for this. :(
                                >
                                > So I would prefer a method where I can feed the images into Hugin and
                                > then get a pano out.
                                >
                                > I was also thinking about methods that involve a mirror ball, but the
                                > balls that are available are mostly not of good optical quality and
                                > also, the camera would be in all the images unless I don't fotograph
                                > towards the center of the ball.
                                >
                                > Cheers,
                                > Gerhard
                                >
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                              • Gerhard Killesreiter
                                ... Hash: SHA1 ... What was the orientation of the axis of rotation in this case? I assume vertical? Cheers, Gerhard ... Version: GnuPG v1.4.11 (GNU/Linux)
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jan 23, 2013
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                                  Am 23.01.2013 12:44, schrieb jrgen_schrader:
                                  > The "trick" is to have a "panohead" that can be stuck into the
                                  > earth. As you can see from the nadir the footprint of my
                                  > construction is also extremely small.
                                  >
                                  > The principle is similar to other solutions. In this case a ring
                                  > mount for camera and lens and an individual construction to mount
                                  > it to the ground. Here I used a simple metal cylinder with a thread
                                  > on top. Hard ground would need a different approach though.
                                  >
                                  > Only limit is the height of the camerabody and/or lens to allow
                                  > free rotation.

                                  What was the orientation of the axis of rotation in this case? I
                                  assume vertical?



                                  Cheers,
                                  Gerhard

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                                • Rick Drew
                                  I actually made such a “mount” years ago. Used it for one of the WWP entries
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Jan 23, 2013
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                                    I actually made such a “mount” years ago. Used it for one of the WWP entries (http://www.worldwidepanorama.org/worldwidepanorama/wwp606/html/RichardCDrew-2192.html ).  Just take a 12” length of 3/8 24 threaded rod. Thread a nut down 3/4”, drop on a fender washer, then lock in place with epoxy. Slip on a rubber washer. Sharpen the opposite end on a bench grinder. Now you have a monopod “spike” – press into the ground, attach your pano head and shoot.

                                  • jrgen_schrader
                                    Exactly. Just like a standard tripod setup. Only difference is that the tripod mount is close to ground level and the tripod (in this case the metal tube)
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Jan 23, 2013
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                                      Exactly.
                                      Just like a standard tripod setup.
                                      Only difference is that the tripod mount is close to ground level and the "tripod" (in this case the metal tube) below surface level.

                                      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Gerhard Killesreiter wrote:
                                      >
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                                      > Am 23.01.2013 12:44, schrieb jrgen_schrader:
                                      > > The "trick" is to have a "panohead" that can be stuck into the
                                      > > earth. As you can see from the nadir the footprint of my
                                      > > construction is also extremely small.
                                      > >
                                      > > The principle is similar to other solutions. In this case a ring
                                      > > mount for camera and lens and an individual construction to mount
                                      > > it to the ground. Here I used a simple metal cylinder with a thread
                                      > > on top. Hard ground would need a different approach though.
                                      > >
                                      > > Only limit is the height of the camerabody and/or lens to allow
                                      > > free rotation.
                                      >
                                      > What was the orientation of the axis of rotation in this case? I
                                      > assume vertical?
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Cheers,
                                      > Gerhard
                                      >
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