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Re: Further development of stitchless technique

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  • Mike Sinclair
    On a slightly different topic but one involving the generation of 3D (stereo) panoramas, I have produced many by rotating a single HD video camera well off the
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 8, 2012
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      On a slightly different topic but one involving the generation of 3D (stereo) panoramas, I have produced many by rotating a single HD video camera well off the NPP  through 360 degrees. Recent experiments involve rotating a portrait oriented DSLR with a wide angle rectilinear lens well in front of the NPP while videoing in HD. A simple program processes the video by extracting two 1920 pixel lines (vertical) equidistant to the left and right of the optic axis. These L & R vertical image lines represent two instantaneous, horizontally disparate but parallel image planes. The separation distance ("pupil distance" for sereo) and verge angle are variabe. They are then merged together to form two V x 360 degree pans to be viewed in 3D. This is also a stitchless technique. Because it is a continuous process, the panoramas don't usually suffer from image boundary problems.

       

      A few colleagues have written later about this http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=68819 called "Concentric Mosaics".

       

      I have also had good luck making a normal 2D pan using a fisheye lens rotating on the NPP, extracting the 1920 pixel line on the optic axis (using the "sweet spot" of the lens). The down side is the resulting pan is only 1920 pixels tall and you're stuck with whatever auto/fixed exposure you camera gives you. The up side is you have less problems w parallax, image boundary stitching and object movement. That last one is a two sided coin as objects that move are rendered smoothly but can be distorted. Also, leaving auto-exposure enabled gives you (some) ability to smoothly exposure compensate (over many stops) as you're rotating, much like the RoundShot pan cameras allow.

       

      Cheers,

       

      Mike

    • dorindxn
      Hi Mike, thanks for posting, interesting informations, yes, videoing and rotating around NPP offset opens some ways, but only for static scenes as those two
      Message 2 of 11 , Sep 8, 2012
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        Hi Mike, thanks for posting, interesting informations, yes, videoing and rotating around NPP offset opens some ways, but only for static scenes as those two lines have a time gap, though can be situations when moving features can excape from scanning and so toremain with frozen backround, then, as you kindly noticed, there ise the other side, the unwanded one, when scans catch parts of moving objects.

        For action scene and journalistic VR, I have an already veriffied method, with thousands of pano made, but using fish eye lens, like in this event.
        http://www.livepanoramas.com/event/2012-uefa-europa-league-final-hd-2/?pano=001a_y=16.96_p=25.83_f=65.00

        thanks again for the interes, really appreciate your reply.
        Dorin

        --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Mike Sinclair <sinclair@...> wrote:
        >
        > On a slightly different topic but one involving the generation of 3D (stereo) panoramas, I have produced many by rotating a single HD video camera well off the NPP through 360 degrees. Recent experiments involve rotating a portrait oriented DSLR with a wide angle rectilinear lens well in front of the NPP while videoing in HD. A simple program processes the video by extracting two 1920 pixel lines (vertical) equidistant to the left and right of the optic axis. These L & R vertical image lines represent two instantaneous, horizontally disparate but parallel image planes. The separation distance ("pupil distance" for sereo) and verge angle are variabe. They are then merged together to form two V x 360 degree pans to be viewed in 3D. This is also a stitchless technique. Because it is a continuous process, the panoramas don't usually suffer from image boundary problems.
        >
        > A few colleagues have written later about this http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=68819 called "Concentric Mosaics".
        >
        > I have also had good luck making a normal 2D pan using a fisheye lens rotating on the NPP, extracting the 1920 pixel line on the optic axis (using the "sweet spot" of the lens). The down side is the resulting pan is only 1920 pixels tall and you're stuck with whatever auto/fixed exposure you camera gives you. The up side is you have less problems w parallax, image boundary stitching and object movement. That last one is a two sided coin as objects that move are rendered smoothly but can be distorted. Also, leaving auto-exposure enabled gives you (some) ability to smoothly exposure compensate (over many stops) as you're rotating, much like the RoundShot pan cameras allow.
        >
        > Cheers,
        >
        > Mike
        >
      • panovrx
        about stereo panoramas -- there is a thread on the recent suit by Humaneyes against Sony for single camera sweep stereo capture technologies here
        Message 3 of 11 , Sep 8, 2012
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          about stereo panoramas -- there is a thread on the recent suit by Humaneyes against Sony for single camera sweep stereo capture technologies here
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/photo-3d/message/89311

          about Concentric Panoramas -- this has always interested me -- the idea is you can sweep a video camera in a circle looking in a direction tangent to the circumference -- doing multiple records at different radii. From this set of data you can freely view (in stereo or mono) from virtual viewpoints in a horizontal annular zone around the centre of rotation. An important first step at generalising the qtvr concept.
          For a while there was a realtime viewer and sample scene you could try. Vertical coverage was not very good when I tried it -- maybe 7 or 8 years ago --
          Microsoft have been regularly patenting related concepts ---
          https://www.google.com/?tbm=pts#q=concentric+panoramas+microsoft&hl=en&safe=images&tbas=0&tbm=pts&source=lnt&tbs=sbd:1&sa=X&ei=9I8-ULnAD8zPmAXPl4CAAg&ved=0CCkQpwUoATgU&fp=1&biw=1920&bih=1083&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&cad=b

          Sony Streetview type patenting is getting very hectic lately btw eg.
          https://www.google.com/?tbm=pts#hl=en&safe=images&tbs=sbd:1&tbm=pts&sclient=psy-ab&q=panorama+sony&oq=panorama+sony&gs_l=serp.3..0j0i30l3.133593.137265.8.137789.23.18.5.0.0.0.300.3960.2-17j1.18.0...0.0...1c.dgbM87Yiwpg&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=3613f7d88d311b7e&biw=1920&bih=1083

          PeterM



          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "dorindxn" <Dorin@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Mike, thanks for posting, interesting informations, yes, videoing and rotating around NPP offset opens some ways, but only for static scenes as those two lines have a time gap, though can be situations when moving features can excape from scanning and so toremain with frozen backround, then, as you kindly noticed, there ise the other side, the unwanded one, when scans catch parts of moving objects.
          >
          > For action scene and journalistic VR, I have an already veriffied method, with thousands of pano made, but using fish eye lens, like in this event.
          > http://www.livepanoramas.com/event/2012-uefa-europa-league-final-hd-2/?pano=001a_y=16.96_p=25.83_f=65.00
          >
          > thanks again for the interes, really appreciate your reply.
          > Dorin
          >
          > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Mike Sinclair <sinclair@> wrote:
          > >
          > > On a slightly different topic but one involving the generation of 3D (stereo) panoramas, I have produced many by rotating a single HD video camera well off the NPP through 360 degrees. Recent experiments involve rotating a portrait oriented DSLR with a wide angle rectilinear lens well in front of the NPP while videoing in HD. A simple program processes the video by extracting two 1920 pixel lines (vertical) equidistant to the left and right of the optic axis. These L & R vertical image lines represent two instantaneous, horizontally disparate but parallel image planes. The separation distance ("pupil distance" for sereo) and verge angle are variabe. They are then merged together to form two V x 360 degree pans to be viewed in 3D. This is also a stitchless technique. Because it is a continuous process, the panoramas don't usually suffer from image boundary problems.
          > >
          > > A few colleagues have written later about this http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=68819 called "Concentric Mosaics".
          > >
          > > I have also had good luck making a normal 2D pan using a fisheye lens rotating on the NPP, extracting the 1920 pixel line on the optic axis (using the "sweet spot" of the lens). The down side is the resulting pan is only 1920 pixels tall and you're stuck with whatever auto/fixed exposure you camera gives you. The up side is you have less problems w parallax, image boundary stitching and object movement. That last one is a two sided coin as objects that move are rendered smoothly but can be distorted. Also, leaving auto-exposure enabled gives you (some) ability to smoothly exposure compensate (over many stops) as you're rotating, much like the RoundShot pan cameras allow.
          > >
          > > Cheers,
          > >
          > > Mike
          > >
          >
        • dorindxn
          Hi Peter, sorry that I didn t specified that my 3D panos from around 2009 until present were with using of two cameras, for a 3D pano with a single camera I
          Message 4 of 11 , Sep 8, 2012
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            Hi Peter, sorry that I didn't specified that my 3D panos from around 2009 until present were with using of two cameras, for a 3D pano with a single camera I still use my method posted in several forums like here
            http://www.3dphoto.net/forum/index.php/topic,1238.0.html

            Thank you for the inters in this.

            cheers,
            Dorin

            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "panovrx" <mediavr@...> wrote:
            >
            > about stereo panoramas -- there is a thread on the recent suit by Humaneyes against Sony for single camera sweep stereo capture technologies here
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/photo-3d/message/89311
            >
            > about Concentric Panoramas -- this has always interested me -- the idea is you can sweep a video camera in a circle looking in a direction tangent to the circumference -- doing multiple records at different radii. From this set of data you can freely view (in stereo or mono) from virtual viewpoints in a horizontal annular zone around the centre of rotation. An important first step at generalising the qtvr concept.
            > For a while there was a realtime viewer and sample scene you could try. Vertical coverage was not very good when I tried it -- maybe 7 or 8 years ago --
            > Microsoft have been regularly patenting related concepts ---
            > https://www.google.com/?tbm=pts#q=concentric+panoramas+microsoft&hl=en&safe=images&tbas=0&tbm=pts&source=lnt&tbs=sbd:1&sa=X&ei=9I8-ULnAD8zPmAXPl4CAAg&ved=0CCkQpwUoATgU&fp=1&biw=1920&bih=1083&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&cad=b
            >
            > Sony Streetview type patenting is getting very hectic lately btw eg.
            > https://www.google.com/?tbm=pts#hl=en&safe=images&tbs=sbd:1&tbm=pts&sclient=psy-ab&q=panorama+sony&oq=panorama+sony&gs_l=serp.3..0j0i30l3.133593.137265.8.137789.23.18.5.0.0.0.300.3960.2-17j1.18.0...0.0...1c.dgbM87Yiwpg&pbx=1&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&fp=3613f7d88d311b7e&biw=1920&bih=1083
            >
            > PeterM
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "dorindxn" <Dorin@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi Mike, thanks for posting, interesting informations, yes, videoing and rotating around NPP offset opens some ways, but only for static scenes as those two lines have a time gap, though can be situations when moving features can excape from scanning and so toremain with frozen backround, then, as you kindly noticed, there ise the other side, the unwanded one, when scans catch parts of moving objects.
            > >
            > > For action scene and journalistic VR, I have an already veriffied method, with thousands of pano made, but using fish eye lens, like in this event.
            > > http://www.livepanoramas.com/event/2012-uefa-europa-league-final-hd-2/?pano=001a_y=16.96_p=25.83_f=65.00
            > >
            > > thanks again for the interes, really appreciate your reply.
            > > Dorin
            > >
            > > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Mike Sinclair <sinclair@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > On a slightly different topic but one involving the generation of 3D (stereo) panoramas, I have produced many by rotating a single HD video camera well off the NPP through 360 degrees. Recent experiments involve rotating a portrait oriented DSLR with a wide angle rectilinear lens well in front of the NPP while videoing in HD. A simple program processes the video by extracting two 1920 pixel lines (vertical) equidistant to the left and right of the optic axis. These L & R vertical image lines represent two instantaneous, horizontally disparate but parallel image planes. The separation distance ("pupil distance" for sereo) and verge angle are variabe. They are then merged together to form two V x 360 degree pans to be viewed in 3D. This is also a stitchless technique. Because it is a continuous process, the panoramas don't usually suffer from image boundary problems.
            > > >
            > > > A few colleagues have written later about this http://research.microsoft.com/apps/pubs/default.aspx?id=68819 called "Concentric Mosaics".
            > > >
            > > > I have also had good luck making a normal 2D pan using a fisheye lens rotating on the NPP, extracting the 1920 pixel line on the optic axis (using the "sweet spot" of the lens). The down side is the resulting pan is only 1920 pixels tall and you're stuck with whatever auto/fixed exposure you camera gives you. The up side is you have less problems w parallax, image boundary stitching and object movement. That last one is a two sided coin as objects that move are rendered smoothly but can be distorted. Also, leaving auto-exposure enabled gives you (some) ability to smoothly exposure compensate (over many stops) as you're rotating, much like the RoundShot pan cameras allow.
            > > >
            > > > Cheers,
            > > >
            > > > Mike
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • dorindxn
            Another one from today. Made from 2x93 photos taken with two cameras with 18-55mm @55mm, red-cyan anaglyph (red over the left eye). Is a large download (44mb)
            Message 5 of 11 , Sep 9, 2012
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              Another one from today.
              Made from 2x93 photos taken with two cameras with 18-55mm @55mm,
              red-cyan anaglyph (red over the left eye).
              Is a large download (44mb) !

              http://www.livepanoramas.com/dorin/61c/Unirii3D-2/61c.html

              thanks for the visit,
              Dorin
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