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Re: [PanoToolsNG] 360 Stitching for 3D Animation: Stitched Panorama Seems Are Looking "Jittery"?

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  • Matthew Rogers
    Would be easier to just buy Cinema 4D and output the final 360º image/animation in one go therefore bypassing the need for the stitching step. Matt ... Would
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 2, 2012
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      Would be easier to just buy Cinema 4D and output the final 360º image/animation in one go therefore bypassing the need for the stitching step.

      Matt

      On 2 Aug 2012, at 18:27, ultrun <owntheweb@...> wrote:

       

      Howdy panorama gurus,

      I'm having great success stitching 180 circular fisheye images with Hugin (in sets of 3, at 120 degree rotations) generated in Blender, a 3D design and rendering program. I even got as far as automating the process of stitching an entire animation by creating a shell script to run on iOS (see below). The resulting 360 images will be projected on Science on a Sphere (SOS), a six foot diameter sphere that hangs from the ceiling. Here's what I have so far projected on a virtual sphere:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWGVWMZ_Mko 

      Fun stuff!

      The Challenge:
      If you look to the left side of the sphere, you can see a "jittery" effect going on at a stitched panorama seem/border. The stars there jump up and down as it animates. I'm hoping to stitch every panorama set the exact same way, avoiding what I think may be some kind of optimization or dynamic blending that's going on, differing from frame to frame.

      ===============================
      Any thoughts on how to proceed?
      ===============================

      Here's my current process. I'm open to any suggestions you may have! Maybe this will help another spherical animator out there...

      1. I generated a set of three 180 degree fisheye images, rotated at exactly 0, 120, and 240 degrees (with an odd rotation in Blender, it may actually be -120, -240 in Hugin in this example). 3D rendering greatly helps with the accuracy and consistency of an animation I think. Images can be previewed at:
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/8139783@N08/7698863358 

      2. I opened up Hugin and generated a first "template" panorama, following various instruction sources found online. Here's a snapshot of my tabs:

      Assistant: (skipped/no values set)

      Images:
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/8139783@N08/7698927106/in/photostream 

      Camera and Lens:
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/8139783@N08/7698927192/in/photostream 

      Crop: (skipped/no values set)

      Mask: (skipped/no values set)

      Control Points: (would this cause some issues? - I made about 10 control points for all matching sides, including the last to the first image)
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/8139783@N08/7698927394/in/photostream 

      Optimizer: (skipped/no values set)

      Exposure: (didn't change anything)
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/8139783@N08/7698927008/in/photostream 

      Stitcher:
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/8139783@N08/7698927536/in/photostream 

      A resulting panorama (cool!):
      http://www.flickr.com/photos/8139783@N08/7698928838/in/photostream 

      3. I created a script by copying and pasting bits I saw while things were stitching and customized to batch process hundreds of panorama sets:

      #!/bin/bash
      #sometimes random sets fail with an interesting 'Abort: Trap 6' error, but easily fixed by re-running this script on individual sets
      cd /Users/owntheweb/Documents/personal/sos/output/
      TOTAL=590
      THECOUNT=0
      while [[ $THECOUNT -lt $TOTAL ]]; do
      (( THECOUNT++ ))
      echo $THECOUNT
      CURNUM=$(printf "%.6d" "$THECOUNT")
      FILE1=dome2/domemaster/dome$CURNUM.png
      FILE2=dome1/domemaster/dome$CURNUM.png
      FILE3=dome3/domemaster/dome$CURNUM.png
      /Applications/Hugin/PTBatcherGUI.app/Contents/MacOS/nona -o out -m TIFF_m domemaster/360_2048x1024_B.pto $FILE1 $FILE2 $FILE3
      /Applications/Hugin/PTBatcherGUI.app/Contents/MacOS/enblend -w -f2048x1024 -o results/pano$CURNUM.png -- out0000.tif out0001.tif out0002.tif
      rm out0000.tif
      rm out0001.tif
      rm out0002.tif
      done


      4.
      Then I render the animation frames to a virtual sphere:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWGVWMZ_Mko 

      That's that. I apologize if this was a long rant. Any thoughts on how I can remove the animation jitter and/or improve my process? Thanks for the assist in advance!

      Best regards,

      Chris



    • ultrun
      Would be easier to just buy Cinema 4D and output the final 360 image/animation in one go therefore bypassing the need for the stitching step. Perhaps it
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 2, 2012
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        "Would be easier to just buy Cinema 4D and output the final 360 image/animation in one go therefore bypassing the need for the stitching step."

        Perhaps it would be easier... but I work for a non-profit with no budget for that. ;)
      • Matthew Rogers
        You can always find a free copy on the front of old magazines or on eBay for next to nothing. Matt
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 2, 2012
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          You can always find a free copy on the front of old magazines or on eBay for next to nothing.

          Matt

          On 2 Aug 2012, at 19:32, ultrun <owntheweb@...> wrote:

           

          "Would be easier to just buy Cinema 4D and output the final 360 image/animation in one go therefore bypassing the need for the stitching step."

          Perhaps it would be easier... but I work for a non-profit with no budget for that. ;)


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