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360 gigapixel images

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  • Peter
    Hi, Im planning on producing a 360 spherical gigapixel image. Is there a way of working out how many images are required for any camera body and lens
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 2, 2012
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      Hi,

      Im planning on producing a 360 spherical gigapixel image. Is there a way of working out how many images are required for any camera body and lens configuration and what resolution it will produce?

      Pete


      Peter Stephens Photography
      www.peterstephens.co.uk
    • Erik Krause
      ... Yes, of course. You can use one of the panoramic calculators, f.e. http://www.frankvanderpol.nl/fov_pan_calc.htm or you load a sample image in PTGui and
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 2, 2012
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        Am 02.07.2012 22:07, schrieb Peter:
        > Im planning on producing a 360 spherical gigapixel image. Is there a
        > way of working out how many images are required for any camera body
        > and lens configuration and what resolution it will produce?

        Yes, of course. You can use one of the panoramic calculators, f.e.
        http://www.frankvanderpol.nl/fov_pan_calc.htm
        or you load a sample image in PTGui and let it calculate the field of
        view from EXIF data. Given you shoot in portrait you simply multiply the
        field of view with 0.75 (for 25% overlap) and divide 360 by the result
        for the number of shots per row. You get the number of rows if you do
        the same with a landscape image and use 180 instead of 360.

        If you have the image loaded in PTGui and you set output projection to
        360x180 equirectangular you can get the maximum resolution if you press
        "set optimum Size"->"Maximum size" on create panorama tab.

        --
        Erik Krause
        http://www.erik-krause.de
      • Peter Stephens - PanoTools NG list
        Thank you Erik ! Peter Stephens Photography www.peterstephens.co.uk
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 3, 2012
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          Thank you Erik !

          Peter Stephens Photography
          www.peterstephens.co.uk


          On 2 Jul 2012, at 21:42, Erik Krause <erik.krause@...> wrote:

          > Am 02.07.2012 22:07, schrieb Peter:
          >> Im planning on producing a 360 spherical gigapixel image. Is there a
          >> way of working out how many images are required for any camera body
          >> and lens configuration and what resolution it will produce?
          >
          > Yes, of course. You can use one of the panoramic calculators, f.e.
          > http://www.frankvanderpol.nl/fov_pan_calc.htm
          > or you load a sample image in PTGui and let it calculate the field of
          > view from EXIF data. Given you shoot in portrait you simply multiply the
          > field of view with 0.75 (for 25% overlap) and divide 360 by the result
          > for the number of shots per row. You get the number of rows if you do
          > the same with a landscape image and use 180 instead of 360.
          >
          > If you have the image loaded in PTGui and you set output projection to
          > 360x180 equirectangular you can get the maximum resolution if you press
          > "set optimum Size"->"Maximum size" on create panorama tab.
          >
          > --
          > Erik Krause
          > http://www.erik-krause.de
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > --
          >
          >
          >
        • will hall
          theres a python script in the autopano forums ( http://www.kolor.com/forum/t8100-papyspheric-a-python-program-to-build-templates-for-panospheres) where you can
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 3, 2012
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            theres a python script in the autopano forums (http://www.kolor.com/forum/t8100-papyspheric-a-python-program-to-build-templates-for-panospheres) where you can input the lens and sensor details and it'll output a papywizard xml file to shoot an optimised sphere which you can use to determine the number of images and the shooting configuration
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