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Re: the smc PENTAX DA 35mm F2.8 Macro Limited lens

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  • Erik Krause
    ... It is true you need overlap which effectively makes the used part of any image smaller, but it is not true that wide angle images will be cropped. If your
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 4, 2012
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      Am 04.03.2012 03:26, schrieb Peter:
      > Contrary to what one would assume when talking about lens choices for
      > shooting panoramic images, wide-angle lenses are not necessarily the
      > best choice when it comes to stitching individual images together.
      > The reason is that in the process of maintaining proper perspective
      > and blending overlapping sections of adjacent images, the corners of
      > each frame have to be cropped slightly,

      It is true you need overlap which effectively makes the used part of any
      image smaller, but it is not true that wide angle images will be
      cropped. If your overlap is 25% you lose this amount of pixels for
      overlap no matter how long your lens is.

      Perspective distortion isn't an issue. Panorama stitchers remap the
      images such that you can use the complete image. It could be they talk
      about using rectilinear images for cylindrical projection output. In
      this case any image gets bulged on the upper and lower edge, which
      doesn't allow the use of the full height. That's the reason why it's
      better to shoot in portrait orientation, where the bulging is less due
      to the shorter side.

      > So, while in theory you need fewer wider-angle pictures to create a
      > panoramic photograph, if you shoot with a lens closer to whatever is
      > considered "normal" based on the camera format you're using (i.e.
      > 50mm for a full-frame 35, and 35mm for an APS-C-format camera),
      > you'll end up with a sharper, better-detailed panoramic photograph.

      You get higher resolution with a longer lens, that's true. The reason
      they give is somehow misleading. It's far easier: with longer lenses you
      get more pixels per degree, roughly the double amount if the focal
      length doubles. The mention of the "normal" focal length is nonsense.

      The question is the use you intend for your panoramas. If you are in
      large scale prints you better use a longer lens and many shots in order
      to get enough resolution. If you shoot for web presentation a wide angle
      or a fisheye lens will do. If you shoot distant landscape scenes you can
      easily deal with lots of images but if you shoot crowded places or
      landscape with nearby plants you will have a lot of trouble due to
      people or leaves moving between adjacent shots.

      --
      Erik Krause
      http://www.erik-krause.de
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