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Re: OT - creating spatial models from 3 panoramas

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  • Erik Krause
    ... Nice you brought this up again. The current german magazine ct has an article about computer usage in archeology, where they mention the use of
    Message 1 of 26 , Feb 24 12:06 PM
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      Am 24.02.2012 19:10, schrieb web@...:
      > For some reason I could not log into the forum for several months
      > last winter, so I missed this post;

      Nice you brought this up again. The current german magazine ct has an
      article about computer usage in archeology, where they mention the use
      of photogrammetry software: http://www.heise.de/ct/inhalt/2012/05/80/

      Especially the open source combo Bundler/PMVS2 was reported to give very
      good results: http://grail.cs.washington.edu/software/pmvs/

      --
      Erik Krause
      http://www.erik-krause.de
    • erik_leeman
      A perhaps little bit easier to use Structure From Motion package that s free for personal, non-profit or research, named VisualSFM by Changchang Wu can be
      Message 2 of 26 , Feb 24 1:02 PM
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        A perhaps little bit easier to use 'Structure From Motion' package that's free for personal, non-profit or research, named 'VisualSFM' by Changchang Wu can be found here:
        <http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/ccwu/vsfm/>

        An introductory video by Eugene Liscio:
        <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ax6gajFE-qw>
        A written tutorial by Eugene Liscio:
        <http://www.iafsm.org/resources/Opensourcetoolspart3.pdf>

        There's also the free SFMToolkit3 by Henri Astre
        <http://www.visual-experiments.com/demos/sfmtoolkit/>

        I have to say that in direct comparison tests I did with these packages, they performed not nearly as good as AgiSoft's (commercial) PhotoScan, but other, more knowledgeable users may have come to different results. I haven't yet tried other commercial SFM tools like PhotoModeler Scanner, partly because of the impressive results I got with Agisoft.

        As an added bonus AgiSoft PhotoScan is MUCH easier to use too, but, like PhotoModeler Scanner, the Professional version is (far too) expensive for non-profit applications. However they also offer a 'light' version for $179,- that I can wholeheartedly recommend to those who don't really need the functionality of the full version.
        The Agisoft products can be found here:
        <http://www.agisoft.ru/products>

        Screenshots of some of my experiments with these programs can be found in my Flickr stream:
        <http://www.flickr.com/photos/erik-nl/>

        Cheers!

        Erik Leeman
        <http://www.erikleeman.com>

        --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Erik Krause wrote:
        > Nice you brought this up again. The current german magazine ct has an
        > article about computer usage in archeology, where they mention the
        > use of photogrammetry software: http://www.heise.de/ct/inhalt/2012/05
        > /80/
        >
        > Especially the open source combo Bundler/PMVS2 was reported to give
        > very good results: http://grail.cs.washington.edu/software/pmvs/
        >
        > --
        > Erik Krause
        > http://www.erik-krause.de
      • web@drmattnolan.org
        Thanks for the tip on Agisoft Photoscan. I tried the demo with a few blocks of air photos and it performed great, even easier to use than Photomodeler (which
        Message 3 of 26 , Feb 25 11:21 AM
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          Thanks for the tip on Agisoft Photoscan. I tried the demo with a few blocks of air photos and it performed great, even easier to use than Photomodeler (which is pretty darn easy) and preliminary visual checks gave great results. They offer a huge academic discount, and the exported results were on par with the other packages I've tried. It will take more work to determine which is more accurate, but what I really like about Agisoft is that it does a field lens calibration with every dataset, which is important I think for low-end photogrammetry setups like mine (just regular DSLRs) which dont have the internal stability of high-end photogrammetric cameras, plus it claims to correct non-radial distortions. The automation seems to come at the price of flexibility and some abilities to aid solutions that fail automation, but for well behaved input data I think this a great tool to have. Plus it maxes out all CPU/RAM that you allow it to, and works really fast. It's conceivable I could get off the plane with a nearly-finished product, which is great for all kinds of reasons.
          Thanks!
          Matt

          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "erik_leeman" <erik.leeman@...> wrote:
          >
          > A perhaps little bit easier to use 'Structure From Motion' package that's free for personal, non-profit or research, named 'VisualSFM' by Changchang Wu can be found here:
          > <http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/ccwu/vsfm/>
          >
          > An introductory video by Eugene Liscio:
          > <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ax6gajFE-qw>
          > A written tutorial by Eugene Liscio:
          > <http://www.iafsm.org/resources/Opensourcetoolspart3.pdf>
          >
          > There's also the free SFMToolkit3 by Henri Astre
          > <http://www.visual-experiments.com/demos/sfmtoolkit/>
          >
          > I have to say that in direct comparison tests I did with these packages, they performed not nearly as good as AgiSoft's (commercial) PhotoScan, but other, more knowledgeable users may have come to different results. I haven't yet tried other commercial SFM tools like PhotoModeler Scanner, partly because of the impressive results I got with Agisoft.
          >
          > As an added bonus AgiSoft PhotoScan is MUCH easier to use too, but, like PhotoModeler Scanner, the Professional version is (far too) expensive for non-profit applications. However they also offer a 'light' version for $179,- that I can wholeheartedly recommend to those who don't really need the functionality of the full version.
          > The Agisoft products can be found here:
          > <http://www.agisoft.ru/products>
          >
          > Screenshots of some of my experiments with these programs can be found in my Flickr stream:
          > <http://www.flickr.com/photos/erik-nl/>
          >
          > Cheers!
          >
          > Erik Leeman
          > <http://www.erikleeman.com>
          >
          > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Erik Krause wrote:
          > > Nice you brought this up again. The current german magazine ct has an
          > > article about computer usage in archeology, where they mention the
          > > use of photogrammetry software: http://www.heise.de/ct/inhalt/2012/05
          > > /80/
          > >
          > > Especially the open source combo Bundler/PMVS2 was reported to give
          > > very good results: http://grail.cs.washington.edu/software/pmvs/
          > >
          > > --
          > > Erik Krause
          > > http://www.erik-krause.de
          >
        • erik_leeman
          My pleasure, glad you like it : ) I think in time for interactive purposes this technology is likely to replace spherical panoramas as we know them today. It
          Message 4 of 26 , Feb 25 11:50 AM
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            My pleasure, glad you like it : )

            I think in time for interactive purposes this technology is likely to replace spherical panoramas as we know them today.
            It leans VERY hard on reasonably contemporary hardware though, 24GB of RAM and a pretty capable CPU+GPU hardly cut it if you want to capture a lot of detail. For extended scenes we're back to processing times of 10 hours and more, like we were used to with PTGui not so long ago.
            But no doubt that will change quickly enough.

            Cheers!

            Erik Leeman

            <http://www.flickr.com/photos/erik-nl/> <http://www.erikleeman.com>

            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, wrote:
            >
            > Thanks for the tip on Agisoft Photoscan.
            ...snip...
            > Matt
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