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  • Roger D. Williams
    I used to know how to use Photoshop layers created by PTgui, painting through the blended image to the layers underneath so as to tidy up stuff split by seams.
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 10, 2012
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      I used to know how to use Photoshop layers created by PTgui, painting
      through the blended image to the layers underneath so as to tidy up
      stuff split by seams. Ever since Joost introduced the "mask" function
      I've managed to avoid this, but today I came across something that
      can only be solved using this paint-through technique, but I've
      forgotten how to do it! I have the layers, but there's some way of
      clicking on thumbnails in Photoshop's layer view that shows where the
      layer boundaries come (marching ants). Nothing I've tried works. I'm
      pretty sure I remember how to select Black and White brushes to
      reveal and hide the layer(s) underneath. But I can't get that far!

      I did look at the Panotools Wiki, and John Houghton's list of
      excellent tutorials, but I guess this is so simple and basic as not
      to need explanation. Except by me. <sigh>

      I do hope this is not the start of Alzheimer's. Would someone please
      help? You will not insult me by baby-talking me through the steps in
      PhotoShop. <wry grin>

      roger@...

      --
      Business: www.adex-japan.com
      Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
      Panorama: Rogerama at Photosynth
    • panokaemena@mac.com
      Roger, don t worry, you are not alone…. I never worked with Photoshop masks… but I did more than 3000 Panoramas without it ! When required I use the
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 11, 2012
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        Roger, don't worry, you are not alone…. I never worked with Photoshop masks… but I did more than 3000 Panoramas without it ! When required I use the information of the PTgui layers, which is a much more straight forward and clear process. Never liked this mystical masks.

        Willy

        On 11.01.2012, at 15:41, Roger D. Williams wrote:

        > I used to know how to use Photoshop layers created by PTgui, painting
        > through the blended image to the layers underneath so as to tidy up
        > stuff split by seams. Ever since Joost introduced the "mask" function
        > I've managed to avoid this, but today I came across something that
        > can only be solved using this paint-through technique, but I've
        > forgotten how to do it! I have the layers, but there's some way of
        > clicking on thumbnails in Photoshop's layer view that shows where the
        > layer boundaries come (marching ants). Nothing I've tried works. I'm
        > pretty sure I remember how to select Black and White brushes to
        > reveal and hide the layer(s) underneath. But I can't get that far!
        >
        > I did look at the Panotools Wiki, and John Houghton's list of
        > excellent tutorials, but I guess this is so simple and basic as not
        > to need explanation. Except by me. <sigh>
        >
        > I do hope this is not the start of Alzheimer's. Would someone please
        > help? You will not insult me by baby-talking me through the steps in
        > PhotoShop. <wry grin>
        >
        > roger@...
        >
        > --
        > Business: www.adex-japan.com
        > Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
        > Panorama: Rogerama at Photosynth
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > --
        >
        >
        >
      • Pat Swovelin
        ... To quickly find the layer pair you need to be working on Ctrl-click a layer s image icon to select it. You can quickly move from layer to layer to find
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 11, 2012
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          On 1/10/2012 11:41 PM, Roger D. Williams wrote:
          I used to know how to use Photoshop layers created by PTgui, painting
          through the blended image to the layers underneath so as to tidy up
          stuff split by seams. Ever since Joost introduced the "mask" function
          I've managed to avoid this, but today I came across something that
          can only be solved using this paint-through technique, but I've
          forgotten how to do it! I have the layers, but there's some way of
          clicking on thumbnails in Photoshop's layer view that shows where the
          layer boundaries come (marching ants). Nothing I've tried works. I'm
          pretty sure I remember how to select Black and White brushes to
          reveal and hide the layer(s) underneath. But I can't get that far!

          I did look at the Panotools Wiki, and John Houghton's list of
          excellent tutorials, but I guess this is so simple and basic as not
          to need explanation. Except by me. <sigh>

          I do hope this is not the start of Alzheimer's. Would someone please
          help? You will not insult me by baby-talking me through the steps in
          PhotoShop. <wry grin>

          To quickly find the layer pair you need to be working on Ctrl-click a layer's image icon to select it.  You can quickly move from layer to layer to find the layer pair, the ones on both side of the seam, you need to fix.  Press Ctrl-D to deselect that selection.

          When any layer is selected there is a rectangle around either the layer's image or mask icon.  The icon with the selection rectangle is what you'll be working on on that layer, i.e., image or layer mask.  Click on the layer mask icon to give it the focus and paint on it with a white-filled brush.  If you can't figure out which layer of the pair you need to paint back in you can select the layer mask icon and press Ctrl-backspace to fill it with the background color or Alt-backspace to fill it with the foreground color.  Choosing the one that will fill it with white will instantly show you if that's the layer you need to be painting on.  Press Ctrl-Z to undo that layer mask fill and start painting.  If that's not the layer you want move to the one above/below it (depending on which side of the seam the one you just tried is in) and fill it to see if that's what you need.  Sometimes you'll need to work on both layers of a layer pair.

          The mnemonic is: black conceals and white reveals.  Keep that in mind when you paint on a layer mask.

          Let me know if you have any problems or questions with that.

          roger@...



          Pat Swovelin
          Cool Guy @ Large
        • Bjørn K Nilssen
          ... Another quicker(?) way to see what s on the layer is to temporarily disable the layer mask. This is done by Shift-clicking the mask thumbnail. A red X is
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 11, 2012
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            På Wed, 11 Jan 2012 09:04:37 +0100, skrev Pat Swovelin <panoramas@...>:


            > To quickly find the layer pair you need to be working on Ctrl-click a
            > layer's image icon to select it. You can quickly move from layer to
            > layer to find the layer pair, the ones on both side of the seam, you
            > need to fix. Press Ctrl-D to deselect that selection.
            >
            > When any layer is selected there is a rectangle around either the
            > layer's image or mask icon. The icon with the selection rectangle is
            > what you'll be working on on that layer, i.e., image or layer mask.
            > Click on the layer mask icon to give it the focus and paint on it with a
            > white-filled brush. If you can't figure out which layer of the pair you
            > need to paint back in you can select the layer mask icon and press
            > Ctrl-backspace to fill it with the background color or Alt-backspace to
            > fill it with the foreground color. Choosing the one that will fill it
            > with white will instantly show you if that's the layer you need to be
            > painting on. Press Ctrl-Z to undo that layer mask fill and start
            > painting. If that's not the layer you want move to the one above/below
            > it (depending on which side of the seam the one you just tried is in)
            > and fill it to see if that's what you need. Sometimes you'll need to
            > work on both layers of a layer pair.
            >
            > The mnemonic is: black conceals and white reveals. Keep that in mind
            > when you paint on a layer mask.

            Another quicker(?) way to see what's on the layer is to temporarily disable the layer mask.
            This is done by Shift-clicking the mask thumbnail.
            A red X is shown on top of the mask, and the entire layer is revealed.
            A new Shift-click enables the mask again.

            --
            Bjørn K Nilssen - bk@... - 3D and panoramas
          • Ronald
            To see the marching ants: go to your layers panel, right click on the mask icon of the concerning layer, and click add mask to selection . Ronald
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 11, 2012
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              To see the marching ants: go to your layers panel, right click on the mask icon of the concerning layer, and click 'add mask to selection'.

              Ronald

              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Roger D. Williams" <roger@...> wrote:
              >
              > I used to know how to use Photoshop layers created by PTgui, painting
              > through the blended image to the layers underneath so as to tidy up
              > stuff split by seams. Ever since Joost introduced the "mask" function
              > I've managed to avoid this, but today I came across something that
              > can only be solved using this paint-through technique, but I've
              > forgotten how to do it! I have the layers, but there's some way of
              > clicking on thumbnails in Photoshop's layer view that shows where the
              > layer boundaries come (marching ants). Nothing I've tried works. I'm
              > pretty sure I remember how to select Black and White brushes to
              > reveal and hide the layer(s) underneath. But I can't get that far!
              >
              > I did look at the Panotools Wiki, and John Houghton's list of
              > excellent tutorials, but I guess this is so simple and basic as not
              > to need explanation. Except by me. <sigh>
              >
              > I do hope this is not the start of Alzheimer's. Would someone please
              > help? You will not insult me by baby-talking me through the steps in
              > PhotoShop. <wry grin>
              >
              > roger@...
              >
              > --
              > Business: www.adex-japan.com
              > Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
              > Panorama: Rogerama at Photosynth
              >
            • Roger D Williams
              Thanks, Ronald, Bjorn and Pat. Exactly what I wanted to know--and some nice new info from Pat! Much appreciated... Roger PS There are now seven panos of
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 11, 2012
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                Thanks, Ronald, Bjorn and Pat. Exactly what I wanted to know--and some nice new info from Pat!

                Much appreciated...

                Roger

                PS There are now seven panos of Bangkok at my Rogerama section of Photosynth.net, one of them making use of this information!
              • Eduardo Hutter
                And you can also Alt+click the layer mask s icon to see only the mask and not the image. Its very usefull to see what your mask actually looks like and to
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 11, 2012
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                  And you can also Alt+click the layer mask's icon to see only the mask and not the image. Its very usefull to see what your mask actually looks like and to search for holes, etc

                  2012/1/11 Bjørn K Nilssen <bk@...>

                  Another quicker(?) way to see what's on the layer is to temporarily disable the layer mask.
                  This is done by Shift-clicking the mask thumbnail.
                  A red X is shown on top of the mask, and the entire layer is revealed.
                  A new Shift-click enables the mask again.

                • Roger D. Williams
                  Aha! Duly noted. Thanks. Roger W. On Thu, 12 Jan 2012 06:05:02 +0900, Eduardo Hutter ... -- Business: www.adex-japan.com Pleasure:
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 11, 2012
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                    Aha! Duly noted. Thanks.

                    Roger W.


                    On Thu, 12 Jan 2012 06:05:02 +0900, Eduardo Hutter <montreal360@...>
                    wrote:

                    > And you can also Alt+click the layer mask's icon to see only the mask and
                    > not the image. Its very usefull to see what your mask actually looks like
                    > and to search for holes, etc
                    >
                    > 2012/1/11 Bjørn K Nilssen <bk@...>
                    >
                    >>
                    >> Another quicker(?) way to see what's on the layer is to temporarily
                    >> disable the layer mask.
                    >> This is done by Shift-clicking the mask thumbnail.
                    >> A red X is shown on top of the mask, and the entire layer is revealed.
                    >> A new Shift-click enables the mask again.
                    >>


                    --
                    Business: www.adex-japan.com
                    Pleasure: www.usefilm.com/member/roger
                    Panorama: Rogerama at Photosynth
                  • Bjørn K Nilssen
                    ... When painting on the mask there is another very useful shortcut available by default: X , which toggles between black and white. It is often quicker to
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 12, 2012
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                      På Thu, 12 Jan 2012 04:30:17 +0100, skrev Roger D. Williams <roger@...>:

                      > Aha! Duly noted. Thanks.

                      When painting on the mask there is another very useful shortcut available by default: X , which toggles between black and white.
                      It is often quicker to just use a big brush first with white, then toggle to black and a smaller brush and clean up.

                      > Roger W.
                      >
                      >
                      > On Thu, 12 Jan 2012 06:05:02 +0900, Eduardo Hutter <montreal360@...>
                      > wrote:
                      >
                      >> And you can also Alt+click the layer mask's icon to see only the mask and
                      >> not the image. Its very usefull to see what your mask actually looks like
                      >> and to search for holes, etc
                      >>
                      >> 2012/1/11 Bjørn K Nilssen <bk@...>
                      >>
                      >>>
                      >>> Another quicker(?) way to see what's on the layer is to temporarily
                      >>> disable the layer mask.
                      >>> This is done by Shift-clicking the mask thumbnail.
                      >>> A red X is shown on top of the mask, and the entire layer is revealed.
                      >>> A new Shift-click enables the mask again.
                      >>>
                      >
                      >


                      --
                      Bjørn K Nilssen - bk@... - 3D and panoramas
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