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Your expert advice for converting TIFFs to JPGs?

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  • Peter A. Schaible
    I manipulate my panoramic images as large TIFF files until I m eventually ready to send a final image to a printer, where it needs to be a JPG file and greatly
    Message 1 of 11 , Dec 27, 2011
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      I manipulate my panoramic images as large TIFF files until I'm
      eventually ready to send a final image to a printer, where it needs to
      be a JPG file and greatly reduced in size.

      Please share with me your favorite software/process/workflow for
      converting large TIFFs to JPGs in reasonable sizes that printers like,
      but that don't compromise too much detail.

      BTW, I own Photomatix, PTGui, DxO Optics Pro, and Jasc Paint Shop Pro 8.

      I DO NOT OWN Photoshop (too complicated), and while I DO OWN Lightroom
      (also insanely complicated for someone of my limited mental capacity), I
      hate it with a passion and never use it unless absolutely necessary, and
      then it always inspires weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth.

      Your thoughts? Thanks in advance for your generous response.


      --
      --Peter

      Peter A. Schaible
    • Sacha Griffin
      There isn t much to consider. Printers print as specific sizes and usually at 300 dpi. A 10 inch by 10 inch print effectively utilizes a 3000x3000 image. So
      Message 2 of 11 , Dec 27, 2011
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        There isn’t much to consider.

        Printers print as specific sizes and usually at 300 dpi.

        A 10 inch by 10 inch print effectively utilizes a 3000x3000 image.

        So resize for the printer the exact dimension in pixels that will be required and save at jpg level 10.

         

        Each jpg level from the top begins to induce a pattern of noise and then artifacts.

        Jpg level 10 in photoshop world is a good setting as you’d never notice the decrease in noise from levels 11 and 12 on a print.

        Most online printers even have software that does this step for you. WHCC has a java applet called roes which they license, “so I assume many printers use roes too”, and it does the resizing and converting for you, as well as the uploading.

        If you want to understand jpg, take a tiff and save 12 files each with a different compression level.

         

        Sacha Griffin

        Southern Digital Solutions LLC  - Atlanta, Georgia

        http://www.seeit360.com

        http://twitter.com/SeeIt360

        http://www.facebook.com/SeeIt360

        EMAIL: sachagriffin@...

        IM: sachagriffin007@...

        Office: 404-551-4275

         

         

        From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Peter A. Schaible
        Sent: Tuesday, December 27, 2011 10:45 AM
        To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [PanoToolsNG] Your expert advice for converting TIFFs to JPGs?

         

         

        I manipulate my panoramic images as large TIFF files until I'm
        eventually ready to send a final image to a printer, where it needs to
        be a JPG file and greatly reduced in size.

        Please share with me your favorite software/process/workflow for
        converting large TIFFs to JPGs in reasonable sizes that printers like,
        but that don't compromise too much detail.

        BTW, I own Photomatix, PTGui, DxO Optics Pro, and Jasc Paint Shop Pro 8.

        I DO NOT OWN Photoshop (too complicated), and while I DO OWN Lightroom
        (also insanely complicated for someone of my limited mental capacity), I
        hate it with a passion and never use it unless absolutely necessary, and
        then it always inspires weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth.

        Your thoughts? Thanks in advance for your generous response.

        --
        --Peter

        Peter A. Schaible

      • Erik Krause
        ... What printes do you use? If you don t upload your file I doubt it needs to be jpeg. Jpeg is limited to 30000 pixels each side, so you won t be able to
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 27, 2011
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          Am 27.12.2011 16:44, schrieb Peter A. Schaible:
          > Please share with me your favorite software/process/workflow for
          > converting large TIFFs to JPGs in reasonable sizes that printers like,
          > but that don't compromise too much detail.

          What printes do you use? If you don't upload your file I doubt it needs
          to be jpeg. Jpeg is limited to 30000 pixels each side, so you won't be
          able to print larger panoramas at a good resolution.

          If you print on your own local printer I recommend a dedicated printing
          program which can read a lot of file formats, is color managed and knows
          about the printer native resolution.

          You can use a RIP for that but this is an expensive solution. I use
          QImage to get the best results from my Epson printer. It uses very
          sophisticated resizing algorithms and allows for roll paper printing
          even beyond the maximum printable size by printing several chunks
          without seams and much more... Even if you print online QImage might be
          a god solution, since it optimizes and formats images for online print
          services.

          --
          Erik Krause
        • Erik Krause
          ... Should read: What printer do you use? -- Erik Krause
          Message 4 of 11 , Dec 27, 2011
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            Am 27.12.2011 19:49, schrieb Erik Krause:
            > What printes do you use?

            Should read: What printer do you use?

            --
            Erik Krause
          • Peter
            Erik, with all due respect to you and Sacha, your replies are as clear as mud to me. All I am asking for is the name of a program or procedure (work flow) for
            Message 5 of 11 , Dec 27, 2011
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              Erik, with all due respect to you and Sacha, your replies are as clear as mud to me.

              All I am asking for is the name of a program or procedure (work flow) for changing TIFFs to JPGs. I don't do my own high-end printing. The people who do that for me -- there is more than one -- want JPGs. I finish making a blended and stitched panoramic and I have a very large TIFF file. How should I convert it to JPEG and make it smaller and more manageable?



              --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Erik Krause <erik.krause@...> wrote:
              >
              > Am 27.12.2011 16:44, schrieb Peter A. Schaible:
              > > Please share with me your favorite software/process/workflow for
              > > converting large TIFFs to JPGs in reasonable sizes that printers like,
              > > but that don't compromise too much detail.
              >
              > What printes do you use? If you don't upload your file I doubt it needs
              > to be jpeg. Jpeg is limited to 30000 pixels each side, so you won't be
              > able to print larger panoramas at a good resolution.
              >
              > If you print on your own local printer I recommend a dedicated printing
              > program which can read a lot of file formats, is color managed and knows
              > about the printer native resolution.
              >
              > You can use a RIP for that but this is an expensive solution. I use
              > QImage to get the best results from my Epson printer. It uses very
              > sophisticated resizing algorithms and allows for roll paper printing
              > even beyond the maximum printable size by printing several chunks
              > without seams and much more... Even if you print online QImage might be
              > a god solution, since it optimizes and formats images for online print
              > services.
              >
              > --
              > Erik Krause
              >
            • Sacha Griffin
              Lol! Pretty sure your lightroom will do that. If its not available in your save as dialog, ensure you ve changed its mode to 8 bits, then jpg should show up.
              Message 6 of 11 , Dec 27, 2011
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                Lol! Pretty sure your lightroom will do that. If its not available in your save as dialog, ensure you've changed its mode to 8 bits, then jpg should show up. Or google "how to save jpg lightroom". You did say you have lightroom right? 

                Sent from my iPad

                On Dec 27, 2011, at 8:32 PM, Peter <peter@...> wrote:

                 

                Erik, with all due respect to you and Sacha, your replies are as clear as mud to me.

                All I am asking for is the name of a program or procedure (work flow) for changing TIFFs to JPGs. I don't do my own high-end printing. The people who do that for me -- there is more than one -- want JPGs. I finish making a blended and stitched panoramic and I have a very large TIFF file. How should I convert it to JPEG and make it smaller and more manageable?

                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Erik Krause <erik.krause@...> wrote:
                >
                > Am 27.12.2011 16:44, schrieb Peter A. Schaible:
                > > Please share with me your favorite software/process/workflow for
                > > converting large TIFFs to JPGs in reasonable sizes that printers like,
                > > but that don't compromise too much detail.
                >
                > What printes do you use? If you don't upload your file I doubt it needs
                > to be jpeg. Jpeg is limited to 30000 pixels each side, so you won't be
                > able to print larger panoramas at a good resolution.
                >
                > If you print on your own local printer I recommend a dedicated printing
                > program which can read a lot of file formats, is color managed and knows
                > about the printer native resolution.
                >
                > You can use a RIP for that but this is an expensive solution. I use
                > QImage to get the best results from my Epson printer. It uses very
                > sophisticated resizing algorithms and allows for roll paper printing
                > even beyond the maximum printable size by printing several chunks
                > without seams and much more... Even if you print online QImage might be
                > a god solution, since it optimizes and formats images for online print
                > services.
                >
                > --
                > Erik Krause
                >

              • Dicere
                You might try this - Open the tif in Photomatrix. Go to utilities and resize to the appropriate image size for printing. (300 pixels per inch. Less and
                Message 7 of 11 , Dec 28, 2011
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                  You might try this -
                  Open the tif in Photomatrix.
                  Go to 'utilities' and 'resize' to the appropriate image size for printing. (300 pixels per inch. Less and you may start seeing dots at a 'normal' viewing distance.)
                  Save file as jpg. (Use high quality setting. If your printer charges by the file size, or sending larger files is a problem, try test prints at lower quality settings for smaller file size, until the jpg compression induced artifacts become objectionable.)
                  Send to printer service.



                  --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "Peter A. Schaible" <peter@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > I manipulate my panoramic images as large TIFF files until I'm
                  > eventually ready to send a final image to a printer, where it needs to
                  > be a JPG file and greatly reduced in size.
                  >
                  > Please share with me your favorite software/process/workflow for
                  > converting large TIFFs to JPGs in reasonable sizes that printers like,
                  > but that don't compromise too much detail.
                  >
                  > BTW, I own Photomatix, PTGui, DxO Optics Pro, and Jasc Paint Shop Pro 8.
                  >
                  > I DO NOT OWN Photoshop (too complicated), and while I DO OWN Lightroom
                  > (also insanely complicated for someone of my limited mental capacity), I
                  > hate it with a passion and never use it unless absolutely necessary, and
                  > then it always inspires weeping, wailing and gnashing of teeth.
                  >
                  > Your thoughts? Thanks in advance for your generous response.
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > --Peter
                  >
                  > Peter A. Schaible
                  >
                • lanebarden
                  Sacha, Try opening up Lightroom and in the Library module (the one you are in when you open it up) choose IMPORT. Find your file and import it. Then with the
                  Message 8 of 11 , Dec 28, 2011
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                    Sacha,

                    Try opening up Lightroom and in the Library module (the one you are in when you open it up) choose IMPORT. Find your file and import it. Then with the thumbnail of your file still highlighted/selected, choose EXPORT. In the dialogue box for format choose JPG, in the finder choose a place in your files to export it or choose desktop - shoot it down the tube
                    and you're done with this.

                    Lane
                    --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Sacha Griffin <sachagriffin@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Lol! Pretty sure your lightroom will do that. If its not available in your
                    > save as dialog, ensure you've changed its mode to 8 bits, then jpg should
                    > show up. Or google "how to save jpg lightroom". You did say you have
                    > lightroom right?
                    >
                    > Sent from my iPad
                    >
                    > On Dec 27, 2011, at 8:32 PM, Peter <peter@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Erik, with all due respect to you and Sacha, your replies are as clear as
                    > mud to me.
                    >
                    > All I am asking for is the name of a program or procedure (work flow) for
                    > changing TIFFs to JPGs. I don't do my own high-end printing. The people who
                    > do that for me -- there is more than one -- want JPGs. I finish making a
                    > blended and stitched panoramic and I have a very large TIFF file. How
                    > should I convert it to JPEG and make it smaller and more manageable?
                    >
                    > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Erik Krause <erik.krause@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Am 27.12.2011 16:44, schrieb Peter A. Schaible:
                    > > > Please share with me your favorite software/process/workflow for
                    > > > converting large TIFFs to JPGs in reasonable sizes that printers like,
                    > > > but that don't compromise too much detail.
                    > >
                    > > What printes do you use? If you don't upload your file I doubt it needs
                    > > to be jpeg. Jpeg is limited to 30000 pixels each side, so you won't be
                    > > able to print larger panoramas at a good resolution.
                    > >
                    > > If you print on your own local printer I recommend a dedicated printing
                    > > program which can read a lot of file formats, is color managed and knows
                    > > about the printer native resolution.
                    > >
                    > > You can use a RIP for that but this is an expensive solution. I use
                    > > QImage to get the best results from my Epson printer. It uses very
                    > > sophisticated resizing algorithms and allows for roll paper printing
                    > > even beyond the maximum printable size by printing several chunks
                    > > without seams and much more... Even if you print online QImage might be
                    > > a god solution, since it optimizes and formats images for online print
                    > > services.
                    > >
                    > > --
                    > > Erik Krause
                    > >
                    >
                  • Christian Bloch
                    Your problem is right there. Lightroom is not something you d use every once in a while, it is the center of the digital image management. Get a book on
                    Message 9 of 11 , Dec 28, 2011
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                      Your problem is right there. Lightroom is not something you'd use every once in a while, it is the center of the digital image management. Get a book on Lightroom if you can't figure it out on your own.


                      On Dec 27, 2011, at 7:44 AM, Peter A. Schaible wrote:

                      I DO OWN Lightroom …., I hate it with a passion and never use it unless absolutely necessary,

                    • Ken Warner
                      I finally got Lightroom and it s the best raw converter I ve used. I will do everything you need and it s really simple to use once you figure out it s
                      Message 10 of 11 , Dec 28, 2011
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                        I finally got Lightroom and it's the best raw converter I've used. I will do everything you need and it's really simple to use once you figure out it's catalog model.

                        One thing, I like NeatImage noise removal better than Lightroom's but NeatImage can be used with Lightroom.

                        Take some time to learn it. Well worth the effort.

                        Christian Bloch wrote:
                        > Your problem is right there. Lightroom is not something you'd use every once in a while, it is the center of the digital image management. Get a book on Lightroom if you can't figure it out on your own.
                        >
                        >
                        > On Dec 27, 2011, at 7:44 AM, Peter A. Schaible wrote:
                        >
                        >> I DO OWN Lightroom …., I hate it with a passion and never use it unless absolutely necessary,
                        >
                        >
                      • Erik Krause
                        ... For best printing results don t convert. If you need to convert use the highest possible quality setting. If you have a file size limitation first reduce
                        Message 11 of 11 , Dec 30, 2011
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                          Am 28.12.2011 02:31, schrieb Peter:
                          > I finish making a blended and stitched panoramic and I have a very
                          > large TIFF file. How should I convert it to JPEG and make it smaller
                          > and more manageable?

                          For best printing results don't convert. If you need to convert use the
                          highest possible quality setting. If you have a file size limitation
                          first reduce pixel size to a tolerable value. This depends on how large
                          the image will be and how it will be shown: 300 ppi for high quality
                          prints, 150 ppi for medium quality, 75 ppi for posters that will be
                          viewed from a distance. Then reduce quality until below file size limit.
                          This should be possible with any image editor or viewer.

                          --
                          Erik Krause
                          http://www.erik-krause.de
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