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Re: grandfather's slides

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  • robert
    Having organized contact sheets is even more important as the number of images increases. However, you approach this you need a system to catalog the images
    Message 1 of 24 , Sep 28, 2011
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      Having organized contact sheets is even more important as the number of images increases. However, you approach this you need a system to catalog the images from the digital proofs to the physical copies. Otherwise you will spend hours looking for the slide you want.

      I would suggest the same approach here, just put n number of slides onto a flatbed scanner, scan at a relatively low res, print it, label it, take that set of slides and put them in sleeves. Then put all the contact prints and matching slides in the same container.

      Good Luck,

      Robert

      --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "prague" <panoramas@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks Robert, yes I know :) that was for my dad. Different situation, and much fewer slides. This time there are more slides and none of them are in sleeves.
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "robert" <image360@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Seems like we've been here before, did this not work?
      > >
      > > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/PanoToolsNG/message/43969
      > >
      > > cheers,
      > >
      > > Robert
      > >
      > > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Martin <panoramas@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I have taken possession of my grandfather's slides. Around 10,000 of them, I
      > > > guess. Spanning 4 decades or so. Images from many different countries.
      > > > Mostly kodachrome. Shot with a leica rangefinder camera. Stored in a cabinet
      > > > in a basement all this time, under very good climate control.
      > > >
      > > > I've come to the following conclusions:
      > > >
      > > > 1) I don't trust anyone else in the family to store these :-O Someone might
      > > > stick them in a hot attic or something.
      > > > 2) Commercial scanning services cost too much for an inferior resultt.
      > > > 3) Scanning all these "the right way" professionally will be WAY too
      > > > expensive.
      > > > 4) Scanning them at home "the right way" will take too long. I don't have
      > > > _years_ of my life to devote to this, not yet anyway.
      > > >
      > > > Therefore I think I need to batch scan them at home. I have found two
      > > > possibilities:
      > > > 1) http://www.filmscanner.info/en/ReflectaDigitDia5000.html the Reflecta
      > > > digit dia 5000
      > > > 2) nikon coolscan 5000 with a slide feeder
      > > > http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nikon-SF-210-Slide-Feeder-Sf-210/dp/B0001AVVRA
      > > >
      > > > I will use either silverfast or vuescan software. After bulk scanning
      > > > everything I'll be able to go back and rescan any masterpieces individually
      > > > as needed.
      > > >
      > > > Have I made any incorrect assumptions above? Can anyone advise something I
      > > > might have missed? I guess that even scanning them in bulk like this might
      > > > take a couple of years of my spare time, but I'm willing to do that.
      > > >
      > > > Oh, and yes, I hope to start a blog with all these images ;)
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • L.D.I. Felipe B. González
      Hi! I use this scanner for my old family slides and negatives:
      Message 2 of 24 , Sep 28, 2011
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        Hi!

        I use this scanner for my old family slides and negatives: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/758586-REG/Wolverine_F2D300_7_3_Megapixel_35mm_Negatives.html

        It´s not a high end resolution nor color definition, but it helps me sort easily what slides need a professional scan.

        Best regards from the subtropical regions of México

        2011/9/28 robert <image360@...>
         

        Having organized contact sheets is even more important as the number of images increases. However, you approach this you need a system to catalog the images from the digital proofs to the physical copies. Otherwise you will spend hours looking for the slide you want.

        I would suggest the same approach here, just put n number of slides onto a flatbed scanner, scan at a relatively low res, print it, label it, take that set of slides and put them in sleeves. Then put all the contact prints and matching slides in the same container.

        Good Luck,

        Robert

        --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "prague" <panoramas@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks Robert, yes I know :) that was for my dad. Different situation, and much fewer slides. This time there are more slides and none of them are in sleeves.
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, "robert" <image360@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Seems like we've been here before, did this not work?
        > >
        > > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/PanoToolsNG/message/43969
        > >
        > > cheers,
        > >
        > > Robert
        > >
        > > --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Martin <panoramas@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I have taken possession of my grandfather's slides. Around 10,000 of them, I
        > > > guess. Spanning 4 decades or so. Images from many different countries.
        > > > Mostly kodachrome. Shot with a leica rangefinder camera. Stored in a cabinet
        > > > in a basement all this time, under very good climate control.
        > > >
        > > > I've come to the following conclusions:
        > > >
        > > > 1) I don't trust anyone else in the family to store these :-O Someone might
        > > > stick them in a hot attic or something.
        > > > 2) Commercial scanning services cost too much for an inferior resultt.
        > > > 3) Scanning all these "the right way" professionally will be WAY too
        > > > expensive.
        > > > 4) Scanning them at home "the right way" will take too long. I don't have
        > > > _years_ of my life to devote to this, not yet anyway.
        > > >
        > > > Therefore I think I need to batch scan them at home. I have found two
        > > > possibilities:
        > > > 1) http://www.filmscanner.info/en/ReflectaDigitDia5000.html the Reflecta
        > > > digit dia 5000
        > > > 2) nikon coolscan 5000 with a slide feeder
        > > > http://www.amazon.co.uk/Nikon-SF-210-Slide-Feeder-Sf-210/dp/B0001AVVRA
        > > >
        > > > I will use either silverfast or vuescan software. After bulk scanning
        > > > everything I'll be able to go back and rescan any masterpieces individually
        > > > as needed.
        > > >
        > > > Have I made any incorrect assumptions above? Can anyone advise something I
        > > > might have missed? I guess that even scanning them in bulk like this might
        > > > take a couple of years of my spare time, but I'm willing to do that.
        > > >
        > > > Oh, and yes, I hope to start a blog with all these images ;)
        > > >
        > >
        >




        --
        L.D.I. Felipe B. González C.
        felipe@...
        1998-5246
        www.fpk.com.mx
        http://recorridosvirtualesmexico.blogspot.com/

        Socio Director Maquetas Virtuales www.maquetasvirtuales.com
        Socio Director Recorridos Virtuales www.recorridosvirtuales.com
      • luca vascon
        Hi Jeff!! ... Loook who is here?! I had a Nikon Coolscan in university. That crappy feeder won t last 10.000 slides without repair. It won t work on Kodachrome
        Message 3 of 24 , Oct 18, 2011
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          Hi Jeff!!
          :-)
          Loook who is here?!

          I had a Nikon Coolscan in university.

          That crappy feeder won't last 10.000 slides without repair.
          It won't work on Kodachrome paper slide frames
          it won't work on gepe glass slide frames
          it will hung on different frame thickness
          Digital ICE won't work on Kodachrome

          but it is a better scanner then Reflecta, but if you wand a slide scanner for 35mm alone, the 5400 Konica Minolta is FAR better choice than the 5000ED in many senses.

          I was very very happy with Epson V750, and own an old 4870. Intelligent choice if you need to scan medium, large or strange film formats.


          IMHO choices are two:
          1- the Reflecta
          2- a very intensive modding of a Kodak Carousel or Rollei hi-end projector (computer controllable via rs232)
          Calibrated LED light, substitution of optics with a dedicated camera+macro lens.
          I'd choose a Canon550D for remotability.


          2011/9/26 prague <panoramas@...>

          LOL

          I love this list :)

          Yes, I can certainly wait 8 years until our robot overlords reach a prepubescent phase. In some ways this is the best answer - worrying about it later is just very appealing to me :)

          Only question is, how to "whack together an archival-grade vault" ? I would guess that this might not be quite as simple as Blochi suggests.

          For now the slides have been moved to self storage in a facility, in a large warehouse that is climate-controlled. with autumn and winter approaching I think all is ok, but I should move them into a better place relatively soon I think.

          My only question - will such software really continue evolving? We won't run out of slides to scan in the next years? I mean, the technology of scanning slides isn't exactly at the forefront of consumer demand, is it.



          --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Christian Bloch <Blochi@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Jeffrey,
          >
          > I wholeheartedly agree with Wim.
          >
          > Whack together an archival-grade vault, can't be harder than modding a PC case. Some humidity and temperature controller. And your slides will outlive any digital image file you could make today. Not only bit rod, but also in terms of quality processing. Wait 5 or 8 years. Then it will sound silly to you to edit with the crappy tools we have today. I still believe in the HDR revolution, and your slides may have so much latitude that you'd have to be concerned to A) scan all it all, and B) preserve it during postprocessing. You'd have to tonemap it today, irreversibly squeeze and push to fit in through our current 8-bit pipelines. In 3 years you won't have to do this anymore, and in 5 you will just shake your head about how badly we treated our image data these days. And when you wait 8, Wim's AI will be happy to do it for you. But don't wait 13 years, because then you will actually have to discuss with the AI and convince it or bribe it for a favor.  ;)
          >
          > Blochi
          >




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          Luca Vascon.

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          www.officinepanottiche.com

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