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Re: [PanoToolsNG] Re: A few stitching errors ..

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  • Rodolpho Pajuaba
    Yes, I saw the link on the previous post; I was wrong :-) . The effect is very cool!! But, when inverted, the holes that were very clear would become black.
    Message 1 of 16 , Aug 27, 2011
      Yes, I saw the link on the previous post; I was wrong :-) . The effect
      is very cool!! But, when inverted, the holes that were very clear
      would become black.

      2011/8/27 Erik Krause <erik.krause@...>:
      > Am 27.08.2011 20:02, schrieb Rodolpho Pajuaba:
      >> If he didn't do it digitally (very unlikely) it's just a matter of
      >> putting the mesh of 16mm negatives over a light table and shoot. After
      >> inverted that's (kind of) what you can get.
      >
      > Negatives are transparent. You would see through...
      >
      > He writes: "I use positive 16mm movie film that I cut and load in a
      > large format camera."
      > -> http://www.parisbeijingphotogallery.com/main/seunghoonparkworks.asp


      --
      Rodolpho Pajuaba
      www.pajuaba.com.br/heterose
      www.pajuaba.com.br/panoblog
      www.pajuaba.com.br/traduzindophotoshop
      Follow me on Twitter - @rpajuaba
    • Bjørn K Nilssen
      ... What if he sprayed a white paint on the backside of each strip to make it opaque? Wouldn t it be like printing with ink on a white paper? Or would the
      Message 2 of 16 , Aug 27, 2011
        På Sat, 27 Aug 2011 19:48:23 +0200, skrev Erik Krause <erik.krause@...>:

        > Am 27.08.2011 14:31, schrieb Will:
        >> I think it is 16mm film of two different iso ratings interwoven and
        >> perhaps sandwiched between glass in a 8x10 format (15 images wide x
        >> 16mm = 240mm or 10 inches). Or the film could be interwoven, exposed
        >> and the warp and the woof developed separately but I think it was all
        >> processed together. Note discoloration at the edges where the strips
        >> meet.
        >
        > It seems to be 16mm film indeed. Compare the sprocket holes:
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:16mmBWrevDP.png
        >
        > It should be possible to identify the film by the numbers printed along
        > the sides. I could read J72, but didn't find that f.e. on
        > http://www.paulivester.com/films/filmstock/guide.htm
        >
        > Still no idea how he got the film nontransparent (you can see through
        > the sprocket holes)...

        What if he sprayed a white paint on the backside of each strip to make it opaque?
        Wouldn't it be like printing with ink on a white paper?
        Or would the positive film require light behind it?


        --
        Bjørn K Nilssen - http://bknilssen.no - 3D and panoramas.
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