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cubic panoramas as bitmap files

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  • Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester)
    Hi All, I intend to write a bit of custom opengl software to display a panorama and am considering what types of of panos I would like to support. Supporting
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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      Hi All,
      I intend to write a bit of custom opengl software to display a panorama
      and am considering what types of of panos I would like to support.
      Supporting cubic panos seems the most sensible as it simply requires
      rendering 6 appropriately-textured squares. However, any such file would
      probably need to be some form easily readable raster file format (like a
      windows bitmap). However, it is not clear to me that cubic panoramas are
      usually available in bitmap format. Cubic panos always seem to be in
      Quick time format which I don't really want to get involved with. Is
      this observation right and is there an easy way to convert
      typically-available cubic panos to bimap formats?.

      Thanks in advance,
      Dave

      ********************************************************************
      This email and any attachments are confidential to the intended
      recipient and may also be privileged. If you are not the intended
      recipient please delete it from your system and notify the sender.
      You should not copy it or use it for any purpose nor disclose or
      distribute its contents to any other person.
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jan Martin
      Hi Dave, the most universal format for panorama is the equirectangular format. It s the format all panorama programs can create/read/display. This Google
      Message 2 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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        Hi Dave,

        the most universal format for panorama is the "equirectangular" format.
        It's the format all panorama programs can create/read/display.

        This Google search gives lots of examples:
        http://www.google.com/search?q=equirectangular+panorama&oe=utf-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&sout=1&biw=1280&bih=576

        Most panorama you can get your hand on will have this format.

        It is my understanding that most panorama photographers (and the companies
        that make software for them) go to great lengths to make sure one CANNOT
        extract the panoramas from Quicktime of flash files.

        So your best bet is to go for the "equirectangular" format for input.
        Obviously there are programs to convert a equirectangular panorama into all
        the other formats.

        Free hugin in a good start for this: http://hugin.sourceforge.net
        On the "Stitch" tab there are many projections to pick from.

        A good overview on all things panoramic is: http://wiki.panotools.org

        I am still hoping that someday someone will write a program that stitches
        panoramas using the graphic card only.

        Interested?

        Jan




        On Thu, Aug 25, 2011 at 5:23 PM, Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) <
        dave.m.moore@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > Hi All,
        > I intend to write a bit of custom opengl software to display a panorama
        > and am considering what types of of panos I would like to support.
        > Supporting cubic panos seems the most sensible as it simply requires
        > rendering 6 appropriately-textured squares. However, any such file would
        > probably need to be some form easily readable raster file format (like a
        > windows bitmap). However, it is not clear to me that cubic panoramas are
        > usually available in bitmap format. Cubic panos always seem to be in
        > Quick time format which I don't really want to get involved with. Is
        > this observation right and is there an easy way to convert
        > typically-available cubic panos to bimap formats?.
        >
        > Thanks in advance,
        > Dave
        >
        > ********************************************************************
        > This email and any attachments are confidential to the intended
        > recipient and may also be privileged. If you are not the intended
        > recipient please delete it from your system and notify the sender.
        > You should not copy it or use it for any purpose nor disclose or
        > distribute its contents to any other person.
        > ********************************************************************
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        --
        http://www.DIY-streetview.org


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ian Wood
        ... The QTVR format is relatively well documented. Here are a couple of PHP parsers for extracting the tiles for display in other viewers:
        Message 3 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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          On 25 Aug 2011, at 16:49, Jan Martin wrote:

          > It is my understanding that most panorama photographers (and the companies
          > that make software for them) go to great lengths to make sure one CANNOT
          > extract the panoramas from Quicktime of flash files.

          The QTVR format is relatively well documented. Here are a couple of PHP parsers for extracting the tiles for display in other viewers:
          http://fieldofview.com/spv-dev/projects/qtparser
          http://www.erik-krause.de/index.htm?./qtkrparse/

          Dave - your best bet is to parse QTVR files or work out how to support equirectangular source images, as Jan says they are the standard 'source' format.

          Ian
        • Ken Warner
          If I understand your question correctly and based on my experience doing something similar, you need an array of rgb values. The only practical format for web
          Message 4 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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            If I understand your question correctly and based on my experience doing something similar, you need an array of rgb values.

            The only practical format for web published images is jpeg so you need a jpeg reader to convert the image file into an array of rgb values.

            As I recall, OpenGL uses rgb arrays for their textures. WRT: formats. You should probably start with 6 separate cube face files.

            Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) wrote:
            > Hi All,
            > I intend to write a bit of custom opengl software to display a panorama
            > and am considering what types of of panos I would like to support.
            > Supporting cubic panos seems the most sensible as it simply requires
            > rendering 6 appropriately-textured squares. However, any such file would
            > probably need to be some form easily readable raster file format (like a
            > windows bitmap). However, it is not clear to me that cubic panoramas are
            > usually available in bitmap format. Cubic panos always seem to be in
            > Quick time format which I don't really want to get involved with. Is
            > this observation right and is there an easy way to convert
            > typically-available cubic panos to bimap formats?.
            >
            > Thanks in advance,
            > Dave
            >
            > ********************************************************************
            > This email and any attachments are confidential to the intended
            > recipient and may also be privileged. If you are not the intended
            > recipient please delete it from your system and notify the sender.
            > You should not copy it or use it for any purpose nor disclose or
            > distribute its contents to any other person.
            > ********************************************************************
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
          • Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester)
            Thanks everyone. I think the answer is to go with equirectangular format and render this onto the inside of sphere - more complex than cubic. I assume that
            Message 5 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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              Thanks everyone. I think the answer is to go with equirectangular format
              and render this onto the inside of sphere - more complex than cubic. I
              assume that this will result in the correct projection.

              Dave

              -----Original Message-----
              From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of Jan Martin
              Sent: 25 August 2011 16:50
              To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] cubic panoramas as bitmap files


              *** WARNING ***

              This message has originated outside your organisation,
              either from an external partner or the Global Internet.
              Keep this in mind if you answer this message.


              Hi Dave,

              the most universal format for panorama is the "equirectangular" format.
              It's the format all panorama programs can create/read/display.

              This Google search gives lots of examples:
              http://www.google.com/search?q=equirectangular+panorama&oe=utf-8&um=1&ie
              =UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&sout=1&biw=1280&bih=576

              Most panorama you can get your hand on will have this format.

              It is my understanding that most panorama photographers (and the
              companies that make software for them) go to great lengths to make sure
              one CANNOT extract the panoramas from Quicktime of flash files.

              So your best bet is to go for the "equirectangular" format for input.
              Obviously there are programs to convert a equirectangular panorama into
              all the other formats.

              Free hugin in a good start for this: http://hugin.sourceforge.net On the
              "Stitch" tab there are many projections to pick from.

              A good overview on all things panoramic is: http://wiki.panotools.org

              I am still hoping that someday someone will write a program that
              stitches panoramas using the graphic card only.

              Interested?

              Jan




              On Thu, Aug 25, 2011 at 5:23 PM, Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) <
              dave.m.moore@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > Hi All,
              > I intend to write a bit of custom opengl software to display a
              > panorama and am considering what types of of panos I would like to
              support.
              > Supporting cubic panos seems the most sensible as it simply requires
              > rendering 6 appropriately-textured squares. However, any such file
              > would probably need to be some form easily readable raster file format

              > (like a windows bitmap). However, it is not clear to me that cubic
              > panoramas are usually available in bitmap format. Cubic panos always
              > seem to be in Quick time format which I don't really want to get
              > involved with. Is this observation right and is there an easy way to
              > convert typically-available cubic panos to bimap formats?.
              >
              > Thanks in advance,
              > Dave
              >
              > ********************************************************************
              > This email and any attachments are confidential to the intended
              > recipient and may also be privileged. If you are not the intended
              > recipient please delete it from your system and notify the sender.
              > You should not copy it or use it for any purpose nor disclose or
              > distribute its contents to any other person.
              > ********************************************************************
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >



              --
              http://www.DIY-streetview.org


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              ------------------------------------

              --
            • Ian Wood
              It should, but watch out for problems at the poles. Ian
              Message 6 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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                It should, but watch out for problems at the poles.

                Ian

                On 25 Aug 2011, at 17:26, Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) wrote:

                >
                > Thanks everyone. I think the answer is to go with equirectangular format
                > and render this onto the inside of sphere - more complex than cubic. I
                > assume that this will result in the correct projection.
                >
                > Dave
              • Ken Warner
                That is the absolutely most complicated way to do it. But good luck...
                Message 7 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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                  That is the absolutely most complicated way to do it. But good luck...

                  Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) wrote:
                  >
                  > Thanks everyone. I think the answer is to go with equirectangular format
                  > and render this onto the inside of sphere - more complex than cubic. I
                  > assume that this will result in the correct projection.
                  >
                  > Dave
                  >
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com]
                  > On Behalf Of Jan Martin
                  > Sent: 25 August 2011 16:50
                  > To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] cubic panoramas as bitmap files
                  >
                  >
                  > *** WARNING ***
                  >
                  > This message has originated outside your organisation,
                  > either from an external partner or the Global Internet.
                  > Keep this in mind if you answer this message.
                  >
                  >
                  > Hi Dave,
                  >
                  > the most universal format for panorama is the "equirectangular" format.
                  > It's the format all panorama programs can create/read/display.
                  >
                  > This Google search gives lots of examples:
                  > http://www.google.com/search?q=equirectangular+panorama&oe=utf-8&um=1&ie
                  > =UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&sout=1&biw=1280&bih=576
                  >
                  > Most panorama you can get your hand on will have this format.
                  >
                  > It is my understanding that most panorama photographers (and the
                  > companies that make software for them) go to great lengths to make sure
                  > one CANNOT extract the panoramas from Quicktime of flash files.
                  >
                  > So your best bet is to go for the "equirectangular" format for input.
                  > Obviously there are programs to convert a equirectangular panorama into
                  > all the other formats.
                  >
                  > Free hugin in a good start for this: http://hugin.sourceforge.net On the
                  > "Stitch" tab there are many projections to pick from.
                  >
                  > A good overview on all things panoramic is: http://wiki.panotools.org
                  >
                  > I am still hoping that someday someone will write a program that
                  > stitches panoramas using the graphic card only.
                  >
                  > Interested?
                  >
                  > Jan
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On Thu, Aug 25, 2011 at 5:23 PM, Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) <
                  > dave.m.moore@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >> **
                  >>
                  >>
                  >> Hi All,
                  >> I intend to write a bit of custom opengl software to display a
                  >> panorama and am considering what types of of panos I would like to
                  > support.
                  >> Supporting cubic panos seems the most sensible as it simply requires
                  >> rendering 6 appropriately-textured squares. However, any such file
                  >> would probably need to be some form easily readable raster file format
                  >
                  >> (like a windows bitmap). However, it is not clear to me that cubic
                  >> panoramas are usually available in bitmap format. Cubic panos always
                  >> seem to be in Quick time format which I don't really want to get
                  >> involved with. Is this observation right and is there an easy way to
                  >> convert typically-available cubic panos to bimap formats?.
                  >>
                  >> Thanks in advance,
                  >> Dave
                  >>
                  >> ********************************************************************
                  >> This email and any attachments are confidential to the intended
                  >> recipient and may also be privileged. If you are not the intended
                  >> recipient please delete it from your system and notify the sender.
                  >> You should not copy it or use it for any purpose nor disclose or
                  >> distribute its contents to any other person.
                  >> ********************************************************************
                  >>
                  >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > http://www.DIY-streetview.org
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                • Jan Martin
                  Ian, the proven approach for a proper result at the Zenith and Nadir is to on the fly convert the equirectangular input image to cube faces, then propject the
                  Message 8 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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                    Ian,

                    the proven approach for a proper result at the Zenith and Nadir is to on the
                    fly convert the equirectangular input image to cube faces, then propject the
                    cube faces.

                    http://www.google.com/search?client=ubuntu&channel=fs&q=qube+faces&oe=utf-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&sout=1&biw=1280&bih=576

                    Jan

                    On Thu, Aug 25, 2011 at 6:32 PM, Ken Warner <kwarner000@...> wrote:

                    > **
                    >
                    >
                    > That is the absolutely most complicated way to do it. But good luck...
                    >
                    >
                    > Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Thanks everyone. I think the answer is to go with equirectangular format
                    > > and render this onto the inside of sphere - more complex than cubic. I
                    > > assume that this will result in the correct projection.
                    > >
                    > > Dave
                    > >
                    > > -----Original Message-----
                    > > From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com]
                    > > On Behalf Of Jan Martin
                    > > Sent: 25 August 2011 16:50
                    > > To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
                    > > Subject: Re: [PanoToolsNG] cubic panoramas as bitmap files
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > *** WARNING ***
                    > >
                    > > This message has originated outside your organisation,
                    > > either from an external partner or the Global Internet.
                    > > Keep this in mind if you answer this message.
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > Hi Dave,
                    > >
                    > > the most universal format for panorama is the "equirectangular" format.
                    > > It's the format all panorama programs can create/read/display.
                    > >
                    > > This Google search gives lots of examples:
                    > > http://www.google.com/search?q=equirectangular+panorama&oe=utf-8&um=1&ie
                    > > =UTF-8&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi&sout=1&biw=1280&bih=576
                    > >
                    > > Most panorama you can get your hand on will have this format.
                    > >
                    > > It is my understanding that most panorama photographers (and the
                    > > companies that make software for them) go to great lengths to make sure
                    > > one CANNOT extract the panoramas from Quicktime of flash files.
                    > >
                    > > So your best bet is to go for the "equirectangular" format for input.
                    > > Obviously there are programs to convert a equirectangular panorama into
                    > > all the other formats.
                    > >
                    > > Free hugin in a good start for this: http://hugin.sourceforge.net On the
                    > > "Stitch" tab there are many projections to pick from.
                    > >
                    > > A good overview on all things panoramic is: http://wiki.panotools.org
                    > >
                    > > I am still hoping that someday someone will write a program that
                    > > stitches panoramas using the graphic card only.
                    > >
                    > > Interested?
                    > >
                    > > Jan
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > On Thu, Aug 25, 2011 at 5:23 PM, Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) <
                    > > dave.m.moore@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > >> **
                    > >>
                    > >>
                    > >> Hi All,
                    > >> I intend to write a bit of custom opengl software to display a
                    > >> panorama and am considering what types of of panos I would like to
                    > > support.
                    > >> Supporting cubic panos seems the most sensible as it simply requires
                    > >> rendering 6 appropriately-textured squares. However, any such file
                    > >> would probably need to be some form easily readable raster file format
                    > >
                    > >> (like a windows bitmap). However, it is not clear to me that cubic
                    > >> panoramas are usually available in bitmap format. Cubic panos always
                    > >> seem to be in Quick time format which I don't really want to get
                    > >> involved with. Is this observation right and is there an easy way to
                    > >> convert typically-available cubic panos to bimap formats?.
                    > >>
                    > >> Thanks in advance,
                    > >> Dave
                    > >>
                    > >> ********************************************************************
                    > >> This email and any attachments are confidential to the intended
                    > >> recipient and may also be privileged. If you are not the intended
                    > >> recipient please delete it from your system and notify the sender.
                    > >> You should not copy it or use it for any purpose nor disclose or
                    > >> distribute its contents to any other person.
                    > >> ********************************************************************
                    > >>
                    > >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >>
                    > >>
                    > >>
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > --
                    > > http://www.DIY-streetview.org
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > ------------------------------------
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >



                    --
                    http://www.DIY-streetview.org


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Ian Wood
                    Agreed 100%. Ian
                    Message 9 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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                      Agreed 100%.

                      Ian

                      On 25 Aug 2011, at 17:44, Jan Martin wrote:

                      > Ian,
                      >
                      > the proven approach for a proper result at the Zenith and Nadir is to on the
                      > fly convert the equirectangular input image to cube faces, then propject the
                      > cube faces.
                    • Ken Warner
                      I did something different in my Java viewer. I did a map projection treating the equirect as a sphere and projecting portions onto a the flat viewport. It
                      Message 10 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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                        I did something different in my Java viewer. I did a map projection treating the equirect as a sphere and projecting portions onto a the flat viewport. It was really complicated and hard. Java doesn't have texture mapping and I didn't want to do it like Dr. Dersch did in his Java viewer -- because I didn't understand the way he did it.

                        Cube faces in OpenGL are a no brainer. 6 texture maps and you are done.

                        Ian Wood wrote:
                        > Agreed 100%.
                        >
                        > Ian
                        >
                        > On 25 Aug 2011, at 17:44, Jan Martin wrote:
                        >
                        >> Ian,
                        >>
                        >> the proven approach for a proper result at the Zenith and Nadir is to on the
                        >> fly convert the equirectangular input image to cube faces, then propject the
                        >> cube faces.
                        >
                        >
                      • Jim Watters
                        ... Equirectangular is the format as the result of stitching. Most current panorama viewers use cube faces, and most people publishing panorama to the web
                        Message 11 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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                          On 2011-08-25 1:26 PM, Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) wrote:
                          >
                          > I think the answer is to go with equirectangular format and render
                          > this onto the inside of sphere - more complex than cubic. I
                          > assume that this will result in the correct projection.
                          >
                          > Dave
                          >
                          Equirectangular is the format as the result of stitching.
                          Most current panorama viewers use cube faces, and most people publishing
                          panorama to the web create the cube faces from the stitched equirectangular
                          file. Some viewers can display both. Being able to use a local viewer on the PC
                          to display a Equirectangular image is useful to quickly see how the current
                          stitching went.

                          The math to project a equirectangular format to a sphere is more complicated and
                          a bit more time consuming. Frame rates will be slower. The zenith and nadir
                          usually show artifacts when using this format.

                          One of the advantages to cube faces is the ability to use less memory to display
                          the result. Only the cube faces viable need be loaded. This also allows to
                          display larger panoramas.
                          Cube faces can be broken down further into smaller tiles. Equirectangular format
                          can be also broken down into tiles.
                          To display gigapixel size panoramas tiles are required. Tiles or small faces are
                          also required to display a relatively small panorama on a mobile device that has
                          limited memory.

                          Many current viewers use xml file format to specify the files that make up the
                          panorama. And in the case of Quicktime QTVR format and Flash SWF formats all the
                          information and images can be embeded into a single file.

                          Here is some other viewers and their documentation of the formats they use. I
                          would try to follow one of their examples.

                          Spi-v
                          http://fieldofview.com/spv-dev/docs/nodes/panoelement

                          Pano2VR
                          http://gardengnomesoftware.com/wiki/Pano2VR_-_Flash_Output_Settings

                          FSPViewer
                          http://www.fsoft.it/panorama/FSPViewer.htm

                          Flash Panoramas Viewer
                          http://flashpanoramas.com/player/simple/

                          --
                          Jim Watters
                          http://photocreations.ca
                        • Roger Howard
                          ... You ve already had some excellent responses, however some key points. 1. Yes, supporting cubes is relatively easy 2. Quicktime VR .mov s are certainly not
                          Message 12 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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                            On Aug 25, 2011, at 8:23 AM, Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) wrote:

                            > Hi All,
                            > I intend to write a bit of custom opengl software to display a panorama
                            > and am considering what types of of panos I would like to support.
                            > Supporting cubic panos seems the most sensible as it simply requires
                            > rendering 6 appropriately-textured squares. However, any such file would
                            > probably need to be some form easily readable raster file format (like a
                            > windows bitmap). However, it is not clear to me that cubic panoramas are
                            > usually available in bitmap format. Cubic panos always seem to be in
                            > Quick time format which I don't really want to get involved with. Is
                            > this observation right and is there an easy way to convert
                            > typically-available cubic panos to bimap formats?.
                            >

                            You've already had some excellent responses, however some key points.

                            1. Yes, supporting cubes is relatively easy
                            2. Quicktime VR .mov's are certainly not the only form we see cubes stored and used in. Many pano players support cubes - either as (one of) their input formats, and/or as their internal representation of the panorama (even if sourced, for instance, from an equirectangular image). Many production tools - like Pano2VR, PTGUI, Hugin, etc - support outputing to cube faces in TIFF, JPEG and other file formats. There are also the traditional strips - either 6x1, or in a T- or cross-shape - for storing multiple cube faces in a single bitmap image.
                            3. As others have pointed out, it's relatively straightforward to extract JPEG-encoded cube faces from existing .mov's if necessary, though unless you're supporting legacy files I'd skip this step and work directly with cube faces or equirectangular images in a common bitmap file format.
                            4. OpenGL's wiki has an article on these two approaches to texturing a sphere: http://www.opengl.org/wiki/Texturing_a_Sphere - as mentioned at the top (and by other posters here), using a cube will give you better results. This can be done on the fly (see Creating a Cubemap Texture: http://www.opengl.org/wiki/Common_Mistakes#Creating_a_Cubemap_Texture) , or in post production by outputting cube faces from PTGUI, Pano2VR, extracting from a .mov, etc.

                            Hope this helps,

                            Roger

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Jan Martin
                            Ian, have a look at http://panozona.com/wiki/SaladoConverter It s open source. Starting with an equirectangular panorama, it first creates 6 cube faces, then
                            Message 13 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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                              Ian,

                              have a look at http://panozona.com/wiki/SaladoConverter
                              It's open source.

                              Starting with an equirectangular panorama, it first creates 6 cube faces,
                              then for each cube face multi-resolution tiles.

                              The (web)-player then displays the multi-resolution tiles.

                              In the end you first need to decide what kind of player you like to write.

                              Saladoplayer is high quality and open source and for the web.

                              Panini is a different kind:
                              It displays e.g. local equirectangular panoramas directly and without any
                              fuzz:
                              http://sourceforge.net/projects/pvqt/files/panini/Panini%200.71.100/Panini-0.71.104-src.zip/download

                              http://groups.google.com/group/panini-support/about


                              Extensive list of panorama players:
                              http://wiki.panotools.org/Panorama_Viewers

                              Jan



                              On Thu, Aug 25, 2011 at 7:16 PM, Jim Watters <jwatters@...>wrote:

                              > **
                              >
                              >
                              > On 2011-08-25 1:26 PM, Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) wrote:
                              > >
                              > > I think the answer is to go with equirectangular format and render
                              > > this onto the inside of sphere - more complex than cubic. I
                              > > assume that this will result in the correct projection.
                              > >
                              > > Dave
                              > >
                              > Equirectangular is the format as the result of stitching.
                              > Most current panorama viewers use cube faces, and most people publishing
                              > panorama to the web create the cube faces from the stitched equirectangular
                              >
                              > file. Some viewers can display both. Being able to use a local viewer on
                              > the PC
                              > to display a Equirectangular image is useful to quickly see how the current
                              >
                              > stitching went.
                              >
                              > The math to project a equirectangular format to a sphere is more
                              > complicated and
                              > a bit more time consuming. Frame rates will be slower. The zenith and nadir
                              >
                              > usually show artifacts when using this format.
                              >
                              > One of the advantages to cube faces is the ability to use less memory to
                              > display
                              > the result. Only the cube faces viable need be loaded. This also allows to
                              > display larger panoramas.
                              > Cube faces can be broken down further into smaller tiles. Equirectangular
                              > format
                              > can be also broken down into tiles.
                              > To display gigapixel size panoramas tiles are required. Tiles or small
                              > faces are
                              > also required to display a relatively small panorama on a mobile device
                              > that has
                              > limited memory.
                              >
                              > Many current viewers use xml file format to specify the files that make up
                              > the
                              > panorama. And in the case of Quicktime QTVR format and Flash SWF formats
                              > all the
                              > information and images can be embeded into a single file.
                              >
                              > Here is some other viewers and their documentation of the formats they use.
                              > I
                              > would try to follow one of their examples.
                              >
                              > Spi-v
                              > http://fieldofview.com/spv-dev/docs/nodes/panoelement
                              >
                              > Pano2VR
                              > http://gardengnomesoftware.com/wiki/Pano2VR_-_Flash_Output_Settings
                              >
                              > FSPViewer
                              > http://www.fsoft.it/panorama/FSPViewer.htm
                              >
                              > Flash Panoramas Viewer
                              > http://flashpanoramas.com/player/simple/
                              >
                              > --
                              > Jim Watters
                              > http://photocreations.ca
                              >
                              >
                              >



                              --
                              http://www.DIY-streetview.org


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Adrien Fontvielle
                              Regarding difficulties to project equirectangular onto a sphere (mainly the pole problem), I recommend you to use Platonic Solids (
                              Message 14 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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                                Regarding difficulties to project equirectangular onto a sphere (mainly the
                                pole problem), I recommend you to use Platonic Solids (
                                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Platonic_solid). These are easily (recursively)
                                generated meshes.

                                Computing texture coordinate is then almost straightforward if you
                                understand the geometry being used.

                                However if you want to stick to the cube : refine each face to 50x50 quads
                                and directly compute the right texture coordinates into the equirectangular
                                texture. You will avoid computing 6 temporary cube face textures and
                                manipulating a lot of datas.

                                There are quite some optimisations to do but this kind of code is really
                                fast (I mean far beyond real time for equirectangular texure < some Mo) on a
                                standard pc.



                                Adrien Fontvielle



                                2011/8/25 Roger Howard <rogerhoward@...>

                                > **
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > On Aug 25, 2011, at 8:23 AM, Moore, Dave M (UK Rochester) wrote:
                                >
                                > > Hi All,
                                > > I intend to write a bit of custom opengl software to display a panorama
                                > > and am considering what types of of panos I would like to support.
                                > > Supporting cubic panos seems the most sensible as it simply requires
                                > > rendering 6 appropriately-textured squares. However, any such file would
                                > > probably need to be some form easily readable raster file format (like a
                                > > windows bitmap). However, it is not clear to me that cubic panoramas are
                                > > usually available in bitmap format. Cubic panos always seem to be in
                                > > Quick time format which I don't really want to get involved with. Is
                                > > this observation right and is there an easy way to convert
                                > > typically-available cubic panos to bimap formats?.
                                > >
                                >
                                > You've already had some excellent responses, however some key points.
                                >
                                > 1. Yes, supporting cubes is relatively easy
                                > 2. Quicktime VR .mov's are certainly not the only form we see cubes stored
                                > and used in. Many pano players support cubes - either as (one of) their
                                > input formats, and/or as their internal representation of the panorama (even
                                > if sourced, for instance, from an equirectangular image). Many production
                                > tools - like Pano2VR, PTGUI, Hugin, etc - support outputing to cube faces in
                                > TIFF, JPEG and other file formats. There are also the traditional strips -
                                > either 6x1, or in a T- or cross-shape - for storing multiple cube faces in a
                                > single bitmap image.
                                > 3. As others have pointed out, it's relatively straightforward to extract
                                > JPEG-encoded cube faces from existing .mov's if necessary, though unless
                                > you're supporting legacy files I'd skip this step and work directly with
                                > cube faces or equirectangular images in a common bitmap file format.
                                > 4. OpenGL's wiki has an article on these two approaches to texturing a
                                > sphere: http://www.opengl.org/wiki/Texturing_a_Sphere - as mentioned at
                                > the top (and by other posters here), using a cube will give you better
                                > results. This can be done on the fly (see Creating a Cubemap Texture:
                                > http://www.opengl.org/wiki/Common_Mistakes#Creating_a_Cubemap_Texture) ,
                                > or in post production by outputting cube faces from PTGUI, Pano2VR,
                                > extracting from a .mov, etc.
                                >
                                > Hope this helps,
                                >
                                > Roger
                                >
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >
                                >
                                >


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Ian Wood
                                ... Ian =/= Dave. ;-) Ian
                                Message 15 of 15 , Aug 25, 2011
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                                  On 25 Aug 2011, at 19:17, Jan Martin wrote:

                                  > Ian,

                                  Ian =/= Dave. ;-)

                                  Ian
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