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How to choose an interpolator in PTgui?

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  • Peter
    I am having a fine time stitching with PTgui and often projecting seriously distorted panoramics, making little planets, etc. It s great fun! Having finally
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 21, 2011
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      I am having a fine time stitching with PTgui and often projecting seriously distorted panoramics, making little planets, etc. It's great fun!

      Having finally learned how to make a good stitch, I am puzzled by all the Interpolator settings. The explanations I have found and read online are so technical they make my brain hurt.

      How does one intelligently choose an interpolator in PTgui? Can anyone dumb this down for me?

      Thanks in advance for your kind advice. (I really love this forum!)

      — Peter
    • Sacha Griffin
      Try here. http://wiki.panotools.org/Interpolation http://www.panotools.org/dersch/interpolator/interpolator.html Essentially, there isn t really a best one.
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 21, 2011
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        Try here.



        http://wiki.panotools.org/Interpolation



        http://www.panotools.org/dersch/interpolator/interpolator.html



        Essentially, there isn't really a best one. Even the expensive (time) can
        cause issues (artifacts, ringing) depending on the content.

        I think I generally use lanczos2 for speed and quality that I'm happy with.



        Why don't you do some tests and make some comparisons yourself so that you
        also have an intimate understanding.





        -Sacha Griffin





        From: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com [mailto:PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Peter
        Sent: Thursday, July 21, 2011 4:18 PM
        To: PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [PanoToolsNG] How to choose an interpolator in PTgui?





        I am having a fine time stitching with PTgui and often projecting seriously
        distorted panoramics, making little planets, etc. It's great fun!

        Having finally learned how to make a good stitch, I am puzzled by all the
        Interpolator settings. The explanations I have found and read online are so
        technical they make my brain hurt.

        How does one intelligently choose an interpolator in PTgui? Can anyone dumb
        this down for me?

        Thanks in advance for your kind advice. (I really love this forum!)

        - Peter





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Fulvio Senore
        ... I tested the new antialiased interpolators when they were added to PTGui, some years ago. My opinion is that the best solution is bicubic normal . It is
        Message 3 of 4 , Jul 21, 2011
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          Il 21/07/2011 22.18, Peter ha scritto:
          > I am having a fine time stitching with PTgui and often projecting seriously distorted panoramics, making little planets, etc. It's great fun!
          >
          > Having finally learned how to make a good stitch, I am puzzled by all the Interpolator settings. The explanations I have found and read online are so technical they make my brain hurt.
          >
          > How does one intelligently choose an interpolator in PTgui? Can anyone dumb this down for me?
          >
          > Thanks in advance for your kind advice. (I really love this forum!)
          >

          I tested the new antialiased interpolators when they were added to
          PTGui, some years ago.

          My opinion is that the best solution is "bicubic normal". It is the
          choice that creates a more natural looking result.

          Lanczos adds some sharpening: it might be a good solution for a viewer,
          but I think that it is not a good one for creating images to be saved as
          a new file. There is always time to sharpen, while it is difficult to
          remove an excessive sharpening.

          I have some experience with interpolators, and I doubt that larger
          kernels (higher numbers at the end of the interpolator name) might
          create visibly better images. On the other side, if you have sharp
          edges, you are likely to get worst results than bicubic using those
          interpolators.

          Fulvio Senore
        • Erik Krause
          ... The different interpolators trade of speed against quality. However, all of them except Bilinear and Nearest Neighbor are reasonably good, Lanczos and
          Message 4 of 4 , Jul 21, 2011
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            Am 21.07.2011 22:18, schrieb Peter:

            > How does one intelligently choose an interpolator in PTgui? Can
            > anyone dumb this down for me?

            The different interpolators trade of speed against quality. However, all
            of them except Bilinear and Nearest Neighbor are reasonably good,
            Lanczos and Spline family are even better, the Lanczos family is
            slightly sharpening.

            The larger kernel sizes (larger numbers) preserve small details better,
            especially after several interpolation steps. Jim Watters extended the
            original Dersch test: http://photocreations.ca/interpolator/

            However, the large kernel have disadvantages too, especially for
            graphical structures: http://wiki.panotools.org/Interpolation

            It is worth noting that all PTGui internal interpolators are
            anti-aliased now. There isn't a need to choose a different interpolator
            for downsizing anymore.

            --
            Erik Krause
            Offenburger Str. 33
            79108 Freiburg
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