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OT: shooting art?

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  • Jeffrey Martin
    someone out there must be experienced shooting art reproductions.... i have a question! when shooting art in a gallery, is it sufficient to use 2x halogen work
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 23, 2011
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      someone out there must be experienced shooting art reproductions.... i have
      a question!

      when shooting art in a gallery, is it sufficient to use 2x halogen work
      lights (the kind you buy at the hardware store) pointed at 45º on each side?



      thanks!
      jeffrey


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Fernando Chaves
      ... Hi, These are too yellow, about 2800K. You need more blue waves, specially if shooting digital. Strobes will give you better result (3200K tungsten can be
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 23, 2011
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        Jeffrey Martin wrote:

        > when shooting art in a gallery, is it sufficient to use 2x halogen work
        > lights (the kind you buy at the hardware store) pointed at 45º on each
        > side?
        >
        >
        >
        > thanks!
        > jeffrey

        Hi,
        These are too yellow, about 2800K. You need more blue waves, specially if
        shooting digital. Strobes will give you better result (3200K tungsten can
        be pretty good as well, something like Lowel Tota light.)
        You can try also the 2800K with blue gel filter (Rosco or Lee) and
        shooting a reliable color checker (Xrite passport, for example).
        Any way, if you go tungsten make sure you have no daylight in the same room.
        Best regards,
        Fernando
      • Peter Braatz
        ... Hi Jeffrey, sure you can try this. It will not look very professional nor is it very professional ;-) Are you allowed to use hot light? No flash? Which
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 23, 2011
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          Am 23.06.2011 um 13:14 schrieb Jeffrey Martin:

          > someone out there must be experienced shooting art reproductions.... i have
          > a question!
          >
          > when shooting art in a gallery, is it sufficient to use 2x halogen work
          > lights (the kind you buy at the hardware store) pointed at 45º on each side?
          >

          Hi Jeffrey,

          sure you can try this. It will not look very professional nor is it very professional ;-)
          Are you allowed to use "hot" light? No flash? Which size are the art pieces?

          The work light i know do not have a very even light diffusion. They just reflect the light to the front, meaning you have got more light in the middle and less at the border.

          Professional flashlight reflectors and diffusors are much more even in light distribution. (Just an example: http://www.profoto.com/de/sites/default/files/imagecache/medium/softgridkit_4x6_3.jpg)

          All depending on the level you want to reach :-)

          Cheers - Peter

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • cvoneinem
          ... Yeah sure, if you promise to also use a Holga ( ) for the job ;-) Depending on the size of the artwork
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 23, 2011
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            --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Martin wrote:
            >
            > someone out there must be experienced shooting art
            > reproductions.... i have a question!
            > when shooting art in a gallery, is it sufficient to
            > use 2x halogen work lights (the kind you buy at the
            > hardware store) pointed at 45° on each side?

            Yeah sure, if you promise to also use a Holga (<http://microsites.lomography.com/holga/history>) for the job ;-)

            Depending on the size of the artwork usually 2 lights will work but I'll never even try with those DIY flood lights you describe.

            For one you'll show the gallery owner that you don't respect the artwork at all and furthermore you will most likely run into a lot of trouble to achieve professional results in the given time.
            There are some good reasons why there still is a market for professional halogen light units and the right type of lamps. The 1KW and 1.25KW U-type lamps in this list <http://www.hedler.com/produkte/service/lamps.htm> will ensure a constant light temperature over their life cycle. You don't want two different colours coming from both sides...

            I used to shoot reproductions of very expensive artwork (paintings and also objects) in the 1990ies and later for several art catalogs. I've also worked with flash but always favoured tungsten, especially for objects.

            Assure even light distribution by measuring with a light meter. White umbrellas often help...

            Be careful to not let stray light shine into the lens (as a test look into the lens from the direction of the artwork to see if you still see reflections in the lens). Also make sure you don't let your light fall on coloured areas like e.g. a wooden floor that may affect the colours of the artwork. A lot of black cloth is great to cover all these areas around your object.

            Carl
          • mrjimbo
            Hi Jeff, Read several of the posts in response.. Their good and helpful. I agree , don t use halogen. Especially work lights as the reflectors in them will
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 23, 2011
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              Hi Jeff,
              Read several of the posts in response.. Their good and helpful. I agree , don't use halogen. Especially work lights as the reflectors in them will further change the light color. Also it difficult to get two halogens to emit the same color light unless you get high end ones.
              I think your easiest way out, but you may not want to do this, is to simply rent a power pack and two professional strobe units..( it's cheaper then you think) .
              The reason I'm suggesting this is strobes are a good way to go but you still want a visible light source so you can see if your getting any reflections and need to polarize.. This type unit has a modeling light built in.. If polarizing needs to happen then you'll need large sheets of Polar film to put over the lights and typically they have holders for this on this type of light and may also provide the polar film at the rental shop for your use...(it's not cheap)
              If you just use the regular small strobes that you typically associate with DSLR's you won't know if you're getting spectral highlights until after you do an exposure and if the shows up and your not prepared you're screwed. You'll also want a light meter or flash meter so you can make sure that the light is evenly distributed across the piece (this isn't as easy as you may think...especially on large pieces) Get all for corners within a 10th of a stop of each other and make sure you good in the middle of the job. If you end up having to polarize then you need some muscle in the lights as you have to put Polarizing film over the lights and also use a polarizer so your loosing light in two places ....not just one.. We typically use a couple Elinchrome 6000WS micro packs and 3000WS heads with square reflectors that hold 17 inch square Polar film if needed. Hot lights can melt polar film from the heat very quickly.. strobes are way safer..
              If all of this is sounding a bit much.. can you take the job outside?.. will they let you do that? You don't actually want direct sunlight on the face but cloudy bright or indirect light is great.. Another resort is you can also rig up some daylight balanced fluorescents ...you may be able to rent these also... ah one more thought..Elinchrome has 1000watt scan lights in a small head ( same size as their strobe heads..) you may be able to rent these also ...lotsa punch in a small package.. the color of their light is perfect for artwork as is..

              good luck..

              jimbo

              From: Jeffrey Martin
              To: panotoolsng
              Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 5:14 AM
              Subject: [PanoToolsNG] OT: shooting art?



              someone out there must be experienced shooting art reproductions.... i have
              a question!

              when shooting art in a gallery, is it sufficient to use 2x halogen work
              lights (the kind you buy at the hardware store) pointed at 45º on each side?

              thanks!
              jeffrey

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • jrgen_schrader
              I d say it depends on what you want to achieve. If you just want to take an image, you might go with available light. But for a serious reproduction much more
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 23, 2011
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                I'd say it depends on what you want to achieve.

                If you just want to take an image, you might go with available light.
                But for a serious reproduction much more is involved and that doesn't start with lighting. Even the proper setup of tripod and camera can be a real challenge. Besides the choice for the right light source the best setup of the light is highly dependent on the subject itself.

                There's plenty of information on the web regarding these issues.


                --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Martin <panoramas@...> wrote:
                >
                > someone out there must be experienced shooting art reproductions.... i have
                > a question!
                >
                > when shooting art in a gallery, is it sufficient to use 2x halogen work
                > lights (the kind you buy at the hardware store) pointed at 45º on each side?
                >
                >
                >
                > thanks!
                > jeffrey
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Hans
                ... If you are talking about oil paintings you should never shoot with lights on each side. This destroys completely the structure of the artwork. Back in the
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 23, 2011
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                  --- In PanoToolsNG@yahoogroups.com, Jeffrey Martin <panoramas@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > someone out there must be experienced shooting art reproductions.... i have
                  > a question!
                  >
                  > when shooting art in a gallery, is it sufficient to use 2x halogen work
                  > lights (the kind you buy at the hardware store) pointed at 45º on each side?

                  If you are talking about oil paintings you should never shoot with lights on each side.

                  This destroys completely the structure of the artwork.
                  Back in the 90th I used to shoot it with 1 halogen lamp up to 10 m away for large oilpaintings.

                  In todays digital world you may be able to do it with one single light, usually a hard light, from one side at a shorter distance.
                  You can then compensate for the light fall using a simple graduation layer in photoshop.

                  And of course you should use a tele lens so that you fill up your frame at a distance of at least 3 times the long side of the painting.
                  Too short distance will easy give you reflections.

                  Hans




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                  > thanks!
                  > jeffrey
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